How to make soap that will evaporate with no smell?

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

easystuff

New Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2016
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hello,

I am a novice looking to create a soap recipe that can be put into a spray bottle (non-pressurized). Basically, I want a 409 with out the smell. This is not a do it yourself project, I am going to be working with a chemical mixing facility that can make me a few gallons at a time. So I want there to be as little technique involved as possible (no intricate temperature changes, things like that). I just want a simple soap that I can put in a spray bottle and disinfect a table or something that had food on it without leaving a smell. All I want is for it to evaporate and be clean.

Here are my parameters:

Must be simple to mix
leaves behind no residue (won't clog spray bottle)
antibacterial
quick drying (like 409 type cleaner)
ZERO smell is the kicker, or as little residual smell as possible
something you could clean a surface and then immediately eat off it

I have been told that a good mixture would be oleic acid and ethanol.

Can you please advise with something that I can use as a platform to start with?
 

shunt2011

Moderator Emeritus
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
15,448
Reaction score
9,735
Location
Michigan
Hello,

I am a novice looking to create a soap recipe that can be put into a spray bottle (non-pressurized). Basically, I want a 409 with out the smell. This is not a do it yourself project, I am going to be working with a chemical mixing facility that can make me a few gallons at a time. So I want there to be as little technique involved as possible (no intricate temperature changes, things like that). I just want a simple soap that I can put in a spray bottle and disinfect a table or something that had food on it without leaving a smell. All I want is for it to evaporate and be clean.

Here are my parameters:

Must be simple to mix
leaves behind no residue (won't clog spray bottle)
antibacterial
quick drying (like 409 type cleaner)
ZERO smell is the kicker, or as little residual smell as possible
something you could clean a surface and then immediately eat off it

I have been told that a good mixture would be oleic acid and ethanol.

Can you please advise with something that I can use as a platform to start with?
You may want to at least go to the introduction forum and introduce yourself rather than just come on asking for recipes. recipes.

Also, you may want to do some research here on the forum. We make soap. It's it's going to need to be rinsed off as that's the nature of soap.
 

Obsidian

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
10,328
Reaction score
8,159
Location
Idaho, USA
Also, soap doesn't disinfect, it just washes dirt/germs/bacteria away. Sounds like you really need some kind of chemical.
 

galaxyMLP

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2015
Messages
1,838
Reaction score
1,333
Location
Florida
What about straight denatured alcohol and water? It has a smell but it evaporates very fast and leaves no residue. It also smells less strong than isopropyl alcohol but it disinfects unlike soaps.

Like Obsidian said, soap will not disinfect, only clean away dirt/grime. If you wanted some kind of "soapy" action you would need to look as synthetic detergents that wipe away cleanly. Almost all cleaners are going to have a smell. Even "unscented" products have a smell they just don't have additional fragrance added.

There are a few gentle surfactants that have no smell however I don't know if they wipe cleanly. This is probably going to be something that needs trial and error to find a low odor, effective combination. You need to examine the kinds of surfaces you're cleaning and what you're cleaning off of them in order to get an effective one.
 

cmzaha

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
11,922
Reaction score
11,504
Location
Southern California
Since you mentioned working with a chem facility for production I have to wonder if you are trying to make a odor free disinfectant product for selling. If that is the case you need to do much more research and not ask in here for formulas. There would be a lot of red tape to go through for producing and selling such. We do not make disinfectants just soap whether it be liquid, solid, or cream soap. What you really seem to want is going to take a chemist to design.

Recently Shark Tank aired an episode of a product a couple of fellas made for cleaning. They showed you could drink it. Sorry I do not remember the name of the product
 
Last edited:

TeresaT

I see you.
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
2,269
Reaction score
2,456
Location
Chatta-Vegas, TN
Bwahaha!! Hi, easystuff. Welcome to the forum. Sounds like you're looking for a walk down Easy Street. This post made me laugh out loud. I have nothing helpful or constructive to add. I just wanted to say hi and thanks for the laugh.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,378
Location
USA
If you want a no-rinse no-added-fragrance 409-clone disinfectant, I'd think you'd want to start with 409's ingredients list and go from there --

Ingredients:
Water
Lauramine Oxide (surfactant)
Alkyl C12-16 Dimethylbenzyl Ammonium Chloride (biocide, surfactant, 0.3%)
Dimethicone/Silica/PEG Distearate Antifoam
Ethanolamine
Fragrance
Liquitint® Bright Yellow Dye
Liquitint® Blue HP Dye
Tetrapotassium EDTA

https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/pr...mula409antibacterialallpurposekitchencleaner/

Not a drop of lye-based soap in that list. Soap doesn't disinfect. It needs to be rinsed off.
 

Kamahido

Paladin of Soap
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
623
Location
Wyoming, MI
Sounds like you have or know someone who has some kind of restaurant as you want gallons of a fore mentioned cleaner. Making your own cleaner for a restaurant would potentially open you up to a LOT of personal liability. And correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't FDA regulations state that 99.9% of all bacteria must be killed 30 seconds from initial cleaning? I doubt the health inspector will be pleased to see handmade detergent used to clean the tables.
 

dixiedragon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2013
Messages
6,472
Reaction score
4,905
Location
Birmingham, Alabama, USA
I read a very interesting book one time "How Do I Clean the Moosehead?" The author owns a janitorial service and cleans everything - including moose heads. One thing he mentioned is that even products that claim they don't need to be rinsed away ... still need to be rinsed away. He described the situation of cleaning a grocery store. The store was mopped every night, yet still looked grimy by noon the next day. What happened was the cleaning product residue was causing dirt and dust to stick to the floor. Even though the product claimed it didn't need to be rinsed. Once he started mopping with water after mopping with the product, the floor stayed cleaner looking for much longer.
 

Arimara

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2015
Messages
3,434
Reaction score
2,545
Sounds like you have or know someone who has some kind of restaurant as you want gallons of a fore mentioned cleaner. Making your own cleaner for a restaurant would potentially open you up to a LOT of personal liability. And correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't FDA regulations state that 99.9% of all bacteria must be killed 30 seconds from initial cleaning? I doubt the health inspector will be pleased to see handmade detergent used to clean the tables.
At the very least, I would think that restaurants using homemade detergents to clean and/or sanitize would be in for a well deserved visit from health inspectors, if they aren't outright closed on the spot and hit with citations to say the least.
 
Top