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pvc pipe question

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ladyj

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Hi again,
Just posted in the intro forum with my first question but I see here this is where the action is. It's 3:47 am in Portugal. :shock: Guess what I'm thinking about? How to get the cp soap out of the pvc pipe I'm using as a mold.
In the last few minutes I've learned about Vaseline (didn't work for me last time, but I didn't goop it on) and my freezer is way to small (and full) and I need to keep the molds upright.
If I line the tube with plastic I'll never get the smooth finish I'm working on.
Any help or suggestions would be helpfull.
I've been pretty isolated in this interest of mine. Actually I'm starting to sell it on consignment in 3 stores next week. No soaping community in this country!! Imagine!
It's time for me to talk the talk with other soapers so please lets talk
 

Becky

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Hi LadyJ, welcome to the forum.

I use laminating plastic to line my PVC pipes. That way, it slides straight out, then I just unroll it from plastic. Works a treat for me.
 

ladyj

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Laminating plastic? Please describe though I have the feeling I'm going to have to come up with a more accessable alternative. Clear plastic garbage bags? But then I lose the smooth finished edges.
Help!
 

justme

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I used the freezer paper shiny side toward the s-oap and a silicone baking bad. Slipped right out Was very pleased.
 

Solo

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To PVC or not to PVC... THAT is the question

Hi Ladyj

I'm very new to the craft myself but I would like to share my experience this weekend. I was in London, Christmas shopping with my wife. She persuaded me to go into a store called LUSH which can be found in most major UK towns now. I have always resisted in the past because they smell so awful with a very strong perfume smell eminating from the store.


The store was well laid out with a country feel, chalk boards for information about the products and huge loaves of soap everywhere. LUSH don't cut their soap until someone buys it. They may have a couple of cut pieces wrapped with a price on (they price per kilo) but mostly it is just piles and piles of soap. Two main molds I think, a large deep fluted flan dish, about 60cm across and the other is a washing up bowl... you can see the lines and indents on the bottom of the loaves! They cut the soap with a kitchen knife, no special rigs and no cheese wires.

It was my intention to make my soap as smooth and store like as possible before seeing all this. I wanted clean straight sides and almost a polished finish. What LUSH sell are odd shaped and rather crude bars with occasional evidence of rebatching and marks from the molds. All I can tell you is that people love it! My wife doesn't like them because they list "perfume" and a few e numbers on their ingredients but there was a line at the till and I know they have dozens of shops!

50% of the floor space in the store was used for bath bombs or fizzies if you prefer. I suppose one must conclude that these are a good money maker for them as they are about the same size as a bar of soap but are single use!

My point here is that LUSH have found people actually like the strange shapes and wrinkles. People see the fresh cut as a distinct advantage because it is "fresh" and because they know they are buying from the source.

As a result of my visit I am going to be using more unusual molds and I am going to price by the pound (still giving it away at the moment because I'm still learning... batch 6 tonight). The fresh cut thing is a different look I suppose but if you try to make the soap smooth and compete in the mass produced market your product will always seem expensive because people will compare.

I doubt my post here will work the same as a visit to LUSH or their website at http://www.lush.co.uk but give it some thought. You might also email some proffessional soap shops in the UK and US to ask their opinion. As they are already in the business they might have some good advice.

One last thing. I read an article somewhere from a lady who had made an insert to a PVC pipe like a ram. It was a jar I think. She put this on her table and the pipe on top and then pushed down on the pipe to get the soap moving. Once the initial adhesion had been broken she just reached in and kept the loaf moving by hand. That might work.

Good Luck.

Derek
 

mirandazoo

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You know, that would be a great way to present soaps at market and craft shows. Have some already packaged up and then logs ready to cut and charged by the ounce.

You've already got me thinking! Will check out the website. Sounds like a great place to visit. Someday, I'll make it to London...
 

Becky

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LadyJ, laminating plastic is the film that is 'glued' to a poster or a certificate when it is put thru a laminating machine.
 

Becky

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I get offcuts from work - we have a BIG laminating machine there. You could try asking wherever they laminate posters, if you have someone who does that nearby. They may be happy for you to take it away for them.
 

paupau

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I second the freezer paper. I works like a charm.
 

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