My soap is making my hands feel dry right after use but my skin feels softer later?

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chloecaldasso

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Okay, so I am new to soap making and tried my first few batches of soap using a recipe in a soap making book. The recipe is as follows:

14 oz Palm Oil
18 oz Olive Oil
16 oz Coconut Oil
7.10 oz Sodium Hydroxide
17.5 oz Distilled Water
6 tsp Fragrance Oil

I found all the ingredients but Palm Oil locally so the first batch I substituted it with Lard (using its appropriate SAP) and when it had dried I tried a small scrap of left over and while it lathered well, when I washed it off and dried my hands my skin felt extremely dry, like my skin was squeaking when I rubbed my fingers together. However, later on my skin seemed to feel softer. I don't like that initial feeling though! Since I plan on selling my soaps, I doubt customers would like it either.

So, on to my second batch, I replaced the Lard with Safflower Oil and the same thing happened once it was dried! So, it must not have been the Lard or the Safflower Oil, right? I also added a small amount of liquid soap dye to each batch.

To give a little more information, these are the specific products that I used:

Farmer John's Lard
LouAna Coconut Oil
LouAna Safflower Oil
Fior d'Italia's Golden Drops Extra Virgin Olive Oil Blend (Mix of Olive Oil and Canola Oil)
Kleen-Out Drain Opener 100% Lye
Sparkletts Distilled Water
LoneStar Liquid Soap Fragrance
ArtMinds Liquid Soap Colorant

Does the product brand matter if it's pure? Also, I just noticed that my Olive Oil was a blend and not pure Olive Oil, could this be it?

One more thing, are there any wholesale websites you recommend that give cheaper prices?
 

Dorymae

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I'm not sure where to begin. First you have just made your first batch of soap, from a recipe you got out of a book, and you say you are going to sell your soaps? I'm hoping that you meant you are going to sell your soaps in a year, once you have learned how to make soap, can formulate your own recipes, have enough knowledge to realize that a soap fresh made is much much harsher than a soap that is properly cured. (This is your problem btw) a proper cure is a minimum of 4 weeks, however for most soaps they benefit from a longer 8 week cure. Some soaps, ones high in olive oil for one, need much much longer.

Soap making can be fraught with problems, some harder to diagnose than others. Please take the time to learn before selling soap, the general public deserve to get a good product for a fair price.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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KristaY

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As Dorymae said, you have to have a much longer cure. Another problem is your coconut oil is too high at over 33%. The Soap Calc cleansing # for your recipe is 23, which will result in a drying soap (because it's cleaning too well). I keep mine between 14-17. Lard is an excellent swap for palm so that was a good choice. A great recipe using the oils you have would be:
50% lard
30% OO
20% CO
If you can get castor oil, that will help with lather. Use it at 5% and decrease the OO to 25%.

Also, if you're getting recipes out of a book, be sure to use a reliable lye calculator like Soap Calc. It's always best to double check their lye calculations as errors can happen when printing. Better to be safe than sorry!
 

chloecaldasso

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I'm not sure where to begin. First you have just made your first batch of soap, from a recipe you got out of a book, and you say you are going to sell your soaps? I'm hoping that you meant you are going to sell your soaps in a year, once you have learned how to make soap, can formulate your own recipes, have enough knowledge to realize that a soap fresh made is much much harsher than a soap that is properly cured. (This is your problem btw) a proper cure is a minimum of 4 weeks, however for most soaps they benefit from a longer 8 week cure. Some soaps, ones high in olive oil for one, need much much longer.

Soap making can be fraught with problems, some harder to diagnose than others. Please take the time to learn before selling soap, the general public deserve to get a good product for a fair price.
I haven't sold anything yet, let's just clarify that. I don't see a problem with perfecting a recipe and selling that good product. I already have a business that I sell other skin care products through and now I'm trying to add soap in. There's no reason to be snarky about it. It's imperative that everyone start somewhere. Or am I wrong?


