So... what's a bath bombs shelf life?

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PuddinAndPeanuts

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I assume since they're dry, my worries re: age are: cracking, crumbling, warting (whatever that is! :), and scent fading?

Will corn starch help fix/lock in scent or should I consider adding some tapioca or kaolin toward that end?

I'm hoping silica gel is available on eBay- was planning on storing in sealed tubs with what my family call the "do not eat packs" (silica gel packets). If I can't get it, I can at least make a lot of rice packets out of pantyhose which isn't too shabby about pulling moisture out of the air.

My body butter lasts more than a year- will these suckers hold up as well? I would suspect not, right? Somehow I feel like the fragrance won't hold as well due to oxidation... (kind of thinking 'out loud' there)

Anyway, my gut was saying I can go ahead and stock up for the Spring season, but don't go crazy and start making Santa Hats for quite a few months.

Thanks so much- I always really appreciate the amazing feedback I get from you all!
 

shunt2011

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I have some that are a year old. I set them aside when I made them. I opened one last week and it still smelled fine and still fizzed. I think as long as they are sealed you should be okay. I'm by no means a pro a these things though.
 

lsg

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Unless you have added an oil that can become rancid, bath bombs should last for quite a while, especially if they are in sealed packaging. I found a couple that are several years old; they still look good. I will get one out and put it in water just to test its fizzing power.
 

LilyJo

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I have a love hate relationship with bath bombs and their sheer unpredicatability! What works today is a disaster tomorrow!

Finally thought I had cracked it and made a few to see how well they dried out. After 24 hours they were rock hard and I was really pleased, didnt wrap them but had a few in different location around the house and studio to try and replicate what customers are prone to do; within a week they had all gone really squidgy and were no good whatsoever.

Next test is to do the same thing but wrapping them in shrink wrap and see how they fare - having tried so many variations of recipes and additives I have to come to the conclusion that the environment in which they are made (including weather conditions) affects the final bomb.

I suspect that unless they are sealed they may be prone to going soft unless you live in a very dry area...which is not the UK at all!
 

earlene

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I'm hoping silica gel is available on eBay- was planning on storing in sealed tubs with what my family call the "do not eat packs" (silica gel packets). If I can't get it, I can at least make a lot of rice packets out of pantyhose which isn't too shabby about pulling moisture out of the air.
I know they are available on Amazon, so the may be available on eBay as well.
 

NOLAGal

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Unless you have added an oil that can become rancid, bath bombs should last for quite a while, especially if they are in sealed packaging. I found a couple that are several years old; they still look good. I will get one out and put it in water just to test its fizzing power.

Anyone happen to have a list of EO that may become rancid knowing which oils to avoid could be very helpful long-term thanks!
 

NOLAGal

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I have a love hate relationship with bath bombs and their sheer unpredicatability! What works today is a disaster tomorrow!

Finally thought I had cracked it and made a few to see how well they dried out. After 24 hours they were rock hard and I was really pleased, didnt wrap them but had a few in different location around the house and studio to try and replicate what customers are prone to do; within a week they had all gone really squidgy and were no good whatsoever.

Next test is to do the same thing but wrapping them in shrink wrap and see how they fare - having tried so many variations of recipes and additives I have to come to the conclusion that the environment in which they are made (including weather conditions) affects the final bomb.

I suspect that unless they are sealed they may be prone to going soft unless you live in a very dry area...which is not the UK at all!
I live in an area that usually is very high in humidity. I never thought much about how much humidity was in my house until I started making bath bombs . I bought a humidity reader so I can see how much humidity I actually have so far over the last couple weeks it's been averaging around 50% but shot up over 60 when it was raining outside. I'm sure when summer comes it's going to go up higher . I plan on buying a dehumidifier in the hopes that I can try to keep the environment consistent and controlled year round.

I've seen lots of people say that their formula was working great and then they tried later and it wouldn't work. It seems to me there is only a couple factors that could have caused this to happen; weather (humidity), different ingredients or brand of ingredients, slightly different ratios, or just human error. If you use the same ingredients, weight everything precisely the same each time, same exact method and formula, and the climate (humidity) is the same it seems one would hope at least that it would continue to work everytime.
 

