Overheating help!

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Arwen Falvey

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I'm not new to soap making (started in 1997) but I don't often make soaps with goat's milk in them. This particular batch I'm working on has Goat's milk and honey in it. I made the batch and all was well so I threw it in the freezer for 18 hours to make sure it didn't overheat and scald the milk. Took it out later and let it thaw. When I went to cut it it had gelled in the middle and scalded the milk and left the bars with brown dots in them. I guess I don't understand how it overheated while it was frozen? Any advice is welcome!
 

NsMar42111

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The honey can cause the brown dots and can overheat by itself, freezer or not... Did you soap at room temp or hotter?
 

earlene

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It overheated before it was frozen.

Sorry to sound so cryptic. As NsMar42111 mentioned, the honey really overheats, and even if you put soap batter that contains sugars into the freezer, it takes a long time for the entire loaf to cool down. The inner core of the soap was heating up while the outer edges were trying to cool down, that's why you have partial gel.
 

Arwen Falvey

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The honey can cause the brown dots and can overheat by itself, freezer or not... Did you soap at room temp or hotter?
I did soap at room temperature, but right now room temperature is hotter than usual (heatwave). I read somewhere that adding the honey to the lye water rather than the oils or soap batter can help prevent the honey from going crazy. Maybe I'll try that?

It overheated before it was frozen.

Sorry to sound so cryptic. As NsMar42111 mentioned, the honey really overheats, and even if you put soap batter that contains sugars into the freezer, it takes a long time for the entire loaf to cool down. The inner core of the soap was heating up while the outer edges were trying to cool down, that's why you have partial gel.
That makes sense! I'll try adding the honey to the lye water instead of the soap batter, make a smaller batch, and pour the bars in separate molds so they can cool faster. Also maybe get an air conditioner :p It's hot out there folks!
 
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soapmaker

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I don't know how you could add honey to lye water without it heating right up and turning dark. I never researched it to know if others do it or not but it didn't work for me. I was just trying things out of curiosity one day. Someone on here dissolves it in a little water called for in the recipe before adding it (I think) to the oils.
 

Zany_in_CO

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I don't know how you could add honey to lye water without it heating right up and turning dark. I never researched it to know if others do it or not but it didn't work for me. I was just trying things out of curiosity one day. Someone on here dissolves it in a little water called for in the recipe before adding it (I think) to the oils.
I've never tried adding honey to the lye solution so I don't have any input there. I have one HP recipe, Honey, Oats & Goat Milk that I mix honey 50/50 with water, warmed, and add it to the batch after the cook. It sizzles, which is kinda fun, then I mix for one full minute before molding up. For regular ole GM soap CP that I make for a wholesale customer, I add the warm honey undiluted to the warmed oils and mix thoroughly before adding the lye solution. For that one, tho, I almost always use GM powder, added to the oils as well -- much easier than the liquid milk, IMO.
 

Arwen Falvey

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I don't know how you could add honey to lye water without it heating right up and turning dark. I never researched it to know if others do it or not but it didn't work for me. I was just trying things out of curiosity one day. Someone on here dissolves it in a little water called for in the recipe before adding it (I think) to the oils.
Good point. Will try adding the honey to the oils before the lye water and see how that goes.

I've never tried adding honey to the lye solution so I don't have any input there. I have one HP recipe, Honey, Oats & Goat Milk that I mix honey 50/50 with water, warmed, and add it to the batch after the cook. It sizzles, which is kinda fun, then I mix for one full minute before molding up. For regular ole GM soap CP that I make for a wholesale customer, I add the warm honey undiluted to the warmed oils and mix thoroughly before adding the lye solution. For that one, tho, I almost always use GM powder, added to the oils as well -- much easier than the liquid milk, IMO.
I've got the adding of Goats milk down I think. I guess a smaller batch and smaller molds will be the biggest help in terms of keeping things cool. Thanks!
 
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lsg

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You might try using cavity molds. The volume in each cavity will be less and should cool down faster. I always put my milk soaps in the freezer. I think it is best to leave them at least two days.
 

Arwen Falvey

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You might try using cavity molds. The volume in each cavity will be less and should cool down faster. I always put my milk soaps in the freezer. I think it is best to leave them at least two days.
Thanks! I will try a smaller batch and individual molds :)
 

OldHippie

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I freeze my goat's milk into cubes and use the sprinkle NaOH and mix method. My lye never gets hot enough to turn the milk brown. I mix the honey with an ounce or two of milk and add at trace. At that point, it has little effect upon the temperature. I use a modified CPOP and always achieve gel. I left a single mini-bar out from this last batch to compare, and there was little difference in the final color.
 

OldHippie

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What is the sprinkle and mix method?
You sprinkle the NaOH over the frozen goat's milk, and it melts the milk. You must sprinkle and avoid dumping which can cause clumping or hot-spots. Mixing continuously keeps the cubes from freezing together, gets the NaOH into solution, and avoids NaOH clumps. It does splatter a little while you mix, so I use a larger vessel to give it some room. I monitor the temperature with a cheap infrared thermometer (which no soapmaker should be without).
 

amd

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I add honey after my batter has reached emulsion. I mix the honey with an equal amount of distilled water and warm it in the microwave for a few seconds (15-30 seconds depending on how warm my "room temperature" water is) and stick blend together to light trace. I don't put my honey soaps in the fridge/freezer because I let mine gel through (no milk in the soap so I don't have to worry about scorching), so I can't tell you if that helps with heating or not. It's just another way to skin the cat.
 

Zany_in_CO

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It's just another way to skin the cat.
Well said. :thumbs: I make the lye solution (with water) the night before soaping and chill it in the fridge overnight. I mix the oils, GM powder or liquid, honey & fragrance, and any other additives the night before and warm them slightly the next morning and start stick blending while adding the lye solution; Pour into a lined wood mold at emulsion stage; cover with 4-ply Mylar; put the lid on and leave overnight. Unmold the next morning. Cut the following day.
 
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penelopejane

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Like zany I use the split method for milk soap (mix lye 1:1 with water then add rest of liquid as milk to my oils) but I make it the same day and soap at 110*F. I only use 1 tablespoon of honey per 1000g oil. I put my soap in a silicone lined wood box with a lid and it gels. My soap turns out a dark ivory colour - like very milky coffee.
 

KristaY

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When I use honey I always add it to the water, once dissolved, SLOWLY add the lye. Yes, it goes dark orange then brown then lighter brown. Yep, it heats up a fair amount too. I just let it sit in the sink until the heated argument between the lye and honey calms down, move on as usual. I haven't had a batch overheat but I also haven't used honey and a milk. Maybe both is just too much sugar for the soap to handle?
 
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