Over-cooked soap

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allane

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I do hp soaps exclusively. I have nothing against cold process but I am not as patient as some of our talented soapmakers here. Lately, I have been reading a lot about how we should avoid over-cooked soap. My question is that if the monster lye has done all the damage it can during the saponification process, what more damage can occur?

I am not talking about cooking with high heat to burn the soap nor using too much heat for your water to evaporate. I am referring to cooking to a translucent stage where the soap pours easily without any extra additives. Am I doing harm to my soap? Thanks for any imputs.

Grace
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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Aye, as above. Also, if it is clear, zapless, and pourable then it is fine at that point. The overcooking being less to do with more saponification, rather driving out more moisture and damaging the unsaponified oils. Also, it just wastes time!
 

IrishLass

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I am not talking about cooking with high heat to burn the soap nor using too much heat for your water to evaporate. I am referring to cooking to a translucent stage where the soap pours easily without any extra additives. Am I doing harm to my soap? Thanks for any imputs.

Grace
Hi Grace. I just want to make sure I understand correctly..... When you say 'translucent stage', do you mean the 'gel-stage'? I ask because I always cook mine to the gel stage and continue cooking a little more until it doesn't zap anymore. My cooked batter looks pretty translucent at this point as long as I didn't add any colorants to it, and it is also about as liquid at this point as it's ever going to get. Any cooking done past this point will only serve to evaporate more water off and make the soap more difficult to pour.


IrishLass :)
 

allane

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Hi Grace. I just want to make sure I understand correctly..... When you say 'translucent stage', do you mean the 'gel-stage'? I ask because I always cook mine to the gel stage and continue cooking a little more until it doesn't zap anymore. My cooked batter looks pretty translucent at this point as long as I didn't add any colorants to it, and it is also about as liquid at this point as it's ever going to get. Any cooking done past this point will only serve to evaporate more water off and make the soap more difficult to pour.


IrishLass :)
Hello Irishlass, this is exactly what I meant but unable to express myself well ( English being a third language). At least I feel good knowing that I am not the only one who makes soap this way. Thanks everyone for your imput.

Grace
 

dixiedragon

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Can you link to what you have been reading about overcooked soap? When I think of over-cooked hot process, I am referring to the hard, waxy bits that I scrape off the sides of the crockpot. They are firm and don't pour, but I just poke them under the liquid part so they aren't on top of the soap, and they are fine. I think it's just cosmetic?
 

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