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penelopejane

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All of my soaps made with camellia oil (only at 10%) are really soft after I use them for a few days. The recipes vary so I know it's the camellia oil. I have about 34 bars which have been cured between 2 and 3 months. Some have 30% olive oil. Will those soaps continue to harden enough, over time, to be able to use?

Question is, if I use this soap for confetti in a harder soap recipe won't it just be soft bits in a harder soap or will it not be as noticeable once it's confetti-ed?
 
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cmzaha

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I find this interesting and would have to wonder about your liquid percentage, and your other oils. I use camellia at 15% in one of my facial bars and it has never led to a soft soap. Give them a 6 month cure or so and they should improve
 

penelopejane

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I find this interesting and would have to wonder about your liquid percentage, and your other oils. I use camellia at 15% in one of my facial bars and it has never led to a soft soap. Give them a 6 month cure or so and they should improve
60% Rice Bran, 10% Shea, 10% Camellia, 10% OO, 10% Castor

40% OO, 30% Camellia, 10% Rice Bran, 10% Shea, 10% Castor

40% RB, 30% OO, 10% Shea, 10% Almond, 10% Castor (No camellia but still mushy!)
 

kchaystack

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With only 10% shea as a hard oil, its going to stay soft for a while, and might not ever get as hard as a bar with palm/lard/tallow. They will also likely need a very long cure. My palm free vegie recipe needs 4 to 5 months.
 

IrishLass

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Ditto what Kchaystack said.

Taking a peek at the fatty acid profile (which I find to be a more helpful tool when it comes to formulating- as opposed to the other 'qualities' numbers), this is how things look to me.......

Formula 1, a very soluble soap that will melt away fairly quickly compared to other more insoluble formulas with a higher stearic/palmitic content, and has an increased vulnerability to DOS because of the combined 23% linoleic and 1% linolenic combo. Will benefit greatly from a very long cure....the longer, the better.... but will never be as hard as a soap with a higher stearic/palmitic content.

Formula 2: Also very soluble/will melt away fairly quickly in comparison to other more insoluble formulas. But with only a combo of 12% linoleic and 1% linolenic, it should cure out harder and be less DOS-prone than formula #1, but will still need a long cure.

Formula #3: Also very soluble/will melt away faster/vulnerable to DOS because of the 20% linoleic and 1% linolenic combo. The longer the cure, the better.

If it were me, I would definitely try to reformulate so as to bring your total % of linoleic/linolenic acid combo down to no more than 15% (to decrease softness and to also lessen the chance of DOS), and then try to bring the total combined stearic/palmitic % to about 25% at the very least (to increase hardness and longevity).

Anyway, that's what I would do.


IrishLass :)
 

penelopejane

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Ditto what Kchaystack said.

Taking a peek at the fatty acid profile (which I find to be a more helpful tool when it comes to formulating- as opposed to the other 'qualities' numbers), this is how things look to me.......

If it were me, I would definitely try to reformulate so as to bring your total % of linoleic/linolenic acid combo down to no more than 15% (to decrease softness and to also lessen the chance of DOS), and then try to bring the total combined stearic/palmitic % to about 25% at the very least (to increase hardness and longevity).

Anyway, that's what I would do.

IrishLass :)
Thanks Irish lass and Kchaystack, These are old soaps (3 months old!) that I made before I perfected my recipes. If I confetti them and mix into a new soap mix will they be hard or will they make the new soap mushy? Or should I just let them cure longer and use as they are?
 
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