Third Time Lucky Lavender?

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After two batches of Lavender soap going rancid within the past 8 months, this soap has been given the opportunity to redeem itself and find a place in my list of 'must-have-in-stock-at-all-times'.
The first batch I assumed had gone rancid because of the Lavender EO, which has a tendency to oxidise quickly (and I bought a big bottle second hand in a de-stash, but it was still well within its expiry), so the second batch I made without EO and used a Lavender FO instead - bolstered with a touch of Patchouli and Rose Geranium EOs for depth. But that also went rancid - quite quickly in fact, within 8 weeks of making it.
I finally realised (due a batch of BRV soap also going rancid) that the problem was due a dark purple mica I was using. It was the only common denominator.
So today, I have made a batch and I want you all to keep your fingers crossed that 'everything's gonna be alright' (thank you Bob Marley). I used 50% FO, 45% Lavender EO, and 5% Rose Geranium EO. And thanks to inspiration from @GuacamoleSalad I did my first ever mini drop swirl (which took forever and I don't plan on doing again in a hurry). I'm rather pleased with the result - although you will forgive my signature glycerin rivers I hope.
IMG_7217.jpg
 
After two batches of Lavender soap going rancid within the past 8 months, this soap has been given the opportunity to redeem itself and find a place in my list of 'must-have-in-stock-at-all-times'.
The first batch I assumed had gone rancid because of the Lavender EO, which has a tendency to oxidise quickly (and I bought a big bottle second hand in a de-stash, but it was still well within its expiry), so the second batch I made without EO and used a Lavender FO instead - bolstered with a touch of Patchouli and Rose Geranium EOs for depth. But that also went rancid - quite quickly in fact, within 8 weeks of making it.
I finally realised (due a batch of BRV soap also going rancid) that the problem was due a dark purple mica I was using. It was the only common denominator.
So today, I have made a batch and I want you all to keep your fingers crossed that 'everything's gonna be alright' (thank you Bob Marley). I used 50% FO, 45% Lavender EO, and 5% Rose Geranium EO. And thanks to inspiration from @GuacamoleSalad I did my first ever mini drop swirl (which took forever and I don't plan on doing again in a hurry). I'm rather pleased with the result - although you will forgive my signature glycerin rivers I hope.
View attachment 76703
Oh that's beautiful!! How did pouring from pitchers work? Do you remember what kind of trace you used?
 
Beautiful soap! I tried making a soap with glycerine rivers on purpose and just ended up with normal soap hahaha. My fingers are crossed for you that it works out and your bars stay good for a long time!🤞🏻
Soap is very independent and will do whatever it wants. Usually the opposite of what you want it to do. 🙃
 
After two batches of Lavender soap going rancid within the past 8 months, this soap has been given the opportunity to redeem itself and find a place in my list of 'must-have-in-stock-at-all-times'.
The first batch I assumed had gone rancid because of the Lavender EO, which has a tendency to oxidise quickly (and I bought a big bottle second hand in a de-stash, but it was still well within its expiry), so the second batch I made without EO and used a Lavender FO instead - bolstered with a touch of Patchouli and Rose Geranium EOs for depth. But that also went rancid - quite quickly in fact, within 8 weeks of making it.
I finally realised (due a batch of BRV soap also going rancid) that the problem was due a dark purple mica I was using. It was the only common denominator.
So today, I have made a batch and I want you all to keep your fingers crossed that 'everything's gonna be alright' (thank you Bob Marley). I used 50% FO, 45% Lavender EO, and 5% Rose Geranium EO. And thanks to inspiration from @GuacamoleSalad I did my first ever mini drop swirl (which took forever and I don't plan on doing again in a hurry). I'm rather pleased with the result - although you will forgive my signature glycerin rivers I hope.
View attachment 76703
Thank you for this post! I recently had a dot or two show up in my lavender clay soap and just assumed that the lavender eo was to blame. I too have a 16 oz bottle with over 1/2 left. Going to do some sluething with my mica's now. They are far less costly to replace. can you please tell us which mica and where you bought it? I had queens purple and orchid mica from bb and pow pow purple from mad mica's. I just restocked the orchid, so praying that's not my culprit.

Tky in advance for your reply.
 
How frustrating that the mica should be making it rancid. When you say rancid, was it localized DOS or global rancidity with that gross smell that the soap I gave my mother over 25 years ago that she won’t use because “it’s too pretty” has? If it’s DOS could there be metal contaminants in the mica? I too am curious about the vendor. If it’s rancidity of the oils, I wonder what could be happening? Sending up the bat signal for @DeeAnna
(Edited to correct my description of DOS vs global rancidity)
 
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DOS is rancidity. It's just rancidity that's occurring in localized spots rather than rancidity happening over most or all of the soap. DOS can expand over time into all-over rancidity, or it can stay localized. But it's still all rancidity.

Anything that's an intimate part of ALL the soap can trigger all-over rancidity. All-over rancidity doesn't appear to be quite as common as DOS, at least based on the rancid soap that people talk about here and on my own experience. And a lot of the time when it does happen, people are able to figure out the culprit.

