Tips for tallow candle making?

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LaylaRose

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So, my family grows beef cows, and our processor charges basically nothing for the fat. I don't like using paraffin candles, but my dad and I are allergic to soy, and clean candles are so expensive (I mean I'm sure they have a reason to be, but it's still out of my price range) but I've heard a lot about making candles out of beef tallow, and it seems like a good option, especially since I already have a supply of fat. Every article I've read seems to say the same thing, about rendering and candle making, but is there any advice for someone who is completely new to this? I plan on playing around with some smaller batches before I do anything drastic, and I'm considering selling some whenever I get everything figured out because soy-free affordable clean candles aren't something you see a lot in my area.
Also, does anyone have any experience with CandleScience.com? ( Candle Making Supplies, Fragrance Oils, Soap Supplies, and more! ) They have a lot of clean scents/dyes, because of what I've read about using essential oils, it takes a whole lot for just one small candle, and I'm not overly fond of any essential oil smells other than lavender and mint.
 

jcandleattic

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@jcandleattic will probably be along soon to help.
Thanks!
I don't like using paraffin candles,
May I ask why? Is it because of all the misinformation about how they do not burn clean? Because that is a myth, and if a paraffin candle is made correctly it will burn just as cleanly as an "natural" wax will.
and clean candles are so expensive
As stated above almost any candle will burn clean if it is made correctly.
but I've heard a lot about making candles out of beef tallow,
as tallow is not a wax, but a fat/oil these will not burn clean, and that seems to be your main concern.
affordable clean candles
See above... Paraffin will probably be the most affordable option for a clean candle.

Hope this helps a little bit.
 
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So, my family grows beef cows, and our processor charges basically nothing for the fat. I don't like using paraffin candles, but my dad and I are allergic to soy, and clean candles are so expensive (I mean I'm sure they have a reason to be, but it's still out of my price range) but I've heard a lot about making candles out of beef tallow, and it seems like a good option, especially since I already have a supply of fat. Every article I've read seems to say the same thing, about rendering and candle making, but is there any advice for someone who is completely new to this? I plan on playing around with some smaller batches before I do anything drastic, and I'm considering selling some whenever I get everything figured out because soy-free affordable clean candles aren't something you see a lot in my area.
Also, does anyone have any experience with CandleScience.com? ( Candle Making Supplies, Fragrance Oils, Soap Supplies, and more! ) They have a lot of clean scents/dyes, because of what I've read about using essential oils, it takes a whole lot for just one small candle, and I'm not overly fond of any essential oil smells other than lavender and mint.
California Candle Supplies has lovely fragrances. He has been in the candle supply business for many years. If you happen to give them a try please mention Carolyn Z or Actz Store recommended them. As for using in cp you have to test his fragrances since some do not hold well some do. Since I no longer sell soap I do not test his fragrances in cp. Originally all his fragrances were designed for candles, I pretty much got him into supplying for the soap industry. His Caramel Tobacco is to die for and sells out quickly when he gets it in.

They are also highly knowledgeable and helpful since he is a supplier and manufacturer. He makes and sells candles himself. I am speaking of the owner John.

Please consider what jcandleattic has told you, she has made and sold candles for years and makes gorgeous candles, being knowledgeable when it comes to making candles. I love paraffin candles myself and ignore the bad information I read about them. I also love using vaseline on my old skin which my dermatologist still gives me when I have procedures done. What does social media have to say about using petroleum products?

I personally would render that lovely beef fat and use it to make some tallow/lard soaps. My best-selling and favorite soaps are made with 40% tallow and 27% lard.
 
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LaylaRose

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Thanks!

May I ask why? Is it because of all the misinformation about how they do not burn clean? Because that is a myth, and if a paraffin candle is made correctly it will burn just as cleanly as an "natural" wax will.

As stated above almost any candle will burn clean if it is made correctly.

as tallow is not a wax, but a fat/oil these will not burn clean, and that seems to be your main concern.

See above... Paraffin will probably be the most affordable option for a clean candle.

