Using Peach Puree in Soap

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Anna281

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Hello!
I want to make a peach soap using peach puree and wondering if it has enough of a water content to mix as a lye base. I have done this before with watermelon and cucumber as well as various teas but those are very water heavy. Curious if anyone has tried using peaches before?
 

dibbles

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I’ve never tried to dissolve lye in something as thick as peach purée. I have used it to replace part of the water and added it to the oils.
 

IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
I'm with Dibbles and Shunt. For some of my specialty soaps I add my lye to completely filtered juices such as carrot or cucumber juice, and sometimes coffee, but for the rest of my soaps I add it to water. Adding it to something as thick as peach puree presents the problem of the lye not completely dissolving in it, which would really suck. I would instead dissolve the lye in an equal amount of water by weight, and then add the balance of liquid as the puree.


IrishLass :)
 

glendam

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I had read that the maximum food puree/additives to be added to soap without risking spoilage later was 1/8 of the oils. I would imagine using puree entirely would go over that ration, on top of the reasons already listed above, it might not be a good idea.
 

penelopejane

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I had read that the maximum food puree/additives to be added to soap without risking spoilage later was 1/8 of the oils. I would imagine using puree entirely would go over that ration, on top of the reasons already listed above, it might not be a good idea.
I’ve not heard that rule. I do the same as shunt and irish lass. Do the split method and add the purée as the extra water that the recipe requires. You can dissolve citric acid and salt in a purée quite easily.
 

glendam

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I’ve not heard that rule. I do the same as shunt and irish lass. Do the split method and add the purée as the extra water that the recipe requires. You can dissolve citric acid and salt in a purée quite easily.
It was part of a soap challenge club I participated in last year, it pertained to the semi solid additives (purees), but I am not sure what experiments the source material did to determine that. For the water we had to use a drink to replace all of the lye water.
 

dibbles

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I took part in that challenge as well. If I remember correctly, the ratio was given during a lecture at the soap guild conference.
 

mtinetti61

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I've been soaping for over 20 years, my memory is not what it used to be and I've lost soap records during 3 moves. It's been a long time since I've added food to soap and I can't remember if I need to use some sort of antioxidant or preservative...?? Like GSE, ROE or something. I have a formula for a soap with pureed avocado that I want to make.
 

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