Cream soap

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SugarLump

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Hi,

I recently made my first batch of cream soap. It turned out beautifully and is currently in the rotting process. However, after I whip it up, it consistently reverts back to a thick creamy butter consistency. Is this normal? Is it supposed to do that? In order to get it to whip up into a thick whipped cream consistency, I have to add a small amount (1-2oz) of distilled water and whip it with my hand mixer. I guess I am confused because I am expecting it to stay nice and light and whipped. Please let me know if I am doing something wrong.

Thanks.
 

DeeAnna

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The heavier texture of your cream soap after it sits for awhile is pretty typical from what I've seen personally and from what I've heard from others, so I'd say that's pretty much the norm for this type of soap. It is not going to be light and fluffy like whipped cream except for the short time right after it is freshly mixed. Lindy says pretty much the same thing around Post 83 in her excellent tutorial on cream soap: http://www.soapmakingforum.com/showthread.php?t=49652

I think the unrealistic expectations that most people new to cream soap (including me) have are created by the secrecy and misinformation surrounding this type of soap. Newbies spend a lot of time and trouble to figure out how to formulate a recipe for cream soap and then have to muster the patience to actually make the soap and then let it sit ("rot") for months until the soap texture stabilizes.

Once the cream soap is made and "rotted", it can be a bit of a disappointment to try it out and realize the soap doesn't stay light and fluffy, it doesn't lather particularly easily, and it can leave an odd waxy or dry feel on the skin after it's rinsed off. But no one really wants to admit that the soap falls short of one's expectations after all that time and trouble. :) While that's an understandable human reaction, it creates a lot of myths and expectations about cream soap that aren't fulfilled by the real thing. If we knew what to really expect when we started, we'd probably be happier at the end.

IMO, cream soap is best used as an ingredient in specialty products like body scrubs, face cleansers, cream shave soaps, and such -- uses that showcase the dense, lush lather that cream soap makes. If memory serves me, there are several soap makers here (lsg, Lindy, and Carolyn/cmzaha come to mind) who make cream soap for use in their products.
 

SugarLump

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Thank you!

DeeAnna,

Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!! Your response said EVERYTHING I was thinking.

After making my soap and letting it rot only to go back to the thick consistency, I felt like I had just been told a joke that I didn't get. I literally thought to myself..."I don't get it."

"IMO, cream soap is best used as an ingredient in specialty products like body scrubs, face cleansers, cream shave soaps, and such -- uses that showcase the dense, lush lather that cream soap makes."

Exactly. If I had been told this from the beginning, I would have had a more reasonable expectation, and understanding of how to use it in my product line.

Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and insight.

SugarLump
 

cmzaha

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You are correct DeeAnna. I have a few products I use it in, my favorite being a salt scrub. Also, please preserve cream soap, it will mold if not. I use Liquid Germall Plus. Cream soap will not really stay fluffy, but usually stiffen up after rot, unless you add in a lot of extra water. I supercream mine, whip it and let it rot, no extra water. More water more chance of mold
 

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