Tops flattening when insulated

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rbecca74

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So I've made 2 batches of soap last night. I have made these same batches before, same recipe. But I covered them shortly after molding. When I checked them, my pretty decorative tops looked like they deflated.... Any ideas? Am I covering it too soon?

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lsg

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Your soap may be overheating. Why not try putting the soap in the refrigerator or freezer to prevent gel?
 

shunt2011

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I too suspect it's overheating.
 

rbecca74

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It could be over heating. I use milk in almost every soap so far. I'm playing with different size batches, because almost every one has cracked. Although these didn't crack, they flattened. I don't a have freezer I can put them in to prevent feel, and I don't mix the lye and oil until it's around 90°. Is there something else I can do to make sure the soap gels but doesn't OVER heat?
 

galaxyMLP

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I was also thinking it was overheating. Now that you said you have milk in it it's even more probable. Since you are getting cracking regularly (also a sign of over heating) try not insulating at all.

Are you using full liquid or a liquid discount?
 

Krystalbee

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I'm going to hop on the overheating bandwagon. I made a coconut milk soap in the spring in which I piped the top, the batter overheated and the piping lost its shape. The poor top looked like it had melted/deflated, very similar to yours.
 

shunt2011

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I agree with galaxy, I would try not insulating it at all and see what happens. Putting a cover on it keeps the heat in and therefore causing your tops to flop.
 

kumudini

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I agree with everything that's said. I will add though, that if you use enough water discount and mix to a thick trace (which I do most of the time, I'm just SB happy that way) you may be able to save your tops while still avoiding the risk of partial gel with uninsulated batter.
 

quiltertoo

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I don't know how cold it gets in your part of Texas. I live in Missouri and I have soaped in the evening and then placed my soap outdoors on my deck over night to prevent gelling. It wasn't quite freezing temp. but was cold enough to prevent gel. A fan blowing on the soap will also keep it cooler.

Mary Lou
 

lsg

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When I use milk in my soap, I pop the soap in the freezer after putting it in the mold. I usually leave in the freezer for 12 hours, at least. This keeps it from overheating and discoloring.
 

gigisiguenza

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Since I'm still using full water, and I worry about it going into gel (which I don't want), I've been putting it in the fridge after pour. I don't have the room in my freezer either, so I put it in the fridge. It's been working for me so far.
 

rbecca74

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I was also thinking it was overheating. Now that you said you have milk in it it's even more probable. Since you are getting cracking regularly (also a sign of over heating) try not insulating at all.

Are you using full liquid or a liquid discount?
I am using a water discount. I don't insulate other thna placing a piece of cardboard on top of the wooden mold. I was thinking that my mold is too thick, but it's no thicker than most HDPE molds, or other wooden molds. It's still pretty warm here, although we have had some cooler weather here. Iput my finished soap into my Daughters' room because it's the coolest in the house.
 

dillsandwitch

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I have recently switched to wooden moulds from the silicone ones I was using. i have found that with my normal recipe that stays nice and cool in the silicone likes to get a bit too warm in the wooden moulds. I have this little desk fan that I stick pretty much on top of the soaps now in the wooden moulds and it keeps everything nice and cool. I never have space in my fridge or freezer for soaps.
 

rbecca74

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I'm looking locally for a small fridge that I can used dedicated to my soaps.I'm making about 2 batches/day to hopefully have gifts for Christmas ready. But my last batch last night got VERY hot. Didn't volcano, but looked like it wanted to. Was a carrot, honey, and milk. I know there is a lot of sugar in that one, even had a fan blowing directly on it. I wanted it to gel though.
 

cgpeanut

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I'm looking locally for a small fridge that I can used dedicated to my soaps.I'm making about 2 batches/day to hopefully have gifts for Christmas ready. But my last batch last night got VERY hot. Didn't volcano, but looked like it wanted to. Was a carrot, honey, and milk. I know there is a lot of sugar in that one, even had a fan blowing directly on it. I wanted it to gel though.
You could try a styrofoam cooler with a lid and with ice around the mold. See if that works.

Carrot has lots of sugar. that was your culprit.
 
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