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Thoughts on Sunflower Oil

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LoveOscar

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I have some sunflower oil I want to play with. General recommendations say don't use more than 15 to 20% because it leads to a soft bar. So my question is, can sunflower be used as a majority oil with additions of coconut and shea to make it harder?

For example: SO 30%, OO 30%, CO 30%, Shea 10%

Thank you ahead of time for your thoughts.
 

DeeAnna

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If you have regular "linoleic" sunflower oil, you not only risk a soft bar, but you also risk the soap becoming rancid. My rule of thumb is to keep linoleic + linolenic below 15% and preferably closer to 5%.

If your sunflower is high oleic (labeled as suitable for frying, high temperature, etc), then it's similar to olive oil and you basically have a recipe with 60% olive or olive-like oils in it. Long cure required. Low amount of dense lather.
 

Saintlysoaper

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I have done something very similar to this. It felt great on the skin, was pretty hard but developed DOS quickly:(
 

LoveOscar

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Thanks DeeAnna. It says great for sauteing and frying on the bottle.

I was hoping it would be a feel good bar Saintlysoaper, but don't know if I want to deal with DOS or any rancidity just yet.
 

DeeAnna

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A high oleic sunflower -- which is what it sounds like you have -- is not nearly as prone to rancidity as regular sunflower is. Use it as an alternative to olive, and you'll be fine.
 

mymy

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I bought 2litre of SO yesterday and sadly I didn't check the nutritional info. It's a normal SO that has low mono fat. Should I try 20% with it?
 

DeeAnna

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Check the fatty acid profile of your recipe. If 20% sunflower in your recipe gives you an acceptably low amount of linoleic + linolenic, then go for it.
 

mymy

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total linoleic and linolenic is 18%. If I'm not mistaken, anything over 15% prone to cause DOS?
 

DeeAnna

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"...If I'm not mistaken, anything over 15% prone to cause DOS? ..."

That is the rule of thumb I use.

An antioxidant like rosemary oleoresin (ROE) would help to prevent rancidity if you have your heart set on making this recipe.
 
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