First liquid soap has turned into a rock

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Good morning! I tried to make a liquid soap paste today with 100% olive oil. I'm embarrassed to admit I didn't put it through a lye calculator myself and just used someone else's recipe. Whoops.

32 oz olive oil
11.6 oz water
6.5 oz KOH
8 oz glycerin

I blended it all up in the pot, closed it for a long slow cook, opened it for a stir after 15 minutes, and my "soap paste" is solid. Have I broken it? Will it soften or it is done for? And what should I do differently next time?
 
Live posting a soaping disaster:

I'm operating under the theory that the cooker was too hot, and/or there wasn't enough water in. I've turned the cooker off and poured in some hot water, hoping it will dissolve some of the rock soap into itself and eventually make the batch pliable again.
 
Broken up, mixed with hot water, off the heat. Fingers crossed.

disaster castile in process.jpeg
 
I haven't checked your numbers, but from what you described, you did nothing wrong. Liquid soap paste often becomes quite hard when it is done cooking. Next step is dilution, and you've already started that correctly: break or cut it into pieces, add hot water, and keep it over low heat as it dilutes. Definitely keep track of your starting paste weight, and how much water you add as you go.
 
I haven't checked your numbers, but from what you described, you did nothing wrong. Liquid soap paste often becomes quite hard when it is done cooking. Next step is dilution, and you've already started that correctly: break or cut it into pieces, add hot water, and keep it over low heat as it dilutes. Definitely keep track of your starting paste weight, and how much water you add as you go.
No way! It was supposed to cook for 2-3 hours and it only cooked for 15 minutes. That's wild. But it does look translucent.

I'm not sure I trust that it's all the way done - might see if it gets clearer in solution as I keep it warm and add water. Thank you.
 
LS is just like bar soap in that it will saponify on its own (cold process) even if you don't cook it (hot process).

For that reason, I rarely cook my LS at all any more. I just blend to the taffy stage, cover it, and leave it alone. It is generally zap-free within a few hours after that. It's "done" when it is zap-free - cooking longer than that is just a waste of time.
 
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When using glycerin the cooking time for the paste is much quicker.
Oh! Thank you!
LS is just like bar soap in that it will saponify on its own (cold process) even if you don't cook it (hot process).

For that reason, I rarely cook my LS at all any more. I just blend to the taffy stage, cover it, and leave it alone. It is generally zap-free within a few hours after that. It's "done" when it is zap-free - cooking longer than that is just a waste of time.
& thank you also! Don't know what I would do without y'all. Ali, how does one test for zaps with liquid soap? I'll look around in here too but figure you might answer faster than I can find it.
 
Ali, how does one test for zaps with liquid soap? I'll look around in here too but figure you might answer faster than I can find it.
Sorry, I missed this question. A little tip: if you put an @ before my username, it will tag me so that I am more likely to see it. ;)

The zap test is the same with liquid soap paste as it is with bar soap. Wet a bit of it so you can work up a little lather, and then touch that to the tip of your tongue. A "zap" will be an immediate electric shock, like touching something with static electricity. It will not be a delayed reaction, or a bitter taste, both of which are normal for all soap. HTH!
 
Looks like normal liquid soap paste to me. The firmness will vary depending on the water content and fatty acids present.

Yep, liquid soap can be done in 15-30 minutes if you use some glycerin as an accelerant. Even if you use only water and substitute moderate heat in place of the glycerin, it can still be fully saponified in an hour or so.

At least that's been my experience. I'm always amazed at the people who cook their soap paste for hours, even days.
 
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