Can I sub aloe vera clear liquid for water

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

Candybee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
642
Reaction score
359
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA
I have a combination lotion/body butter recipe and was wondering if I could sub the water for aloe liquid instead? Or would that alter the texture of the lotion? Also, if its okay to use it do I still need to heat and hold to kill bacteria?

BTW I also have aloe X in powder form so I could put that in the water. But I have all this aloe vera clear liquid and it gave me some ideas....
 

lsg

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
Messages
14,568
Reaction score
5,963
I would be more in favor of adding aloe extract to your recipe. I know that some people use hydrosols in their lotions. How to Use Rose Water Essential Hydrosol in Cosmetics - Wholesale Supplies Plus
IMO, the heat and hold method helps with emulsification, stability and bacteria and mold control of a product. This does not take the place of good manufacturing processes or the need for a good preservative.
 

AliOop

Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Messages
3,946
Reaction score
6,200
Location
US
You also need to consider the other ingredients in your aloe liquid, and how those would affect your formula. Usually it contains at least ctrici acid, potassium sorbate, or something similar.
 

Candybee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
642
Reaction score
359
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA
Here are the ingredients:

Ingredients % per manufacturer: Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice 99.73, Potassium Sorbate 0.10, Sodium Benzoate 0.05, Citric Acid 0.12.

Are those % enough to have an effect?

BTW-- I have about 3 lbs of aloe vera extract/oil. I used that in a body butter recipe I made recently that was all oils and butters, no liquid. Turned out nice.

I suppose I should save the aloe vera liquid for other stuff. I use it in my soapmaking. That and aloe juice I buy at the market.
 

AliOop

Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Messages
3,946
Reaction score
6,200
Location
US
If it is just for personal use, I suppose you can try it and see if you like it in your lotion. For selling, you need to research the skin-safe usage rates of each ingredient and remember to include those on your labels.

FWIW, I make a hyaluronic acid face serum - just for myself, no selling - with an aloe vera gel that has those ingredients, plus guar gum. It works very well. I do still add a preservative.
 

Candybee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
642
Reaction score
359
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA
You remined me I still have a pail full of aloe gel. But don't plan to use that. I bought it when I was making hand sanitizer last year.
 

Quanta

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2020
Messages
249
Reaction score
323
Location
USA
You remined me I still have a pail full of aloe gel. But don't plan to use that. I bought it when I was making hand sanitizer last year.
I hope you weren't selling it. You can get into big time trouble with the FDA for that unless you have a registered drug manufacturing facility and license. It is illegal for anyone else to make and sell it because it is a drug according to the FDA.

If you are licensed and your manufacturing facility is registered, your formula/method still has to meet their strict criteria. You can only use ingredients that are approved by the FDA. You have to use very specific types of alcohol. If you did not make the alcohol yourself, or it was not made in a distillery that manufactures alcohol for human consumption, you are required to send samples of it to a lab to test for impurities before using it. It has to be pure alcohol, not liquor (some people were using tequila, which even before mixing with aloe vera gel does not have a high enough percentage of alcohol).

I'm sorry if this sounds harsh, but people have contracted serious diseases because they thought the hand sanitizer recipe they found on someone's blog was OK and would protect them. There is a reason it's illegal to manufacture drugs unless you're registered with the FDA. You have to be trained and know what you're doing.
 

earlene

Grandmother & Soaper
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2016
Messages
8,110
Reaction score
8,307
Location
Western Illinois, USA
I hope you weren't selling it. You can get into big time trouble with the FDA for that unless you have a registered drug manufacturing facility and license. It is illegal for anyone else to make and sell it because it is a drug according to the FDA.

If you are licensed and your manufacturing facility is registered, your formula/method still has to meet their strict criteria. You can only use ingredients that are approved by the FDA. You have to use very specific types of alcohol. If you did not make the alcohol yourself, or it was not made in a distillery that manufactures alcohol for human consumption, you are required to send samples of it to a lab to test for impurities before using it. It has to be pure alcohol, not liquor (some people were using tequila, which even before mixing with aloe vera gel does not have a high enough percentage of alcohol).

I'm sorry if this sounds harsh, but people have contracted serious diseases because they thought the hand sanitizer recipe they found on someone's blog was OK and would protect them. There is a reason it's illegal to manufacture drugs unless you're registered with the FDA. You have to be trained and know what you're doing.
True, however during this pandemic, the FDA's guidance & enforcement has changed: https://www.fda.gov/media/136118/download

ETA: I am not saying that is a good thing, only that it is a fact.

NB: I have never liked hand sanitizers because they tend to be very drying to my hands. But now, the ones being manufactured by businesses who are 'filling the gap' (businesses who never made HS before) are producing stuff that smells horrible. Now I hate it even more! When I use one of those (in a store, or wherever), I avoid it whenever I see it again. I carry a box of alcohol wipes in my car instead.
 
Last edited:

Candybee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
642
Reaction score
359
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA
Not to worry. I didn't make the hand sanititzer. I bought a premade base. I had originally bought the ingredients (including the aloe gel) intending to make hand sanitizer. However, I never did make it because I decided instead to buy a premade base to use. This being why I have a bucket full of aloe gel I haven't used.
 

Quanta

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2020
Messages
249
Reaction score
323
Location
USA
True, however during this pandemic, the FDA's guidance & enforcement has changed: https://www.fda.gov/media/136118/download

ETA: I am not saying that is a good thing, only that it is a fact.
Everything I mentioned in my post was according to the emergency guidelines. I had it open in another tab as I wrote my post. Sorry for not making that clear.
 

Candybee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
642
Reaction score
359
Location
Shenandoah Valley, VA

justjacqui

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2019
Messages
672
Reaction score
150
Location
Australia
I would be cautious about adding too much aloe vera liquid for two reasons. 1. Aloe Vera has high levels of electrolytes and this can interfere with some emulsifiers and 2. Aloe Vera is a very good bug food so will put a strain on your preservation system.

I would recommend just adding a small amount (5 to 10%) and ensuring that you are using a very good preservative.
 
Top