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Goat Milk soap

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ngian

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Well this was my last soap for 2015 made a few days ago. I had only made one more time a milk soap when I first started soaping 1 year ago. It was used in a Castile soap as the remaining liquid of the 50% lye solution for a 33% lye concentration. I haven't used the bars much as I really don't like castile soap much. (I have a few bars left and I may use them now to see how they behave after 1 year).

So this time the recipe was:
Lard: 55%
Coconut Oil: 22%
Sunflower HO: 20%
Castor Oil: 3%

Lye Concentration: 33%
Lye discount:
a little less than 1%

And below you can see the ingredients in grams so as to understand the amounts used:
Water: 150gr
with salt 20gr(2%), sugar 50gr (5%), Sodium Citrate 40gr (4%) and when they were fully dissolved I then then added NaOH: 147,6gr



As you can see in this lye solution the NaOH could not be fully dissolved maybe because it was already a saturated water solution with the salt/sugar/SC. Water was clear prior inserting the NaOH. Have you also seen this phenomenon? What are you doing with those water soluble additives in a split method milk recipe where you have smaller amount of water? Do you dissolve them in milk instead?


At the same time 97gr Goat milk powder were added at 150gr Liquid Goat Milk (3,5% fat) and all of them along with 30gr Oatmeal flour were stick blended at oils:


First picture: milk/oatmeal flour mixed well into oils
Second & third picture: lye added to milk-oatmeal-oils (lactose started to react)

Finally FO Chocolate Fudge 20 gr (2%) was added at less than 1/2 of soap (~400gr) which decolorizes.

Lye & Oils where mixed @ 35°C & 40°C accordingly, a slow to trace recipe, CPOPed for 5 min @ 70°C and was unmolded and cut after 11 hours.


Little amount of vanilla powder was added as a topping decoration.

(to be continued...)
 
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ngian

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The bars where cut very nice and easily and the fragrance started to show its affect on the soap's color:





and a few days later it became darker...




One thing I noticed is that the darker part of soap that has more liquid because of the FO, it is much softer when I finger press it, as it testifies the softness a lower lye concentration gives to a soap bar at the same curing time.


So I can't wait to test it after two months.

Nikos
 

snappyllama

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I think those came out really nicely!

When I'm doing the split method....

Normally, I allocate some water out of my lye solution to mix all of my additives into a slurry until they are as dissolved as I can make them... milk powders, liquid milks, clays, oatmeal, sugar, EDTA, sodium lactate, etc. I then add my additive slurry directly to my oils and blend well before adding my lye solution.

My lye solution always has a little more plain water than lye to ensure that the lye can dissolve completely. About that only thing that goes in there is tussah silk so the lye can dissolve it.
 

ngian

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So after almost 3 months I have tried one bar, and it seems ok. Although I must test an identical recipe but without goat milk so as to understand what milk brings to the party.

So far I don't think I can feel something special, apart from the fact that the superfat has been for sure raised in contrast with the initial <1%.

After this batch I understand the need to use more coconut or castor when there is high amount of palmitic/stearic acids in the recipe.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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There was a blind test done by a member with one recipe but with either fresh gm, powdered or just plain water. People did not prefer either milk over the water one from the results that she got back, which is very interesting. I think any benefits from any enzymes are a long term thing
 
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