Quantcast

Natural Lotion Making Ingredients

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
I just wanted to share this:

"NATURAL ALTERNATIVES TO CHEMICALS
How do I determine what is really “NATURAL" AND "ORGANIC"?
Read the labels! You need to know what you’re looking for.
On any label, ingredients are listed in descending order of the quantity used in the product. One should look at the first third of the label for the emulsion and its natural and organic ingredients. As the body of the product, the emulsion sets the tone for other additives including the herbal extracts. In most other skin care products, this is also where its chemicals are listed. Some of the chemicals usually found in skin care products are stearyl and cetyl alcohol, dimethicone and TEA. These may be followed by a series of herb and plant extracts to make the product sound and look natural.

Regardless of a skin care product being synthetic or natural, the following four categories are the fundamental base of the product..."

See the site: http://www.rarenatural.com/education.php for the specific categories and examples of synthetic ingredients and natural alternatives.
 
G

Guest

the lotions that I make contain a specific % of oils and butters

my liquid is either aloe vera juice either with or without GM, but i want to also make one with coconut milk as well.

I use a bit of glycerin, stearic acid and emulsifying wax.

Then of course a preservative and I also like the scented ones better just cause I get hung up on the scent aspect. And fragrance oils can be so much fun !!!!


but overall you need to look at the labels and decide for yourself. What i get a kick out of is those that sell their handmade lotion and they list an ingredient list and you just know it was a pre-made base. But they added a scent and suddenly it's handmade.

Sorry i get hung up on the handmade and handcrafted issue. But that's just me.
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
faithy said:
the lotions that I make contain a specific % of oils and butters

my liquid is either aloe vera juice either with or without GM, but i want to also make one with coconut milk as well.

I use a bit of glycerin, stearic acid and emulsifying wax.

Then of course a preservative and I also like the scented ones better just cause I get hung up on the scent aspect. And fragrance oils can be so much fun !!!!


but overall you need to look at the labels and decide for yourself. What i get a kick out of is those that sell their handmade lotion and they list an ingredient list and you just know it was a pre-made base. But they added a scent and suddenly it's handmade.

Sorry i get hung up on the handmade and handcrafted issue. But that's just me.
No apologies needed. :) I love informational sites and thought this was good stuff people should know. A lot of people don't even know what to look for or read a list and don't know what they are looking at. Although we're mostly makers here now and not prone to buying commercially made lotions...good info to know. I know what you mean, about premade bases. And (just my personal preference) even those that I trust that make more natural lotion bases to sell...I'd rather make my own...to ensure the right stuff goes in and the wrong stuff never touches it. 8) I have learned recently that glycerin and emulsifying wax can be vegan. And stearic acid...I believe is too. So, that's great! I have been using stearic acid myself. I thought I had read somewhere recently that stearic acid isn't an emulsifier...but some informational sites I have read...said otherwise. What do you think about that? I have have never used emulsifying wax or any wax and have made some pretty good creams. From what I read somewhere recently...adding more water...could give me more of a basic lotion consistency. What do you think?
 
G

Guest

yes there is a vegetable based glycerin, so you need to read what you buy in case some one is trying to pass off a petroleum based one. (such as what is cast off from that fuel conversion thing but that makes lousy soap from what I have read. Never was tempted to use that type. I'll stick with the vetebale based glycerin.

Stearic acid isn't an emulsifyer it's actually a thickener or hardener. (But if you look on a commercial bar of soap steric acid ranks top 5 ingredients. Now that can't be good!!!)

I don't agree with adding more water. At least with not knowing specific amounts exactly with lotions and creams.

From what I have read, or also what I like to do is to keep everything in perspective of a %. Sorta like writing a soap recipe in terms of a %. Infact I use soap cal to figure out my lotion recipes as well !!!!!

I've just got a minute here but i can write more on it later. But a good lotion has between 10% and 25% oils and butters. And good values for glycerin, stearic acid and e-wax are between 3% and 6% depending on taste. And the remainder is your preservative, fragrance, liquid or anything else you may want to include.

ok gotta run but i can write more on it later.
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
faithy said:
yes there is a vegetable based glycerin, so you need to read what you buy in case some one is trying to pass off a petroleum based one. (such as what is cast off from that fuel conversion thing but that makes lousy soap from what I have read. Never was tempted to use that type. I'll stick with the vetebale based glycerin.

Stearic acid isn't an emulsifyer it's actually a thickener or hardener. (But if you look on a commercial bar of soap steric acid ranks top 5 ingredients. Now that can't be good!!!)

I don't agree with adding more water. At least with not knowing specific amounts exactly with lotions and creams.

From what I have read, or also what I like to do is to keep everything in perspective of a %. Sorta like writing a soap recipe in terms of a %. Infact I use soap cal to figure out my lotion recipes as well !!!!!

I've just got a minute here but i can write more on it later. But a good lotion has between 10% and 25% oils and butters. And good values for glycerin, stearic acid and e-wax are between 3% and 6% depending on taste. And the remainder is your preservative, fragrance, liquid or anything else you may want to include.

ok gotta run but i can write more on it later.
Thanks! I just recently learned about creating formulas by percentages. I like it. And will make my life easier, for sure. I guess, about adding water...I was assuming specific percentages were used. What other way would you thin the consistency of a cream or lotion? I am a sponge. I love information! :lol: Thus, I ask an inifinite amount of questions. LOL
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
faithy said:
yes there is a vegetable based glycerin, so you need to read what you buy in case some one is trying to pass off a petroleum based one. (such as what is cast off from that fuel conversion thing but that makes lousy soap from what I have read. Never was tempted to use that type. I'll stick with the vetebale based glycerin.

