Recipe with short shelf life

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gdawgs

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I've acquired an industrial grade anti-oxidant (similar to vitamin E) that I'd like to test. Does anyone have a recipe that has a really short shelf life? Or have another way of testing?
 

snappyllama

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Off the top of my head... something with a lot of hemp oil or flax seed oil. I don't use flax seed since it goes off so quickly. For hemp, I always keep it to 15% or under in a high lard recipe and haven't seen any issues with that amount. For your testing purposes, maybe go for 100% hemp with and without your additive to see how that goes.
 

Barbsbreakingbath

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Preservative

Try making a lotion instead of a soap, with hemp oil. Sadly, I've got a lot of experience in this area. If it goes rancid, the smell is unmistakable, and you'll know pretty quickly.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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An anti oxidising agent won't be much help in a lotion as it doesn't stop mould growing.

I think something with hemp oil that is near the best before date would be good, but then I can imagine that dos is harder to recreate when you actually want it!
 

gdawgs

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Thanks for the suggestions. I have grape seed and canola readily available. I also have almond (I thought I was ordering almond FO, but it was actually oil, oops) which I believe I read somewhere goes bad easily.

So I think I'll make a few mini batches of a few different types, and split each batch so I can have some with and some without the anti-oxidant.

When do you typically add an anti-oxidant? A guy I work with who has a PHD in chemical engineering said I should add it after the lye, so probably when it gets close to trace. The problem with the stuff I have is that it is in solid form, so I need to pre-dissolve it in something. Unfortunately it's not water soluble, but it looks like it dissolves in warm oil, so I will have to go that route.
 

DeeAnna

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If the antioxidant can't be exposed to lye, then you need to use a hot process method and add it after the cook. At trace, the lye is still very much active -- trace is only a visual indicator of a stable emulsion and that's all. Why not get a tech sheet and read up on this product and how it should be used? I'm not saying to doubt the PhD's advice, but I'm guessing he/she isn't a soaper. It would be best if ~you~ can interpret the info in light of what you know about making soap.
 

Barbsbreakingbath

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Preservative

An anti oxidising agent won't be much help in a lotion as it doesn't stop mould growing.

I think something with hemp oil that is near the best before date would be good, but then I can imagine that dos is harder to recreate when you actually want it!
A lotion would typically have a preservative such as Optiphen or Germall to prevent mold and bacteria growth. They don't Keep oils from going rancid. I understand there are people out there that make preservative free lotion.
I haven't had much luck with Topcapherol as an anti oxidant. I understand this is a sopmakers forum, but making a lotion with a preservative such as optiphen, and hemp oil close to expiration might get you faster, more reliable results than trying to produce DOS in soap. You also wouldn't have to worry about lye.
 
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galaxyMLP

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From your description, it sounds like BHT. If it is BHT, you'll need to mix it in oil for sure. And it will still take some time to dissolve. I don't really know how the lye would effect that but it seems BHT is stable up to a pH of 9 which would be too low, you'd have to hp it. However, I think Dr. Dunn used it in some of his experiments in his "scientific soapmaking" book. I don't know how he used it since I don't have the book...

Of course, I could be completely off base here!
 

topofmurrayhill

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From your description, it sounds like BHT. If it is BHT, you'll need to mix it in oil for sure. And it will still take some time to dissolve. I don't really know how the lye would effect that but it seems BHT is stable up to a pH of 9 which would be too low, you'd have to hp it. However, I think Dr. Dunn used it in some of his experiments in his "scientific soapmaking" book. I don't know how he used it since I don't have the book...
You just melt it into your oils and soap as usual. At one time I used it regularly and it's stable in the process as far as I know.
 

galaxyMLP

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Thanks! That's what I figured but I wasn't sure. I really need to get that book...
 

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