Newbie wants to make soap w/o olive oil or palm...

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by peonyplanter@comcast.net, Sep 7, 2010.

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  1. Sep 7, 2010 #1

    peonyplanter@comcast.net

    peonyplanter@comcast.net

    peonyplanter@comcast.net

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    Hi there! I am wondering if it is possible to make a soap that is primarily made from shea, jojoba, sunflower, or safflower oil.

    Thanks in advance for any replies! :)
    Jean
     
  2. Sep 7, 2010 #2

    soapbuddy

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    Sounds like it would make a soft soap. You could sub Rice Bran oil for the olive. I don't use palm at all.
     
  3. Sep 7, 2010 #3

    Lindy

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    I'm another one that doesn't use Palm. Now depending on your views - tallow is wonderful in soap! If you prefer not to then you can try a bit of Beeswax to harden your bar. Don't use too much as it is a lather killer.
     
  4. Sep 7, 2010 #4

    honor435

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    why no olive? You need a hard oil like coc or crisco or lard. make sure to add castor at about 10%, it makes it bubble better. Do you use soap calc? you can put in the oils you want and see what kind of bar you will get.
     
  5. Sep 7, 2010 #5

    peonyplanter@comcast.net

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    My son is consuming a low salicylate diet. It also suggests that what is put on the skin also adds to the overall amt of salicylates in the body. Olive oil and coconut oil are very high on the chart, and palm is not listed (therefore I would rather not use it). We are still following this diet, as it is the only way we were able to get off his reflux meds (and stay off them for a year). If he eats away from this diet, he gets gi symptoms and a rashy bottom.

    He has had rashy, red skin that is like sandpaper on his cheeks and arms since 9 mo (the beginning of eating more solids and the start of using burt's bees and sunscreen). It has been diagnosed keratosis pilarus. Actually, I have wondered about enviromental allergens, foods, and topical products as the culprits. It never goes away, nor can we pin down anything that makes it better for the long term.

    We are currently using Dr. Bronners (which has been better), but using no soap and rinsing his skin every day gives us the best result. I have used emu oil on it as well (in additon to a lot of creams that the dermatologist suggested, but those certainly did not help). I just wonder if it is the oils in the soap, as some are high and low in salicylates. I know it must sound crazy, as the diet is not well known. Our gastroenterologist is aware of this diet, and said to keep with it, if it is working.

    Here is a link to the chart of fats/oils and their salicylate content.
    http://salicylatesensitivity.com/about/ ... fats-oils/

    I was thinking that even soap made with lye as the only listed ingredient (like Grandma's soap) typically has olive and palm oils. Is that right? Sorry for such a long winded answer, and much thanks for the posts from everyone!
     
  6. Sep 7, 2010 #6

    krissy

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    why not try plain lard or tallow? if what your link says is true then neither of those should cause a problem. i understand food issues so i hope your son feels better and you get everything under control. :D
     
  7. Sep 7, 2010 #7

    Bukawww

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    I wonder if the salicylates survive the saponification reaction? Coconut oil is very moisturizing in its raw form but drying in its soaped form...I don't really know what salicylates are though so don't mind me lol.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2010 #8

    honor435

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    I wouldnt think the wash away product would make his food allergies worse? IM no doctor though! I know my friend that has bad skin(dry) and has probelems with storebought soap, says mine doesnt bother her at all. Could you add some castor for more bubbles?
     
  9. Sep 9, 2010 #9

    carebear

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    As the parent of kids with peanut allergies I've done tons of research on this stuff and absolutely allergic people must avoid the ingredients in skin care products as well. The saving thing is that most refined oils have all the proteins (allergens) removed, but even so = not.worth.the.risk

    I'm on the fence about the salicylate sensitivity with regard to foods - but admit total ignorance on it.
     
  10. Sep 9, 2010 #10

    Sunny

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    I just wanted to ask, have you tried Cetaphil cleanser? Dr. Bronner's does have olive oil and palm oil in it.
     
  11. Sep 9, 2010 #11

    peonyplanter@comcast.net

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    I know that I have heard that cetaphil is really recommended for problem skin; it is in fact why I used it for years hoping it would solve my acne. Our recent change to regular soap has actually improved my skin, as it isn't red and irritated after I wash it. And the cysts have pretty much gone away. Ironically, the places that still flare up on my skin are around my hairline, so I am wondering about the Bronners and the suave clarifying shampoo that I use on my hair.

    I was reluctant to use cetaphil on his skin for that reason. He did try the Cleure line, which is salicylate free. But it is not necessarily soap based. No significant improvement.

    After reading some research on exzema causation, I tried going soap only, as some research actually indicated some cases of ezema actually may be caused by detergents. Without seeing a vast improvement, I thought about avoiding those oils topically based on the diet. I keep trying things hoping we will hit on something that works. But the causation could be something completely unrelated. I don't know.

    I think I will look at lard recipes. Which is easier tallow or lard? Any recipes that anyone really recommends for this particular situation? If it doesn't work, then I think we will give some other soaps a try that were mentioned here. I can't thank you all enough for the information you have shared and possible ideas for moving forward.
     
  12. Sep 9, 2010 #12

    soapbuddy

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    Take a look at some of the recipes on Miller Soap. Any of them can be used with tallow or lard. http://www.millersoap.com/#Soap Contents
     
  13. Sep 9, 2010 #13

    Muzhik

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    I'd try lard, simply because I can buy it in the same shelf with butter at my local food store. Tallow is much harder to find -- most people here have to rend the tallow themselves.
     

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