layering

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bountifulsoaps

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I use to have no problem with layers. I'd put down one layer say white and then color the rest of the soap and layer the top. In the last 4 batches the top later makes it way through the lower layer in one big blob. So what am I doing different? I just makde a rosemary mint with a pink at the bottom and green at top but it is mixed? Am I pouring the top layer too soon. My recipe is Olive, Castor, Coconut, Palm and Shea. I am about 50/50 between soft/hard oils. Should I lower the Olive? Been making soap for years but can't do all those beautiful swirls and layers. I wish I could take a class on that.:-?
 

newbie

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I don't think you need to change your recipe. If the top is falling through then it could be that all your soap is too thin or perhaps it is in how you are trying to get the top layer on. If you are pouring from too high or giving it any sort of speed as it hits the bottom layer, it is more likely to drop through.

You could try a couple things. One is to SB the bottom color more after you have separated the two parts of your layers out. SB the bottom color to medium trace and the pour and pound your mold to get that layer smooth. Then you could add your top color whether it's thin or thicker as long as you are gently laying it on top of the already poured soap. You could gently spoon it on or pour that over a spatula that is held close to the surface of the bottom layer so that it is very softly falling on to the bottom layer.

If you like working with batter that is at a thinner trace, you can pour the base but then you have to be very very careful how you get the next layer on. You can try pouring it very slowly down a straw or skewer with the bottom of the straw or skewer RIGHT above the other soap, so it gently sits on top. you would have to keep moving the tool around the surface so you get a nice layer on and once there is enough on there, you can pour the top more quickly but I wouldn't just dump it in because the pressure could still move the line between the two colors.

SB'ing the bottom to a thicker trace is the safer method. It's harder for anything to drop through thicker batter. I

I hope that is helpful.
 
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dixiedragon

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Newbie what a good idea! I never thought of that. I too have the problem if I am doing layers - more than 2, anyway - is that I am struggling with either having the first layer too thin so I have time to work, or the last layer is too thick.
 

newbie

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SB'ing just to emulsion and then separating things out gives a lot more working time. If your FO is a factor, you could separate that too and add it to the batter, mixing well, just before you do that layer. Using a more accelerating FO this way is one really good way to use an accelerator successfully and each layer will firm up before you get the next one ready. Getting just to emulsion and not to trace seem to be an obstacle for many though, but if you are doing more work to the batter, whether giving it time or doing more stirring or both, you can err of the less blended side because you can always blend more after it's separated into parts but you can't blend less. Love my Badger mixer just for this reason; you can blend small amounts that a SBer can't get into.
 

cmzaha

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accelerating fo's work well for layers. You separate out your batter after emulsification is reached then mix the fo in each layer as you go. Works great for cranky accelerating fo's
 

IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
I do what Newbie does (stickblend the bottom layer until thick enough to support the weight of the top layer). I've also done the same thing as Carolyn (using accelerators for the bottom layer). Works great!


IrishLass :)
 
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