Also, as an added note: I've got 20 bars 10 from each batch that have been curing for about 6 weeks now. I tried them both earlier today which is what led me to seek advice. I know that soaps need to cure, maybe not for how long for each particular recipe, but I'm using my resources to LEARN. I'd appreciate if commenters refrained from rude and condescending comments.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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I am sorry, Chloe, but when someone comes along and talks about selling soap when they are just beginning with making it and are clearly struggling, people WILL suggest that you don't sell. It is a good idea to see if you a) can make soap and b) enjoy making soap before you think about selling it.

Soap is not like other skincare products. As you have found out, it is easy to make something that is horrid or even outright dangerous - one of the main reasons why we tell new people to forget about selling for a while.

I don't know why soaping is seen differently, but if I said "I am going to make and sell cakes. Now, how do I make cakes?" people would also suggest that I learn first and THEN think about whether or not I sell. That said, it is great that you want to learn and people here (including those who posted already about you not selling) are lovely people who can help you to learn, but you have to let us. Or you can get your back up about responses (considering that people do not HAVE to answer you at all!) and then people won't respond...................................

As to people answering questions that you didn't ask, I use my favourite example - Go to a parenting website and ask them if you should give your 8 year old child cigars or cigarettes to smoke. Then tell me how many responses you get and how many actually answer your question.
 
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Susie

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First, you go learn how to use a good lye calculator. Then you never, ever make a batch without running the numbers yourself, no matter where you got the recipe from. Typos happen. Here is a good tutorial:

http://www.soapmakingforum.com/showthread.php?t=49627

Second, your percentages are sort of backwards if you want a soap that feels more conditioning. You want CO to be no more than 20%(as stated above). You do want your palm/lard/tallow to be the bulk of the soap, I like at least 50% lard minimum. Here is my recipe for a good bar of soap. Nothing special in it, but it is a good, reliable recipe that I give out to anyone that asks.:lol:

Lard(can sub palm or tallow) 55%
CO 20%
OO 20%
Castor Oil 5%

Superfat 5%

Third, if you posted something that we knew was a bad idea, don't you expect us to tell you that? If not, why did you ask, right? Same thing goes for selling soap. We know how long it takes to get a couple of good recipes that can be tweaked this way or that with decent results(to give folks some choice), then get your scents/colors/other additives down, then get the swirls/packaging/etc figured out, then wait long enough to be sure your soap will not develop DOS or some other bad results. It takes at least a year. Truly.

I don't use artificial colorants. I don't use FOs. I don't package my soaps. I don't use lots of additives. I don't sell. It still took me almost a year to get that good, basic recipe down pat with the EOs I like and know how they act in my recipes. Really it did! You need that time before thinking to sell your soap. Because you need 6-8 weeks cure time for each tweak. That is a LOT of time commitment before moving on to the next tweak. This is not like making a product that you can try today and tweak tomorrow.

You are going to try lots of things that don't work as intended, or have really disastrous results. Seizes, soap-on-a-stick, volcanoes, ricing, false trace, EOs that fade, colors that morph, additives that don't add anything but cost to the soap, lye pockets, DOS...the list goes on and on. I call it kissing a lot of frogs before you find your prince.
 
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TBandCW

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I don't think anyone was condescending, just stating the facts. One disadvantage of typing on a forum versus speaking face to face, sometimes the gist of the statement doesn't come through. Please don't take it personally! :grin:
 

Dahila

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I am making skin products for over 3 years, but soaps maybe two years. I am not selling. I thought too; I got experience in lotions so soaps can not be more difficult. Well every batch I make I learn something new. This is why after two years of making soap I consider myself a newbie. I spend days on soapcalc , studying the properties of different oils.
BTW you use blend of olive oil with canola. It will be prone to DOS:) Good luck with soap :)
 
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nebetmiw

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Another problem not really mentioned is you are using liquid soap fragrance and colorant. This could be a good reason why it is so dry.
 

mjt123

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I have been making soap for about a year and I'm still trying to perfect it. I'm not going to sell it till I'm happy with it. I dont want to put people off buying homemade soap.
 

biarine

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I am making soap for 6 months now but still I never perfected even one recipe. I am making my own natural ( essential oil) perfume and massage oil for 8 years and people who try it said why you don't sell your product. I am afraid to do so. Still I am learning more every time. So keep practicing.
 

