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Is homemade laundry soap really a good idea?

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DeeAnna

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Don't put acids in the wash water if you're using regular lye-based soap. Acids cause the soap to break down so it doesn't function properly. Use acids only in the rinse water.

Borax or washing soda in the wash water are useful. Baking soda is a waste of money. Borax or washing soda are far more effective.
 

Dahila

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Don't put acids in the wash water if you're using regular lye-based soap. Acids cause the soap to break down so it doesn't function properly. Use acids only in the rinse water.

Borax or washing soda in the wash water are useful. Baking soda is a waste of money. Borax or washing soda are far more effective.
I think addition of Vinegar is used for the last rinse at least mine is taken almost on finishing the program
I wash once cycle from time to time without any clothes just with a two cups of vinegar, to clean and deodorize
 

DeeAnna

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For most people, you're right, @Dahila. But I know for certain some people do say they add acid to the wash water, not the rinse. A post a little earlier in this thread seemed to be saying that. So just in case, I thought I'd chime in.
 
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gloopygloop

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I switched back to detergents after making my own laundry soap. I just don't like my clothing looking extra dingy. Even when I had the enzymes, the oxiclean, the washing soda and borax.
That really surprises me as I find totally the reverse. I use a chelator in the actual soap along with washing soda and oxcybleach put into the machine, the glass on the front of the machine is not covered in scum so it seems to be working. Laundry is definitely cleaner than when using a detergent. I find soap to be a far more effective cleanser than detergent as long as it has the additives to counteract the the hardness of the water. I also think its important not to be mean with the amount of soap you put into the machine, plus I have not found mixing / grinding it all up together as a master batch works as the particle sizes are different and they tend to separate out where the fine ones sink to the bottom etc. Much better to add each component to the machine in separate scoops so that you know you have the correct and desired dose.
And by the way I am not one of the Gals I am one of the Guys!!! but the washing still has to be done! (sadly).
 

Rembetissa

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If the vinegar thing was referring to me, sorry for not being clear. I thought the earlier post saying everyone assumed everyone added vinegar meant in the rinse.
 

DeeAnna

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If the vinegar thing was referring to me, sorry for not being clear. I thought the earlier post saying everyone assumed everyone added vinegar meant in the rinse.
Not sure what post it was that made me uncertain, and it doesn't really matter. What does matter is I was getting a little doubtful as I read along what people meant, and I suspect others might be unsure too. We get a lot of newcomers here, and not everyone realizes acids shouldn't be mixed with lye-based soap in the wash water. Best to be clear so everyone is on the same page, rather than assume.
 

Shaylyn Valdez

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Maybe I’m just doomed to itchy skin!

How do you add vinegar to your rinse water when you don’t have your own washer? I’m not able to open the machine during cycle.
 

Arimara

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Maybe I’m just doomed to itchy skin!

How do you add vinegar to your rinse water when you don’t have your own washer? I’m not able to open the machine during cycle.
You'd put the vinegar where the fabric softener is supposed to go.

Sadly, I'm stuck flip-flopping between Method and All (my backup detergeant). Method has caused me the least issues to date. I've also tried Ever Spring (Target exclusive, I think). They have a free and clear detergent that was pretty good.

That really surprises me as I find totally the reverse. I use a chelator in the actual soap along with washing soda and oxcybleach put into the machine, the glass on the front of the machine is not covered in scum so it seems to be working. Laundry is definitely cleaner than when using a detergent. I find soap to be a far more effective cleanser than detergent as long as it has the additives to counteract the the hardness of the water. I also think its important not to be mean with the amount of soap you put into the machine, plus I have not found mixing / grinding it all up together as a master batch works as the particle sizes are different and they tend to separate out where the fine ones sink to the bottom etc. Much better to add each component to the machine in separate scoops so that you know you have the correct and desired dose.
And by the way I am not one of the Gals I am one of the Guys!!! but the washing still has to be done! (sadly).
I made a liquid laundry soap after making bars. The bars are more limiting for me.
 
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Zany_in_CO

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When my daughter was 4 years old she broke out in a rash all over her body. The doctor recommended to wash everything -- clothes, bed linens -- in DREFT laundry detergent. Worked like a charm. At that time it was in powder form and only one choice. Now it comes in liquid form and a bunch of different choices.

HTH
 

Orla

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As part of my soapmaking journey, I have been very interested in making my own laundry soap, HOWEVER... while doing my research I’ve discovered that many believe homemade laundry detergent to be something to avoid, claiming that when you use homemade laundry soap, it builds up on clothes and does not completely rinse off, and encourages the growth of bacteria. This is said to be because detergent and soap are two different things, and soap does not wash off clothes well. My question would be this: Is there any truth to this? Perhaps a possible workaround? Would making liquid laundry soap maybe make it easier for it to wash off?

What are your thoughts or ideas on this? I would love to hear them!
Here's a thing. I checked this site to see what people might say on this subject. In France what they do is make 100 coconut oil soap. Grate it with a machine when it's ready. Boil water - double the amount of soap - and at .8 ratio, salt. When your saline solution is ready put in soap shavings for 30 mins or so and let them boil. Rinse like mad and then spread it all out on some dishcloth or something and leave out to dry in the sun. This process supposedly gets rid of remaining glycerin. Then you can use 50g of this soap to a litre of water and mix in perhaps 10% bicarbonate of soda OR percarbonate of soda (for whites, sorry, too tired to look up US names) or soda crystals. Lot of happy French soapers with that recipe... No borax or anything horrible...
 

SoapySuds

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I make my own laundry detergent and have been for 4-5 years now.

I originally made it with fels naphtha, and then baking soda, washing soda, sodium per carbonate (the stuff that makes oxiclean oxiclean), borax and mixed it and used two tablespoons for a large load of clothes. Three if the clothes were super dingy. When the grocery store stopped selling fels, I began using my utility soap. Have to use twice as much grated bar soap because of the glycerin in the soap, however, I don't have to use fabric softener.

Cat piss smell disappears with baking soda. Blood stains go away with sodium per carbonate. Washing soda makes a high PH. Borax makes chelators. And the soap does it's soapy thing.

We have hard water and an older washing machine.

I do not over load the washing machine with clothes. There has to be space for all the clothes to mix around in the water and get soap on them and then rinse well.

It depends on how you load your machine and how much soap you are using.

Do you smash the clothes in for a full load? Do you fill it with water and then add the clothes until you can't get anymore in? - These will often lead to an overloaded washing machine and your clothes don't get as clean.

Then there's the other issue of too much 'cleaner' for your clothes!

I hate to inform you, but if your clothes come out smelling like your detergent, there is still detergent on your clothes! If your clothes have white streaks on them from your powdered detergent or soap, you have one of a few problems: 1. Too much detergent. 2. Not enough space for the water and clothes. 3. Washing in cold water or *NOT washing for long enough time (detergent needs to dissolve in the water)

Not all problems are related to the detergent or soap you use.


*edit
 
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