Quantcast

Favorite cauliflower sauce for pasta

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

mishmish

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2016
Messages
132
Reaction score
112
I lived in Italy for 20+ years and pasta is a fall-back for when we're in a hurry for dinner. This is a variation on the olive oil/garlic/parmesan late night standby: Heat the oven to 450 F and put on a pot of salted water to boil. Cut up a head of cauliflower into itty bitty pieces - you want a lot of tiny flat thin pieces. Toss them with a little olive oil and minced garlic. Put them in thin layers on a couple of baking sheets (I use parchment paper on two sheets). Bake them until they start to brown, turning them with a spatula a couple of times (about 20 minutes). The quantity of cauliflower really diminishes and the flavor gets more concentrated. When they're about two thirds cooked, I add 1/4 cup of pinenuts (Costco sells big bags of them and I keep them in the freezer). While the cauliflower is roasting, I heat another couple of Tablespoons of olive oil in a pan big enough to hold everything, and saute more minched garlic - usually 4 or 5 cloves (don't brown the garlic or it gets bitter) - and a dried hot red pepper if you like, and then add a handful of breadcrumbs, let them cook a few seconds in the hot oil. Then add the cooked califlower, adjust the salt and pepper. Cook the spaghetti and drain it but retain some of the cooking water. Turn the heat back on under the cauliflower and add the pasta, enough of the cooking water to loosen it up as you turn it, and parmesan cheese to taste. It's really good. Sometimes I'll add a little butter to it at the end too.
 

KimW

Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
933
Reaction score
1,368
Location
Michigan, USA
Thank you for sharing - sounds absolutely delicious! Always on the lookout for tried and true recipes.

scoobdrool.gif
 

mishmish

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2016
Messages
132
Reaction score
112
Italians are very picky about their pasta, ime. I like thin spaghetti for this, but you could do it with other types of pasta that have ripples or hollows to pick up the vegetables. It's not a "sauce" per se because it's not liquid, but the softness of the cauliflower and the binding power of the bread crumbs/olive oil/cheese makes it cling to the pasta. That's why you need a little of the cooking water at the end, too.
 
Top