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Discussion in 'The Introduction Forum' started by Edward Sebastian, Jan 17, 2020.

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  1. Jan 17, 2020 #1

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    My name is Eddie. This may be a strange introduction, on my part, but my doctor thought I should pick a hobby, and as I'm an artistically creative person, I thought soap making always looked fun to me and I figured, why not?. I've been researching and reading all kinds of materials about the subject, and would like to jump in, but I'd like to pick brains here. I'd like to know the ins and outs of shopping for supplies, that won't break my wallet in half, of course. It seems like so much to buy, but that could just be me. Anyway, I hope to get acquainted with you all, and get better insight into soaping. Peace and Love FullSizeRender.jpg
     
  2. Jan 17, 2020 #2

    IrishLass

    IrishLass

    IrishLass

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    Welcome, Edward! [​IMG]

    You can make perfectly wonderful soap out of oils and fats you can get at your local grocery store or Walmart, and depending on where you live, you might be able to find lye at your local hardware store......for example, my local Lowe's and Home Depot stopped carrying it because of the methheads in our area using it to make meth. My local Ace still carries the Rooto-brand lye which is good for soap-making, although the last time I bought it there the cashier looked me over suspiciously while at the same time trying to not look at me so suspiciously, and asked me what I would be using it for. lol It was pretty funny how nonchalant he was trying to be about it but failing miserably at it. I told him I was making soap with it and that satisfied him. I buy my lye online now.


    IrishLass :)
     
  3. Jan 17, 2020 #3

    Millie

    Millie

    Millie

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    Welcome Edward! The most expensive part of the hobby is fragrance (for me at least). If it weren't for that it would be one of the cheaper hobbies... so if you have some self restraint and wait for fragrance sales or start out going unscented while you play around with your formula you'll be ok.

    It is convenient to always have lovely soaps on hand for gifts. It is also just a really satisfying hobby. You could try a simple batch for very little cost and see if you like it. My first batch was just coconut oil and lye with a cardboard box for a mold. Not my favorite soap but I was instantly hooked. I was so excited that it really made bubbles, ha!

    IrishLass' post just popped up, that is so funny. I still get my lye from Tractor Supply store with no funny looks.... yet ;)
     
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  4. Jan 17, 2020 #4

    Ladka

    Ladka

    Ladka

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    I also started out going unscented so it was inexpensive. Beside, I have access to cheap beef and pork fat that I render myself to tallow and lard. I also used various used small plastic package items as individual moulds.
     
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  5. Jan 17, 2020 #5

    ShirleyHailstock

    ShirleyHailstock

    ShirleyHailstock

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    I started about a year ago, making melt and pour soap, but after reading so much online about Cold Process, I wanted to try it. I came across some fragrance sales after Christmas in 2018 and used them in my first batch. They worked well. Then I began buying fragrance online. The forum taught me to READ very carefully before ordering because a batch of soap I made turned out chocolate and very soft. It's hardening as it cures and the smell is faint, but pleasant. I find the people on the forum sooo helpful.
     
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  6. Jan 17, 2020 #6

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    HAHAAA ! That's hilarious. I live in Connecticut. Not really sure about Meth Heads around here, but I hope I don't get asked, cause I'm such a goof, I'd probably say something like, "My parole officer said to say it's for soap making" and then wink at them... LOL. Disclaimer: I've never been arrested... so no actual parole officer was harmed in this example... ;)

    That's great. I really want to figure out how many time do you have to resupply? and how much of it, so as mot to keep buying ingredients just to make a batch. Not sure if I said that coherently... lol.

    I'm not much of a meat person, but I understand how you can repurpose ingredients. thank you

    That's fantastic, Shirley. Thank you so much for that.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2020
  7. Jan 17, 2020 #8

    Zany_in_CO

    Zany_in_CO

    Zany_in_CO

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    Howdy from Colorado USA!
    There are many Newbies and Semi-newbies here so you are in good company. You might want to take some time to read info posted on the Beginner's Forum -- especially the Stickies. There's lots of good information there to help you. Take a cuppa along and scroll down to Lovin' Soap Studio to get a handle on most of the stuff we talk about here.