snappyllama

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I'll jump on the bandwagon about taking your time to learn before contemplating selling. I don't think anyone was intentionally being rude or condescending. The cool thing about making soap is all the variables where small things can make a big difference. It takes a lot of experience to make a quality product and there is always something new to learn. In addition, making good CP or HP simply takes time in that you have to try out new recipes, let them fully cure, and then ensure how they act at 2 months, 6 months, a year. You wouldn't want to tarnish your company's reputation selling something that sprouts DOS or loses all of its scent after your customer takes it home. Sorry if that's not the response you were seeking, but it comes from good intentions.

If you quickly need to add soap to your line, you might consider starting with melt and pour. There are some quality bases out there that have the benefit of removing the recipe guesswork - leaving you the fun of designing. Then you can take all the time you need to learn the craft of making CP/HP.

For the recipe you posted, I'd follow the other poster's recommendations. Learn to use SoapCalc and what the values mean. The beginner forum here has a wealth of information. Stick to 20% or under of CO as the high "cleansing" property is removing naturally occurring oils from your skin and leaving you with that unpleasant squeaky feeling.
 

Savvyssoaps

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I haven't sold anything yet, let's just clarify that. I don't see a problem with perfecting a recipe and selling that good product. I already have a business that I sell other skin care products through and now I'm trying to add soap in. There's no reason to be snarky about it. It's imperative that everyone start somewhere. Or am I wrong?





Also, as an added note: I've got 20 bars 10 from each batch that have been curing for about 6 weeks now. I tried them both earlier today which is what led me to seek advice. I know that soaps need to cure, maybe not for how long for each particular recipe, but I'm using my resources to LEARN. I'd appreciate if commenters refrained from rude and condescending comments.

I noticed people are really snarky to new people on here too. Don't worry you're not alone. We all start somewhere. Keep up the good work!
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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I have to say, if you go back and look at the comments earlier in this thread, no one was snarky and the advice was given in a friendly manner. Firm, maybe. Not what you wanted to hear, certainly. Snarky, not really.

As I have said before, people can either accept that the majority of people here WANT to help newbies but they also think that people should wait before selling, or they don't accept it. But the latter is throwing out the baby with the bath water.
 

Savvyssoaps

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I have to say, if you go back and look at the comments earlier in this thread, no one was snarky and the advice was given in a friendly manner. Firm, maybe. Not what you wanted to hear, certainly. Snarky, not really.

As I have said before, people can either accept that the majority of people here WANT to help newbies but they also think that people should wait before selling, or they don't accept it. But the latter is throwing out the baby with the bath water.
Oh I must have been confused when you said you're not snarky to new people, just to people who want to sell when they don't know how to make soap properly. Meaning you are in fact snarky to people....just not for the reason I listed.
MY MISTAKE :)
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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Oh I must have been confused when you said you're not snarky to new people, just to people who want to sell when they don't know how to make soap properly. Meaning you are in fact snarky to people....just not for the reason I listed.
MY MISTAKE :)
**SIGH** I was taking this thread as an example. But to be completely honest, mod or not, I really couldn't care less about whether or not people think I am snarky, sarcastic or in any other way mean spirited - I will help people with their soaping and bath and body activity as best as I can and in line with the site rules and my feelings on certain topics, such as pH testing, superfatting CP at trace and selling.
 

Jstar

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Im only seeing 2 snarky people in this thread, and its the 2 newcomers. You may not like the answers given, but that doesn't mean others were being 'snarky'...

The people here have a wealth of information they are willing to share, and part of learning soapmaking is how to do it 'properly' so others that use it aren't harmed. {and yes, its very possible}

Melt and Pour is NOT the same thing as CP/HP...there is ALOT more to it since CP/HP is actually 'making' soap..not using a premade base to melt and pour into molds {no diss towards the MP folks, just making a point}

If you come here asking questions, be prepared for the answers..if you don't like the answers, then move on. And no, that's not being 'snarky', that's being blunt and to the point honest.
 

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