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Removing Fragrance Oil

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Kiff

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Does anyone have a recommendation for how to remove fragrance oil from a large stainless steel wax melter after making soy candles?
 

SaltedFig

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Citric acid (or vinegar, or lemon juice) and bicarb, plus hot water to soak, will take just about everything off stainless, including odors.

Alternatively, use sodium bicarbonate as a dry powder scrub, then going over it with vinegar and rinsing in hot water should clean it back to plain smelling again. Might need to give it an ordinary dish wash to finish it off (to remove the "clean" stainless smell).
 

Zany_in_CO

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Try 1 tablespoon of washing soda per 16 oz hot water and allow it to soak for 5 minutes. Wear gloves! It's good for cleaning wax off pots too. The oil & wax float to the top; pour through a paper towel to catch the waxy /oily bits and into a container with a lid and it can be stored on a shelf and used again.

HTH
 

Saffron

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Lye solution is often used in industries to clean stainless steel containers - a brewer friend tells me. I use lye to clean my stainless steel kitchen sink, and boy does it sparkle!
Disclaimer - Please take the necessary precautions when using lye.
 

SaltedFig

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Lye solution is often used in industries to clean stainless steel containers - a brewer friend tells me. I use lye to clean my stainless steel kitchen sink, and boy does it sparkle!
Disclaimer - Please take the necessary precautions when using lye.
Saffron, that's just plain cheating!

You'd think we were a bunch of soapers or something ... :washingdishes:
 

Saffron

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Saffron: I imagine it would clear the drain of soap muck as well. I presume we're talking just a light lye solution?
TBH I just sprinkle about 1/2 TBS sodium hydroxide granules around the sink and scrub with a sponge and let is stand for a minute or two to do its magic, then rinse off with cold water - much like we used to do with the old scouring powders (like Vim). Then pour boiling water down the drain to clear any soap muck and grease. :washingdishes:
 

earlene

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In my youth, with my first house and an old gas stove of the type that one can take apart and clean each part, my Mom taught me to soak the parts in lye solution. Works like a dream! As to how weak, I can't say I really recall anything resembling the precision for weight measures for soapmaking. It was more like we cook... Fill the utility sink with water, pour in some lye, after it dissolves, place stove parts (panels of inside walls, basically), let soak. Not a super strong solution compared to what we use to make soap, but also not as dilute as what is used to make hominy.

Every bit of burned on food just slid right off with a soaking and there were no residual odors. Of course I wore gloves and and so forth.
 

jcandleattic

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In my experience I have found that just cleaning with soapy water is sufficient. It's stainless steel, and I've never had a scent transfer to new candles when just washing this way. Ever
 

Zany_in_CO

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In my youth, with my first house and an old gas stove of the type that one can take apart and clean each part, my Mom taught me to soak the parts in lye solution. Works like a dream! ... Every bit of burned on food just slid right off with a soaking and there were no residual odors. Of course I wore gloves and and so forth.
I'm always amazed at what I learn on this forum!
Thank You.gif
 

lyschelw

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I guess my question would be why clean it? When we are making candles we do what is called a dirty clean. If there is a lot of left over wax we pour it out. If it was a dark color we wipe with a paper towel. We then add hot soy to the pot, swish and pour it back into the large pot of wax to re-use. We never touch our equipment with water. If there is just a little FO left in the pot I doubt it would affect anything :)
 

SaltedFig

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"... why clean it?"

I make candles, but not all of the time.

A dirty clean is fine for a dedicated pot, but not so great for a sometimes use pot.
 

lyschelw

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Ah, I see. If it is soy wax and FO you should be able to get out the scent with just soap and warm water. But I still wouldn't eat out of it ;)
 
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