Luviesmom

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Just because I an am worry wart, a bit OCD. I would prefer a use by date on bombs within a 6 month time frame. No scientific data just cause I believe it maybe stale. :)
 

maya

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They will alst as long as the shortest shelf life ingredient, in mine that would be the oil I use. For you it might be something else. love.
 

Susie

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I just came from two farmer's markets, both of whom had bath bombs. All bath bombs, save one, were soft. The one that was hard was made yesterday. They were all shrink wrapped. The maker of the hard one said that there is no keeping them firm in this humidity unless you make them the day before.

Lesson learned without me having wasted material...win!
 

NOLAGal

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I just came from two farmer's markets, both of whom had bath bombs. All bath bombs, save one, were soft. The one that was hard was made yesterday. They were all shrink wrapped. The maker of the hard one said that there is no keeping them firm in this humidity unless you make them the day before.

Lesson learned without me having wasted material...win!
Is the farmers market outside, if so maybe that is why? We have a Lush store here (New Orleans) and plenty humidity but theirs are rock hard and I'm sure some are months old. Also bought some in a nearby mall from a local business who makes them and sells them here and theirs were real hard too.

The ones I make at home I experience the complete opposite, it seems the humidity causes them to take forever to initially dry (like a week no way one day) but after a week or two they will get rock hard.
 
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Susie

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Yep, they are outside. And that could very well be why.

One thing that worried me about trying to go into that market is that almost every booth had bath bombs. Even the booth selling cacti! That seems to be a real strong fad around here.
 

Catastrophe

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I live in an area that usually is very high in humidity. I never thought much about how much humidity was in my house until I started making bath bombs . I bought a humidity reader so I can see how much humidity I actually have so far over the last couple weeks it's been averaging around 50% but shot up over 60 when it was raining outside. I'm sure when summer comes it's going to go up higher . I plan on buying a dehumidifier in the hopes that I can try to keep the environment consistent and controlled year round.

I've seen lots of people say that their formula was working great and then they tried later and it wouldn't work. It seems to me there is only a couple factors that could have caused this to happen; weather (humidity), different ingredients or brand of ingredients, slightly different ratios, or just human error. If you use the same ingredients, weight everything precisely the same each time, same exact method and formula, and the climate (humidity) is the same it seems one would hope at least that it would continue to work everytime.
My grandmother lives in much the same humidity as you, she lives in Florida on the Gulf of Mexico. She absolutely monitors her humidity when she wants to make peanut brittle or divinity. Peanut brittle does ok-ish in high humidity, but divinity doesn't. I imagine bath bombs would be very similar to making candy in that respect.
 

NOLAGal

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Yep, they are outside. And that could very well be why.

One thing that worried me about trying to go into that market is that almost every booth had bath bombs. Even the booth selling cacti! That seems to be a real strong fad around here.
Outside right now here, it's 76% Humidity (72 degrees) and inside its 52% (74 degrees) and its a pretty nice, dry sunny day. I'm going to purchase a dehumidifier, I know as we go through spring and into summer it's going to be real hard to keep the humidity in the house down when its like 90% ++ outside. I've never monitored the humidity in the house before but noticed a couple days ago when it was raining outside it went up to 61% inside. From everything I read by other people, a controlled, consistent environment year round seems very important.

One thing that worried me about trying to go into that market is that almost every booth had bath bombs. Even the booth selling cacti! That seems to be a real strong fad around here.
Like anything else, to be successful even in a crowded field, you have to offer better quality, lower price and advertise, advertise, advertise ! quality product at a good price will get you a lot of repeat customers and good marketing, branding (advertising) will allow them to find you and try your product, so you can make them a regular customer.
 

NOLAGal

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Speaking of lush, I was passing on of their stores today so I bought the intergalactic bath bomb and used it tonight. I would say this one was waaaay past it's shelf live. It had ZERO fizz and just a very slow oze of color foam. It was hard before putting in my bath but once it was in I picked it up and it was creamy feeling...
 
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