Please advise

Discussion in 'Recipe Feedback' started by lsurrett2, Jan 22, 2018.

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  1. Jan 25, 2018 #21

    dixiedragon

    dixiedragon

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    According to my Googling, the stuff that floats to the top of the can of coconut milk is mostly fat and the stuff on the bottom is mostly water. So, you could let your can sit still a few days to separate, then put it in the fridge or freezer for a few hours. Open the can and lift out the cake of coconut cream/fat from the top. Weigh and include that as coconut oil and weigh the water and calculate it as water.
     
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  2. Jan 25, 2018 #22

    jcandleattic

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    Good point about actual silk (like made by silk worms) or silk, the soy milk replacement.
    However, my statement could work for both, because I have found my goat milk soaps in blind tests don't feel any more luxurious per-say - just a difference in the lather. However, there is the label appeal factor, and I just like making goats milk soaps, so I have some for those that will inevitably ask. :)
     
  3. Jan 25, 2018 #23

    DeeAnna

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    I'm certain this is true for some brands, but the coconut milk that is sold around my area apparently has additives in it to keep the fat and water from separating. I'm not sure the idea of letting the two layers separate will always work. Maybe the ingredients list might give a person a clue whether the CM will separate or not?

     
  4. Feb 11, 2018 #24

    lsurrett2

    lsurrett2

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    The bars I made are curing, but I decided to try them out, nice lather and not too drying.

    **note: not in my original recipe, I added 2T warmed honey mixed with 6T of water.

    On to my next question, I tried out the same recipe for CP. At trace, the color was creamy and light. When I added the honey at the end, right before the pour, the color turned orange (like carrot puree). I popped it in the freezer just in case, and it seems to have lightened some already. But I'm curious on why the honey would've caused orange-- any thoughts?
     
  5. Feb 11, 2018 #25

    earlene

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    The sugar and lye reacting to each other increased heat and produced the color.
     
  6. Feb 11, 2018 #26

    lsurrett2

    lsurrett2

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    Oh dear. It set up in the fridge, so I unmolded. Seems the honey settled to the bottom. I decided to cut, because I'm already thinking it needs to be re-batched.

    Before I do that, is that wise at this point or am I off base? Also what caused that? It did not happen when I use the recipe HP.
     
  7. Feb 11, 2018 #27

    shunt2011

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    It’s the sugar in the honey. Mine alWays does that but usually lightens upon cure. I gel mine on top of it but watch it closely. It should be fine
     
  8. Feb 11, 2018 #28

    penelopejane

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    Is the milk and extra water you used to mix the honey all part of the total amount of “water” in the recipe?
    It should be.

    It is a fine line with coconut oil soaps to get the temp low enough so as not to burn the milk and or burn the honey but high enough to keep the CO liquid.

    I would not use honey (especially so much) in a high CO soap.





     

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