To give a couple of examples: I've had older, oxidized lavender EO trigger all-over rancidity. This particular batch of soap was uncolored, but I split the batch into two parts, one scented with the lavender EO and the other with mint EO. The different EO used was the only difference in the two parts. The lavender portion became rancid about 8-10 weeks after the soap was made, but the mint soap stayed good.

I've also had rose clay trigger all-over rancidity in the areas that were colored with just that clay. The areas of the same soap that had no added color or were colored with french green clay were fine. I'm betting the problem I had with the rose clay is similar to Kiwi's troubles with the purple mica.

A good antioxidant like rosemary oleoresin extract (ROE) can help a lot with all-over rancidity if the rancidity is due to oxidized fats. ROE is especially helpful when added right away to fats to protect them during storage (rather than waiting to add ROE when making soap). A chelator added to the soap batter is additional insurance, because all-over rancidity can be due to other problems besides oxidized fat.

Any contaminant that's localized can trigger spots of rancidity (aka DOS). Invisible (or visible) spots of contaminants such as metal particles can trigger DOS. This type of rancidity is probably common than all-over rancidity, but I think it's harder to figure out the culprint. A good chelator can help a lot with DOS.

More in my article: https://classicbells.com/soap/rancidity.asp
 
DOS is rancidity. It's just rancidity that's occurring in localized spots rather than rancidity happening over most or all of the soap. DOS can expand over time into all-over rancidity, or it can stay localized. But it's still all rancidity.

Anything that's an intimate part of ALL the soap can trigger all-over rancidity. All-over rancidity doesn't appear to be quite as common as DOS, at least based on the rancid soap that people talk about here and on my own experience. And a lot of the time when it does happen, people are able to figure out the culprit.

To give a couple of examples: I've had older, oxidized lavender EO trigger all-over rancidity. This particular batch of soap was uncolored, but I split the batch into two parts, one scented with the lavender EO and the other with mint EO. The different EO used was the only difference in the two parts. The lavender portion became rancid about 8-10 weeks after the soap was made, but the mint soap stayed good.

I've also had rose clay trigger all-over rancidity in the areas that were colored with just that clay. The areas of the same soap that had no added color or were colored with french green clay were fine. I'm betting the problem I had with the rose clay is similar to Kiwi's troubles with the purple mica.

A good antioxidant like rosemary oleoresin extract (ROE) can help a lot with all-over rancidity if the rancidity is due to oxidized fats. ROE is especially helpful when added right away to fats to protect them during storage (rather than waiting to add ROE when making soap). A chelator added to the soap batter is additional insurance, because all-over rancidity can be due to other problems besides oxidized fat.

Any contaminant that's localized can trigger spots of rancidity (aka DOS). Invisible (or visible) spots of contaminants such as metal particles can trigger DOS. This type of rancidity is probably common than all-over rancidity, but I think it's harder to figure out the culprint. A good chelator can help a lot with DOS.

More in my article: https://classicbells.com/soap/rancidity.asp
Thank you for sharing this! I am now going to look up making sodium citrate and usage rates and doing some tests. I got into soaping for a unique skin/autoimmune disorder which i have. Also, being a degreed chemist and an avid foodie cook, who was gaining weight, lol, i find soaping scratches my itch for the technical and the creative sides of myself.
 
DOS is rancidity. It's just rancidity that's occurring in localized spots rather than rancidity happening over most or all of the soap. DOS can expand over time into all-over rancidity, or it can stay localized. But it's still all rancidity.

Anything that's an intimate part of ALL the soap can trigger all-over rancidity. All-over rancidity doesn't appear to be quite as common as DOS, at least based on the rancid soap that people talk about here and on my own experience. And a lot of the time when it does happen, people are able to figure out the culprit.

To give a couple of examples: I've had older, oxidized lavender EO trigger all-over rancidity. This particular batch of soap was uncolored, but I split the batch into two parts, one scented with the lavender EO and the other with mint EO. The different EO used was the only difference in the two parts. The lavender portion became rancid about 8-10 weeks after the soap was made, but the mint soap stayed good.

I've also had rose clay trigger all-over rancidity in the areas that were colored with just that clay. The areas of the same soap that had no added color or were colored with french green clay were fine. I'm betting the problem I had with the rose clay is similar to Kiwi's troubles with the purple mica.

A good antioxidant like rosemary oleoresin extract (ROE) can help a lot with all-over rancidity if the rancidity is due to oxidized fats. ROE is especially helpful when added right away to fats to protect them during storage (rather than waiting to add ROE when making soap). A chelator added to the soap batter is additional insurance, because all-over rancidity can be due to other problems besides oxidized fat.

Any contaminant that's localized can trigger spots of rancidity (aka DOS). Invisible (or visible) spots of contaminants such as metal particles can trigger DOS. This type of rancidity is probably common than all-over rancidity, but I think it's harder to figure out the culprint. A good chelator can help a lot with DOS.

More in my article: https://classicbells.com/soap/rancidity.asp
Thank you! I think I sort of knew that, but in my mind I was picturing very old shrunken soap in my mother’s bathroom that didn’t have DOS. And yes your info on rancidity is excellent, I now use ROE in my master batches and sodium gluconate in my lye.
 
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