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Exfoliating Question

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Chalk Creek

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Do you think labeling a soap as "Exfoliating" is going into the realm of cosmetic labeling? If so, what are other good terms? I use "scrub" for my gardeners hand soap, so would prefer not to use that term for a bath soap.
 
G

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Good Question.........

Considering the word exfoliating means according to dictionary.com
1. to throw off in scales, splinters, etc.
2. to remove the surface of (a bone, the skin, etc.) in scales or laminae.
–verb (used without object)
3. to throw off scales or flakes; peel off in thin fragments: The bark of some trees exfoliates.
4. Geology. a. to split or swell into a scaly aggregate, as certain minerals when heated.
b. to separate into rudely concentric layers or sheets, as certain rocks during weathering.
5. Medicine/Medical. to separate and come off in scales, as scaling skin or any structure separating in flakes.


Your not making any medical claims that it will remove wrinkles, cure acne or whatnot, it should be ok......
 

Neil

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Faithy wrote
1. to throw off in scales, splinters, etc.
2. to remove the surface of (a bone, the skin, etc.) in scales or laminae.
–verb (used without object)
3. to throw off scales or flakes; peel off in thin fragments: The bark of some trees exfoliates.
4. Geology. a. to split or swell into a scaly aggregate, as certain minerals when heated.
b. to separate into rudely concentric layers or sheets, as certain rocks during weathering.
5. Medicine/Medical. to separate and come off in scales, as scaling skin or any structure separating in flakes.

Lets see, Label: This soap will remove scales of flaky skin or bone it will swell and split them into a scaly aggregate those scales will turn to Minerals if heated. It could be good for scabies, shingles or just plain poor personal hygiene.
LOL Im just joking of coarse

Revitalizing, I believe most every understands Exfoliating though.
 

Tabitha

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Some claims are cosmetic in nature while others are drug in nature. I believe exfoliate is cosmetic in nature. Here are some quotes from the FDA website. Below it states a moisturiser is a cosmetic which *must* mean the term moisturise is a cosmetic term & not a medical term so it is a safe label word too, which has been the topic of much debate in the soaping community:

"Examples of products that are both cosmetics and drugs are shampoos that treat dandruff, fluoride toothpastes to prevent dental decay, and sunscreens and sunblocking cosmetics, including foundations that contain sunscreens. (See "Dodging the Rays" in the July-August 1993 FDA Consumer.)"

...and more...

"Is It a Cosmetic, a Drug, or Both? (or Is It Soap?)
The legal difference between a cosmetic and a drug is determined by a product's intended use. Different laws and regulations apply to each type of product. Firms sometimes violate the law by marketing a cosmetic with a drug claim, or by marketing a drug as if it were a cosmetic, without adhering to requirements for drugs.

How does the law define a cosmetic?
The Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) defines cosmetics by their intended use, as "articles intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body...for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance" [FD&C Act, sec. 201(i)]. Among the products included in this definition are skin moisturizers, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, shampoos, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product.

How does the law define a drug?
The FD&C Act defines drugs by their intended use, as "(A) articles intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease..and (B) articles (other than food) intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals" [FD&C Act, sec. 201(g)(1)].

How can a product be both a cosmetic and a drug?
Some products meet the definitions of both cosmetics and drugs. This may happen when a product has two intended uses. For example, a shampoo is a cosmetic because its intended use is to cleanse the hair. An antidandruff treatment is a drug because its intended use is to treat dandruff. Consequently, an antidandruff shampoo is both a cosmetic and a drug. Among other cosmetic/drug combinations are toothpastes that contain fluoride, deodorants that are also antiperspirants, and moisturizers and makeup marketed with sun-protection claims. Such products must comply with the requirements for both cosmetics and drugs.

What about "cosmeceuticals"?
The FD&C Act does not recognize any such category as "cosmeceuticals." A product can be a drug, a cosmetic, or a combination of both, but the term "cosmeceutical" has no meaning under the law.

How is a product's intended use established?
Intended use may be established in a number of ways. Among them are:

Claims stated on the product labeling, in advertising, on the Internet, or in other promotional materials. Certain claims may cause a product to be considered a drug, even if the product is marketed as if it were a cosmetic. Such claims establish the product as a drug because the intended use is to treat or prevent disease or otherwise affect the structure or functions of the human body. Some examples are claims that products will restore hair growth, reduce cellulite, treat varicose veins, or revitalize cells.
 

Chalk Creek

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Thanks Faithy and Tab. I'm not sure how I'll label it yet. Neil, I don't think your suggestion will sell much soap!!! :wink: I like "revitalizing" though.
 
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