    Most of the equipment you need you probably already have in your kitchen, with the exception of a stick blender which you might find at a thrift store or Walmart, Target, etc. You can use a whisk to bring soap to trace, but a stick blender is faster.

    LYE: Look for Rooto "100% sodium hydroxide" (lye) locally at the hardware store or big box stores (drain cleaner). For very little expense, you can buy lard at the grocery store which makes a fine bar of soap all by itself. Costco has good prices on Olive Oil and Coconut Oil. They also had soy oil and avocado oil the last time I was there.

    Plan on making small 1 pound (500 grams) batches at first to get the hang of it.
    Run all recipes through a calculator like SoapCalc first.
    You can get feedback by starting a new thread on the Recipe Feedback Forum (non-soap items too).

    To save time, money, and frustration, this is a good read for a soaper at your stage of experience:
    Q: What advice would you give to your beginning soaping self?

    DeeAnna's Soapy Stuff is a good read for Newbies & experienced soapers alike.
    https://classicbells.com/soap/soapyStuff.asp

    The best way to search SMF: GOOGLE
    (type your keywords here) site:soapmakingforum.com
    If you want to search for a phrase, put the phrase in quotes.
    You can include individual words along with phrases

    If you have problems, feel free to contact our Administrators by clicking on their names or avatars: Angie, Irish Lass, Relle, lsg, Shunt 2011

    HAPPY SOAPING! :)
     
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  8. Jan 17, 2020 #8

    Steve85569

    Steve85569

    Steve85569

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    Welcome Eddie!
    As to how often I need to re-supply it depends on how many soapy experiments I am involved in. When I started it was more often than it is now.
    I have settled in on just a couple of recipes that my family and I like so i now use a smaller array of oils than when starting as well.
    I do still have to watch that I don't run out of the hydroxide that I am using ( usually sodium hydroxide) but I have the local Ace Hardware guy bribed well enough with product that he always has a coup;e pounds in the back for me.

    You will find that ANY oil will cause you to wonder "what kind of soap would this make" - don't worry it's normal for us.
    Also you'll probably find yourself looking at random objects and wondering if they would make a good soap mold. It's just a normal part of developing your own soap making style.

    Lots of very patient and knowledgeable teachers here !
     
  9. Jan 18, 2020 #9

    lsg

    lsg

    lsg

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    Welcome to the forum. Eddie, your local Dollar Tree may have many of the supplies and some of the oils. A cheap stick blender from Walmart works well. I used one for years before I wore it out. You can use individual cavity silicone molds or a Velveeta box or a 1/2 gallon milk carton for molding your soap. You may be able to buy sodium hydroxide at your local hardware store in the drain cleaner section. Just make sure it says 100% sodium hydroxide on the label. No need to break the bank when just starting out. I do not recommend fragrance or essential oils from craft shops such as Hobby Lobby. They may not be intended for use in CP soap. Good luck with the soap making.:)
     
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  10. Jan 18, 2020 #10

    Relle

    Relle

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    Welcome Eddie :).
     
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  11. Jan 18, 2020 #11

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    Awesome! Thanks!
     
  12. Jan 18, 2020 #12

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    Everything is looking like molds to me, without realizing it... LOL! Thanks for the help.
     
  13. Jan 18, 2020 #13

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    I already have some molds that I bought about a year ago, along with a scale, stick blender, bowls. I just haven't taken the plunge to get in on the soaping action...lol
     
  14. Jan 18, 2020 #14

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    THANKS!!
     
  15. Jan 18, 2020 #15

    Jennifer Horne

    Jennifer Horne

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    Welcome!
    I started with soaping101's dollar tree soap videos bought all my supplies at the dollar tree, except my scale and my stick blender.
     
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  16. Jan 18, 2020 #16

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

    Edward Sebastian

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    Thank You.
     

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