Coconut free soap??

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csculley

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I typically make all of my soaps with a base of coconut, olive oil, and palm oil. I have a client that approached me and asked me to make a coconut and coconut derivative free soap. I only have one set of equipment and clean it after each use with soap, water, and white vinegar. Do you think that I can make a coconut-free soap and use the same equipment? I clean my pot and tools very well, but I suppose some coconut could still be left behind.

Does anyone have any experience in making soaps free of an oil for an allergy and still use the same equipment?

Thanks in advance!!
 

Steve85569

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The safe answer is no.

If the reason to make coconut ( and palm) free soap is allergies the risk of having even a minute bit of the agent left is there and along with it your risk. I know a gent that can't eat in a cafe where shrimp is cooked because of allergic reaction. Sends him to the hospital.

Head for the dollar store and pick up a pitcher to make a batch of CP for your client. You can fit 45 ounces of oil in one and still SB. Line your mold too.

JM2cents,
Steve
 

Arimara

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The safe answer is no.

If the reason to make coconut ( and palm) free soap is allergies the risk of having even a minute bit of the agent left is there and along with it your risk. I know a gent that can't eat in a cafe where shrimp is cooked because of allergic reaction. Sends him to the hospital.

Head for the dollar store and pick up a pitcher to make a batch of CP for your client. You can fit 45 ounces of oil in one and still SB. Line your mold too.

JM2cents,
Steve
I was actually thinking along the same lines but since I am not planning on selling, I wasn't sure to give an answer.
 

Susie

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I would tell him the cost of the bowl and mold, and explain to him that the only way you would feel safe making soap for him is to have a dedicated set of equipment just for him. If he is willing to pay for it, then go for it. I would be sure to write his name on everything to avoid accidental contamination.
 

mymy

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susie's suggestion is great but I'll consider the equipments that i have to buy to make co free soap as investment.
 

Susie

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If you don't sell, like Arimara, then the investment is a cost that will not be paid by other people purchasing CO free soap. In that particular instance, I would let the person requesting the CO free soap know the cost (which I would buy extremely low cost items) in order to make them soap. I don't see that as a difficult or problematic thing to do. I would label it with that person's name in order to protect them.

However, if you sell soap, then it would indeed be an investment. As it should be. You are the manufacturer, and you sell the product. Equipment is part of the overhead.
 

dixiedragon

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That would get pretty pricey if you include the stick blender in that. I'd present the client with two options:

You use your regular equipment to make a batch of coconut-free soap. Tell him/her you'll hand wash everything thoroughly, then run it through the dishwasher twice.
He/she buys the equipment. Give a list of the equipment and how much it will cost. If you get a stick blender with the removable wand that can be washed in the dishwasher, you client can buy one for you to use just for them, and then take it home and use it for food.
 

nsmar4211

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How big of a client is this client? Seems that's what it boils down to.
 

penelopejane

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Also ask the person how particular he needs to be. I wouldn't think a separate stick blender was required, but it's probably an individual thing.
 
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csculley

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Thanks!

Thank you everyone for your reply... This customer has never bought from me and I figured that if she was asking for a special order she would want to purchase a lot, but she only wants two bars. I'm a rather small operation and sell to family, friends and referrals. I think that I will think about whether or not its worth it to sell coconut free or not. Thanks!

Does anyone happen to know if those who have coconut allergies also happen to have palm as well?
 

McGraysoldtowngifts

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This is a very interesting thread as My Son is highly allergic to all tree nuts and has to use an eppy Pen if he has a reaction. Most of the soaps on the market have some sort of CO in them I have become very careful when shopping for everything I read all ingredients before I buy new items.

Thanks Todd
 

PrairieLights

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Gosh, this is all good to think about. I had asked about this too. Will be sure to pass this info on to the coconut-allergy acquaintance, and to any customers!
 

earlene

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I think suggesting dedicated equipment to prevent cross contamination is carrying it too far. Thorough cleaning and dis-infecting with alcohol or 10% bleach solution should be sufficient, IMO. When I taught CPR, we cleaned the equipment via a 10 minute soak in 10% bleach solution per CDC guidelines at the time. In hospitals and clinics, etc., surgical and other equipment that is re-usable is sterilized before/after each use to prevent cross-contamination. Granted, in soaping we don't really sterilize, but if you can thoroughly clean and dis-infect your equipment, I believe that is sufficient.
 

earlene

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I think suggesting dedicated equipment to prevent cross contamination is carrying it too far. Thorough cleaning and dis-infecting with alcohol or 10% bleach solution should be sufficient, IMO. When I taught CPR, we cleaned the equipment via a 10 minute soak in 10% bleach solution per CDC guidelines at the time. In hospitals and clinics, etc., surgical and other equipment that is re-usable is sterilized before/after each use to prevent cross-contamination. Granted, in soaping we don't really sterilize, but if you can thoroughly clean and dis-infect your equipment, I believe that is sufficient.
Upon further thought, I decided to look it up and found this which indicates in allergens we should be talking about Cross Contact (and not Cross Contamination, as I did above). And it also suggests that bleach is better than alcohol to prevent Cross Contact. It comes from Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE)'s website.

FARE regarding Avoiding Cross-Contact said:
Effective Cleaning

To effectively remove food protein from surfaces, wash the surfaces with soap and water. Simply wiping the crumbs from spatulas, cookie sheets, cutting boards, or surfaces is not enough. To be safe, purchase a cutting board, plates, and kitchen utensils that will be used for allergy-free foods only. Store these items in a designated area.
Studies have shown that conventional cleaning methods are effective in removing the protein of a food allergen such as peanut. Bar and liquid soap is effective for removing protein from your hands, while alcohol-based sanitizer is not, according to a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology;. That study also showed soaps and commercial cleaning agents effectively removed peanut protein from tabletops, while dishwashing liquid alone did not.
One tablespoon of concentrated bleach per gallon of water at normal room temperature is the standard for cleaning food preparation surfaces. Hotter water temperatures decrease the effectiveness of bleach solutions. Putting the solution in a spray bottle is convenient for travelling. Allow the surface to air dry after sanitizing. The effectiveness of a bleach solution diminishes over time.
 

PrairieLights

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Send them my way, I specialize in coconut-free. ^_~
I teach soaping, etc now and again, when a decent amount of people have accumulated. She wants to learn how to make her own products, but coconut-free. I will be passing all of this info on to her to think about, and I like having the info in my brain too. You are welcome to let me know your info and I will be happy to pass it on to her as well. :)

On the cross contamination issue: I intentionally bought a dishwasher that sanitizes. I would think that would be enough (plus my hand wash first) to not worry about contamination towards coconut allergy people, but I do want to remind myself to disclose that I do use these tools while making coconut oil soap. Ya know? More info, then let them decide. ;-)
 

bathgeek

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I teach soaping, etc now and again, when a decent amount of people have accumulated. She wants to learn how to make her own products, but coconut-free. I will be passing all of this info on to her to think about, and I like having the info in my brain too. You are welcome to let me know your info and I will be happy to pass it on to her as well. :)
It was a joke, but I will message you anyway. ^_^ Thanks!
 
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