Hope this helps a little bit
Ok, so I'm not against paraffin candles in general, I was skeptical when I first saw all that stuff going around, but I looked into it and if there is some merit to it, I'm pretty sure you'd have to burn a stockpile of them 24/7 for the rest of your life to see any adverse effects. But I'm skeptical of candles from like Walmart because there seems to be only two types; expensive or suspicious. (and in this economy I can't indulge in the 'expesnive' ones as often as I'd like) If there was someone local who made paraffin candles that would be different, but the only local person I know of sells soy candles. (Which obviously wont work)
Making Paraffin candles isn't neccesarily off the table, but I already have a supply of tallow, so I wanted to expirement with that because it's basically free and would otherwise be wasted, and I've seen alot of people make candles out of it. I figure if I make it and end up disliking the way it burns I could just scrap the idea, but it seemed like the most affordable option and its atleast worth giving it a shot.
Thanks for taking the time to respond, and excusing my careless wording of my post, I realize now the way it sounds. Like cmzaha said, I use vaseline, and theres not much difference lol.
Oh, and if I were to do paraffin, do you have any suggestions on suppliers?

California Candle Supplies has lovely fragrances. He has been in the candle supply business for many years. If you happen to give them a try please mention Carolyn Z or Actz Store recommended them. As for using in cp you have to test his fragrances since some do not hold well some do. Since I no longer sell soap I do not test his fragrances in cp. Originally all his fragrances were designed for candles, I pretty much got him into supplying for the soap industry. His Caramel Tobacco is to die for and sells out quickly when he gets it in.

They are also highly knowledgeable and helpful since he is a supplier and manufacturer. He makes and sells candles himself. I am speaking of the owner John.

Please consider what jcandleattic has told you, she has made and sold candles for years and makes gorgeous candles, being knowledgeable when it comes to making candles. I love paraffin candles myself and ignore the bad information I read about them. I also love using vaseline on my old skin which my dermatologist still gives me when I have procedures done. What does social media have to say about using petroleum products?

I personally would render that lovely beef fat and use it to make some tallow/lard soaps. My best-selling and favorite soaps are made with 40% tallow and 27% lard.
You can see my response to jcandleattic about my thoughts on paraffin, I don't feel like typing it twice, but I do feel I kinda misrepresented my feelings on paraffin as a whole. I will check out California Candle supplies for sure, but if I may ask (excuse my ignorance, I'm new to the field) what does cp stand for?
Also, what does the lard add to the soap? I've also been looking into making tallow soaps, but I haven't seen anyone suggest adding lard.
 
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jcandleattic

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Oh, and if I were to do paraffin, do you have any suggestions on suppliers?
Candle Science sells paraffin blends. However, I like Candles and Supplies blend that is called "125mp paraffin wax" - they also sell paraffin candle kits.
what does cp stand for?
Cold processed - it's a soapmaking term. :)
 
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You can see my response to jcandleattic about my thoughts on paraffin, I don't feel like typing it twice, but I do feel I kinda misrepresented my feelings on paraffin as a whole. I will check out California Candle supplies for sure, but if I may ask (excuse my ignorance, I'm new to the field) what does cp stand for?
Also, what does the lard add to the soap? I've also been looking into making tallow soaps, but I haven't seen anyone suggest adding lard.
Lard adds a nice creaminess and also slows trace nicely in cold process soaps. I love 100% and actually high percentage lard soaps but have DOS issues ie dreaded orange soaps due to rancidity which most in the forum do not when using lard so I keep my lard at lower percentages and use higher tallow. Tallow soaps do not lather well but mixed with the percentage I use and adding in 5% castor then using the remainder percentage of whatever liquid oils you like it makes a really great soap. I just figured if you have great access to tallow why not take advantage of it if you do not mind rendering it out?
 

HoppyCosmetics

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I've heard a lot about making candles out of beef tallow, and it seems like a good option
I don't know much about candles, but ive been looking into making beeswax candles, because it has a lot of benefits, but to make them or wax melts, you need to add coconut oil to the wax, so couldn't you swap the coconut oil for tallow? Just an idea, not sure if it would work, but its maybe worth looking into.
 
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LaylaRose

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I don't know much about candles, but ive been looking into making beeswax candles, because it has a lot of benefits, but to make them or wax melts, you need to add coconut oil to the wax, so couldn't you swap the coconut oil for tallow? Just an idea, not sure if it would work, but its maybe worth looking into.
Actually, I have heard a few people say to do just that. From what I understand the main issue with beeswax is how hard it is after it's rendered, and an issue with tallow is how soft it is, so it's not uncommon to use a blend of both to make a better candle. I have a decent bit of beeswax left over from when we raised bees, so I am planning on experimenting with the proportions of beeswax and tallow to see what works best.
 

Marsi

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Another (old fashioned) method of making tallow candles was to coat them in a stronger wax (like beeswax) to hold them firm in warmer conditions (and during the burn).

A blend would work really well!

I'd love to hear what you think of the smell (apparently tallow candles need snuffing to stop the smell)
(Thank you for this query - I got to learn about rushlight candles 🥰 )
 

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