Rancid soap after a week if cure

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Wendjie

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Hi Everyone so happy ton find this forum. I hope you understand m'y english cause i speek french 🙂. Here us my problème: i have been seerching for months why my soap have whites spot after a week of cure and then go Rancid. I will Tell you what i have try:
Change all of my oil ( they smell all good), use water whitout minéral (then boiled), use a déshumidificateur in the Room for curing, change the recipie 4 différents recipie. Change the shelf that i put m'y soap...maybe i forgot other things lol. Can you help me please? IT would be so nice! Here is an exemple how its begin after a week.
 

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Wendjie

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I try 3-4 différent recipe here is one : coco oil 240g, olive oil 415 g, jojoba 60, shea butter 75, Clay 10, eo lavander 22, eucalyptus 8, water 264 and lye 109. Another one: coco oil 240g, olive oil 450 g , shea butter 60, bee wax 40, Clay 5, eo lavander 22 eucalyptus 8, water 262, lye 108. Thank you!
 

DeeAnna

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I recommend making at least one batch of soap with NO essential oils and see how that goes.

Some essential oils can cause rancidity to happen very quickly, especially lavender EO. If an EO becomes oxidized, it will make the soap to rancid faster than anything else I've seen.

In my experience, soap I had scented with lavender EO was obviously rancid about 8-12 weeks after I made the soap.
 

lsg

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Unless your oils or butters were rancid before soap making; I couldn't spot any oils/butters that would cause the soap to be rancid in just one week. What was your process for adding they clay? The clay might not have been fully incorporated into the soap batter; or sometimes white spots equal soda ash. Soda ash is just cosmetic and can be either wiped off or steamed off the bars.
 

Wendjie

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Unless your oils or butters were rancid before soap making; I couldn't spot any oils/butters that would cause the soap to be rancid in just one week. What was your process for adding they clay? The clay might not have been fully incorporated into the soap batter; or sometimes white spots equal soda ash. Soda ask is just cosmetic and can be either wiped off or steamed off the bars.
I use to delay the clay with the eo or with a little bit of oil. The white spot cannot be wipe if i cut the soap it still There!
 

lsg

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It's my guess that it is either clay or unincorporated wax or butter.
 

Wendjie

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It's my guess that it is either clay or unincorporated wax or butter.
No its gonna go rancid in a couple of week 😕. I lost 6-7 batch trying to fix the problem by changing one thing at the time but didnt find yet. Thanks for your help 🙂
 

Wendjie

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Could it be some kind of contaminant that can cause early spot/dos like that? From my stick blender? Still searching 🤔
 

melinda48

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I recommend making at least one batch of soap with NO essential oils and see how that goes.

Some essential oils can cause rancidity to happen very quickly, especially lavender EO. If an EO becomes oxidized, it will make the soap to rancid faster than anything else I've seen.

In my experience, soap I had scented with lavender EO was obviously rancid about 8-12 weeks after I made the soap.
I never knew that about lavender EO and have not experienced any rancidity in my soaps due to it. Perhaps it is the source and not the EO. I buy from New Directions Aromatics.
 

melinda48

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I try 3-4 différent recipe here is one : coco oil 240g, olive oil 415 g, jojoba 60, shea butter 75, Clay 10, eo lavander 22, eucalyptus 8, water 264 and lye 109. Another one: coco oil 240g, olive oil 450 g , shea butter 60, bee wax 40, Clay 5, eo lavander 22 eucalyptus 8, water 262, lye 108. Thank you!
Maybe try a small batch (like two bars) of 100% coconut oil; one of 100% olive oil and see what happens. Double check the expiration date on the shea butter. don’t use the beeswax for now. Quite the dilemme!
 

AliOop

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I agree with DeeAnna regarding the lavender EO. Even if you bought high quality EOs, if they were stored improperly, or simply for too long, they can go rancid. Lavender is a frequent culprit per reports from a fair number of soapers. I don't know if it is because lavender oxidizes more easily than some oils, or because it is a very popular oil so there is more of it out there to potentially go bad. People often buy a larger quantity of lavender EO (due to lower cost and higher popularity compared to other EOs) and keep it around for years, not paying attention to the storage conditions.
 

DeeAnna

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I never knew that about lavender EO and have not experienced any rancidity in my soaps due to it. Perhaps it is the source and not the EO. I buy from New Directions Aromatics.
There is reputable research to show certain EOs oxidize over time, even if the EOs are purchased from the most impeccable of sources. Lavender is one of those EOs that is known to oxidize. If you haven't encountered this issue in your soap making, that's great. But it doesn't mean the problem does not exist.

An oxidized EO can not only trigger rancidity in soap or fat, but the oxidized chemicals in that EO can also cause skin irritation. The same EO, same supplier, but not oxidized, will not cause rancidity or skin irritation.

See also AliOop's post above -- good stuff there.
 

melinda48

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There is reputable research to show certain EOs oxidize over time, even if the EOs are purchased from the most impeccable of sources. Lavender is one of those EOs that is known to oxidize. If you haven't encountered this issue in your soap making, that's great. But it doesn't mean the problem does not exist.

An oxidized EO can not only trigger rancidity in soap or fat, but the oxidized chemicals in that EO can also cause skin irritation. The same EO, same supplier, but not oxidized, will not cause rancidity or skin irritation.

See also AliOop's post above -- good stuff there.
I had no idea. This is one thing I love about this group - the extensive knowledge, freely shared. Thank you!
 

Wendjie

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There is reputable research to show certain EOs oxidize over time, even if the EOs are purchased from the most impeccable of sources. Lavender is one of those EOs that is known to oxidize. If you haven't encountered this issue in your soap making, that's great. But it doesn't mean the problem does not exist.

An oxidized EO can not only trigger rancidity in soap or fat, but the oxidized chemicals in that EO can also cause skin irritation. The same EO, same supplier, but not oxidized, will not cause rancidity or skin irritation.

See also AliOop's post above -- good stuff there.
Ok. Is it why a lot of soapmaker use fragrance instead of eo? Cause i had that problem with other eo but not with all.
 

Wendjie

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I agree with DeeAnna regarding the lavender EO. Even if you bought high quality EOs, if they were stored improperly, or simply for too long, they can go rancid. Lavender is a frequent culprit per reports from a fair number of soapers. I don't know if it is because lavender oxidizes more easily than some oils, or because it is a very popular oil so there is more of it out there to potentially go bad. People often buy a larger quantity of lavender EO (due to lower cost and higher popularity compared to other EOs) and keep it around for years, not paying attention to the storage conditions.
Ok i tough because it was a big wholesaler that would not be an issue. Maybe i should just continue with the fragrances that are ok(no spot) 😕
 

DeeAnna

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Ok. Is it why a lot of soapmaker use fragrance instead of eo? Cause i had that problem with other eo but not with all.
I do not think your problem is definitely from the EOs. That is just a guess on my part. The proof will come when you make soap without any EOs and see if it is OK.

Many soap makers use fragrance oils (FOs) because they are often less expensive than EOs. Another reason is FOs come in scents that cannot be created with essential oils only.
 

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