1935 CP Soap

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

lsg

Staff member
Admin
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
Messages
13,341
Reaction score
4,977
That was right in the middle of the Great Depression. I wonder how many people had the money to buy those ingredients.
 

steffamarie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
487
Reaction score
752
Location
St. Louis
That was right in the middle of the Great Depression. I wonder how many people had the money to buy those ingredients.
Very true!! This book also lists recipes for dry cleaning soap, machinery soap (?), solid perfumes, lotions, astringents, and a whole slew of other cosmetic products. I'm really intrigued!!!
 

Relle

Administrator & Bunny Fanatic
Staff member
Admin
SPONSOR
Joined
Sep 23, 2010
Messages
11,222
Reaction score
3,715
So nice to find old books and just have a read of what they did then.
 
Last edited:

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
12,155
Reaction score
16,559
Location
Northeast Iowa, USA
The recipes made big batches because it was a time-consuming royal pain to make soap back in the day before stick blenders. My grandmother usually made enough soap to fill a newspaper-lined peach crate to a dept of 3-4 inches. It too most of an afternoon to do, but it was enough to last the year for laundry.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
12,155
Reaction score
16,559
Location
Northeast Iowa, USA
BG -- Sodium silicate (aka water glass) adds detergency (cleaning power) somewhat like rosin. Its main benefit, however, is to reduce the cost of the soap. By adding water glass, more water can be "hidden" in the soap and still end up with a hard soap. Water glass is made by reacting sodium hydroxide with sand, something a soap maker could easily do. Water and sand are cheap compared to fats. (Rosin was also cheap back in the day, which is why it was also a once-common additive in soap.)

"...Silicated Soaps: Sheridan's Process. — Of all the numerous cheapening substances which have been introduced into pure soaps, the silicate of soda, or soluble glass may be deemed the most important, since it not only favours the introduction of a large percentage of water in certain kinds of soap, but it also possesses in itself a high detergent property...."

Alexander Watt. The art of soap making.
Google a portion of the quote above to find the source.
 

Latest posts

Top