Stearic acid isn't an emulsifyer it's actually a thickener or hardener. (But if you look on a commercial bar of soap steric acid ranks top 5 ingredients. Now that can't be good!!!)

I don't agree with adding more water. At least with not knowing specific amounts exactly with lotions and creams.

From what I have read, or also what I like to do is to keep everything in perspective of a %. Sorta like writing a soap recipe in terms of a %. Infact I use soap cal to figure out my lotion recipes as well !!!!!

I've just got a minute here but i can write more on it later. But a good lotion has between 10% and 25% oils and butters. And good values for glycerin, stearic acid and e-wax are between 3% and 6% depending on taste. And the remainder is your preservative, fragrance, liquid or anything else you may want to include.

ok gotta run but i can write more on it later.
The stearic acid from vegetable oils seems okay to use. Not synthetic or derived from animals. Right? I have made creams with just jojoba oil, water and stearic acid (the vegan type) and it emulsified pretty well. But I read just a minute ago...that one natural emulsifier is Jojoba wax. Could the fact that the oil coming from the wax of Jojoba...is why the recipe was able to emulsify? Just curious. Having a hard time wrapping my mind around Stearic acid not being an emulsifier...when my results have shown different.
-----------
Edited
------------
I found this site that refers to stearic acid as another emulsifier. http://allnaturalbeauty.us/ani3.htm :? I'm confused! :lol:
 

Soapmaker Man

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2007
Messages
3,006
Reaction score
87
Location
SW Missouri
Erin as Faithy said stearic acid is not a emulsifier, only a thickening agent. I do use veggie stearic acid in my lotions, creams and emulsified butters. My butters are made with butters only and only 55% water the rest butters, e-wax, stearic acid, and a few other skin loving and conditioning goodies. I sometimes use stearic acid in my soaps fir hardness. I have one recipe high in linoleic acid and in oleic acid and has high conditioning numbers, but is a little soft for my tastes. I use 4% stearic acid to raise the hardness numbers. I don't know if I like making my homemade soap, or lotions and creams, from scratch better? :?

I do love making everything from scratch and knowing exactly what is in every bar of soap or jar of lotion I make and sell. :D

I'll send you a bar of my soap and a bottle of thick cream with your mold order! What scents do you like best?
I'll send a sample lotion recipe and a soap recipe too. :wink:
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
Location
Wisconsin
I am glad Paul mentioned the stearic acid thing... not all stearic acid is bad. Just like citric acid isn't bad. We just need to know the source of our ingredients. I personally love to make thicker creams without water and body butters without water... but my favorite is a thinner lotion that I can use on my face. If water isn't added you usually get a greasier product. Depending on the oils used, the grease will probably soak into your skin in time, but I have always liked a thinner lotion. the probably with using water is that you are supposed to use a preservative. Most people use Germall or Germaben or something similar, but they are not natural. I haven't started selling lotion yet for this reason. Anything without water I am not really too concerned about - I just use a very basic natural preservative. But for me, the jury is still out as to what to use for my own natural preservative system.
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
Soapmaker Man said:
Erin as Faithy said stearic acid is not a emulsifier, only a thickening agent. I do use veggie stearic acid in my lotions, creams and emulsified butters. My butters are made with butters only and only 55% water the rest butters, e-wax, stearic acid, and a few other skin loving and conditioning goodies. I sometimes use stearic acid in my soaps fir hardness. I have one recipe high in linoleic acid and in oleic acid and has high conditioning numbers, but is a little soft for my tastes. I use 4% stearic acid to raise the hardness numbers. I don't know if I like making my homemade soap, or lotions and creams, from scratch better? :?

I do love making everything from scratch and knowing exactly what is in every bar of soap or jar of lotion I make and sell. :D

I'll send you a bar of my soap and a bottle of thick cream with your mold order! What scents do you like best?
I'll send a sample lotion recipe and a soap recipe too. :wink:
Thanks! I would love to try yours! I am still stumped as to why my cream emulsified, without an emulsifier, then.
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
NaturalSoapGirl said:
I am glad Paul mentioned the stearic acid thing... not all stearic acid is bad. Just like citric acid isn't bad. We just need to know the source of our ingredients. I personally love to make thicker creams without water and body butters without water... but my favorite is a thinner lotion that I can use on my face. If water isn't added you usually get a greasier product. Depending on the oils used, the grease will probably soak into your skin in time, but I have always liked a thinner lotion. the probably with using water is that you are supposed to use a preservative. Most people use Germall or Germaben or something similar, but they are not natural. I haven't started selling lotion yet for this reason. Anything without water I am not really too concerned about - I just use a very basic natural preservative. But for me, the jury is still out as to what to use for my own natural preservative system.
I can understand the reluctantcy (sp) to use water...due to the preservative issue. I am still on the fence. Because...I like body butters and lotion bars...but still really want a good, thinner lotion for general use (not the face though).
 

busymammaof3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
295
Reaction score
0
I have made creams with just jojoba oil, water and stearic acid and it emulsified pretty well. How is that possible, since stearic acid isn't an emulsifier? I apologize if this was already answered. But didn't see one to this particular Q. I'm not trying argue. Just seriously wanting to know the reason behind the reaction of the ingredients I used. Been about a month now and it's still not seperating.
 
Top