Deodorizing Tallow

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porter93

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Hello,
I have just completed my first wet render-purification method of a bunch of tallow I receive and have been left with a slight beef smell.

My process was-
Cook fat + water + salt in a crockpot for around 4 hours until all liquid.
Strain all gristly meaty bits from the mixture with a wire strainer.
Cool mixture of oil and water at room temp until fat is solid.
Add solid fat back to crockpot with water and salt for 2hr to purify.
Pour mix through cheese cloth + strainer.
Repeat again.

Product is white and seems very pure but has a slight beef smell (nothing overpowering but strong enough to put some people off).

Is there any tricks of the trade I can use to get rid of this smell, maybe some gentle additives or more salt or cook for longer?

Thanks, Ryan.
 

Zany_in_CO

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Hi @porter93 ! and WELCOME!

@LynetteO is correct. Oakmoss works for neutralizing the odor of animal fats in soap.

In addition, rendering tallow has been discussed many times here. Use the Search button on the Menu at the top right of this page to learn more. :thumbs: ;)
 
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Oakmoss is a skin sensitizer, so you should do some reading first on safe usage guidelines.

Are you planning to make soap with the tallow? If so, the scent may vanish in the process. I can usually still smell lard after using it to make soap, but I do not notice any residual beefy scent when using tallow. Could just be my nose though.
 

earlene

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Just a precaution based on your location, @porter93:

From what I read here at SMF, Oak Moss is restricted in the UK, so before you start looking for it, I suggest you find out if it is even allowed to be used in your country in whatever product you plan to make, such as soap. It is no longer allowed to be used in perfume in the EU, and many other usage rates are restricted in the UK due to sensitivities to UK citizens. (see this study) Here is a link to a pdf listing Oakmoss usage rates by category of product per IFRA standards: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct..._STD_067.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3Bk509mmftSzuZ_oXvuIqD (Soap falls into category 9.)

However, what I read here says, that products containing atronol and chloroatrantol (found in oak moss) cannot be sold in the European marketplace. I don't know what that means specifically for the UK since you are no longer a member of the EU, but it would impact any sales outside your country.

It appears that it is still sold in the UK here: Oakmoss Essential Oil, but the MSDS shows a warning symbol that is required when labeling a product containing it, which I would think would make the product less saleable. For makers who may be considering purchasing, IMO reading those handling warnings on the MSDS would be wise before making a decision.
 
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If you don't mind, I'll make a few suggestions. Perhaps you do these things, as well, but I didn't see any mention of these steps in the description of your process. If you haven't tried them, I highly recommend that you do.

1. Add a bit of baking soda with the salt and water; it does help with deodorizing the fat.

2. After straining off the bits, and while the liquid fat + water+ salt + bicarb is simmering on low heat, skim off the foamy stuff that comes to the top. Yes, it is a time-consuming, sweat-producing process to stand over the stove for 30-45 minutes until the batch stops foaming. However, skimming the foam removes a large amount of impurities before the final strain through cheesecloth.

3. After everything has cooled, put it in the fridge or freezer till the fat is hard. Remove the fat chunk, turn it over, and scrape off the discolored bits from the bottom. Toss out the murky water that was left in the container. Then repeat the entire process with clean water (with salt and bicarb added) until there is no more gunk on the bottom of the cooled fat chunk, and the water underneath it is clear.
 

Zany_in_CO

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Oakmoss is a skin sensitizer, so you should do some reading first on safe usage guidelines.
However, what I read here says, that products containing atronol and chloroatrantol (found in oak moss) cannot be sold in the European marketplace. I don't know what that means specifically
This post contains info about the use rate of oakmoss absolute.


Oakmoss absolute is a common anchor in "accords" in the perfume industry. It does work well in that capacity. Perfume is a leave on product and I believe the EU restrictions are targeted for that industry.

That's not to say that it won't be sensitizing to some in a wash off product like soap. Used judiciously at a very low rate (0.7% of a 10% dilution, or 0.07%) should allay any cause for concern.
 
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