Superfatting 100% coconut oil soap?

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Unsaltedera

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Sooo, i was told to avoid 100% coconut oil soap as it will be too drying.

I also keep reading not too superfast at more than 5%

But i came across a few places that say you could do 100% coconut oil soap and superfat it at around 20% and end up woth a non drying coconut oil soap.

Should i ignore these articles, or should i try it knowing i am going to end up with one mess that could hardly be called soap?

This will be one of my first soap projects, so would rather have my 'failed' soap attempts now, which i k Nd of already did, as I kind of already expect it.
But any advice or words of caution about doing a one oil soap and superfatting it by that much...sorry if this sounds silly, but i am kind of new to this.
 

snappyllama

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Ah, the rule that breaks the rules...

Normally folks avoid more than 20% CO due to over stripping of natural body oils that causes irritation.
Normally folks avoid more than 8% SF to avoid too greasy, DOS prone soaps. I go 6-7%, but a lot of folks like 5% or less. It's individual preference.

BUT... a 100% CO with a 20% SF is loved by lots of folks. With that high of a SF, the drying effect is countered. CO is a very stable oil that doesn't DOS easily or feel greasy in the bar so the high SF is fine. CO makes a very soluble bar. It's one of the only oils that can lather in salt water, so a lot of folks use that recipe (or one similar to it) to make salt bars. Adding a bunch of salt counteracts the tendency of the very soluble 100% CO to wash away to nothing in the shower.

One thing to note is that very high CO bars can harden very fast and be brittle for cutting (this is especially true for salt bars). You might want to use an individual mold or keep a close eyeon how hard it's getting. You might have to cut while the loaf is still warm (using gloves since lye will still be active).
 

Unsaltedera

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Thank you for the quick reply snappyllama!!! Ok i am happy to know as i have a tub of coconut oil,i really want to do many things with from a while, and soap fits the bill...so using it for tjat.

I have some silicone molds i do not know what to do with so will use it to shape the soap, i hope it will not ruin them.
I am also contemplating turning the water to ice before adding the lye to it, as being as accident prone as i am the more safety measures the better. I hope that will not interfere with what kinda nd of coconut soap i end up with??
Thank you for clarifying again!
 

cmzaha

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You do not need to use ice when using water, room temp water is fine. Just use a proper pitcher for you lye and mix in the sink if you want to take extra precaution. I use a rubbermaid pitcher or you can use any plastic with a number 2 or 5 on the bottom. Do not use pyrex for lye, some have had problems with it shattering from the lye etching the newer pyrex
 

LoveOscar

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If all goes planned, tomorrow I'm making an 80% CO salt bar and plan on 20% SF. I have thought about a 100% CO bar, because I enjoy OO castile bars and wanted to compare.

I look forward to seeing your results!
 

Unsaltedera

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Ah a trip down the market is due then...i was planning on using my pyrex as thought heatproof so should work.

Now i really want to do this fast as curious about adding the salt to later on!
For sure i will post the results to when i make them.
Thanks everyone for the help again!
 

BlowinBubbles

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Sorry to hijack...
Will a 100% Coconut Soleseife with 20% SF lather well in salt water?
I'm contemplating something of this nature for my Father inlaws summer boating holiday.
 

Unsaltedera

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If you have borosilicate pyrex, it should be fine. But if you have the newer soda-lime pyrex or if you don't know for sure which type you have, I wouldn't use it.

Here's an infographic that may help you find out which type of pyrex you have:

http://www.buy-it-once.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Pyrex-infographic_optimized.png
Wow,mthanks formthe info, I think it is the new ones as i only recently bought it. I am also having trouble finding a simple rubbermaid measuring cup for some reason.
In youtube videos a lot of people using what looks like ice cream plastic containers to mix their lye and oils.....is that what they are using, and would it be safe to just do the same?

Also another question how do i clean everything up when done....??

Blowinbubbkes hijack away we are all learning something from each other all the time :)
 

shunt2011

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Wow,mthanks formthe info, I think it is the new ones as i only recently bought it. I am also having trouble finding a simple rubbermaid measuring cup for some reason.
In youtube videos a lot of people using what looks like ice cream plastic containers to mix their lye and oils.....is that what they are using, and would it be safe to just do the same?

Also another question how do i clean everything up when done....??

Blowinbubbkes hijack away we are all learning something from each other all the time :)
Rubbermaid pitchers work well for mixing your lye or any pitcher/plastic container that has the correct #. I generally see the #5 in the rectangle on the bottom of the ones I use. Any smallish container with the proper# will work fine.

I have used the Ziploc container with the screw on lids to mix my lye with no issues. They are the taller ones. I have 4 I have been using for well over a year with no problems. Just be sure to always mix your lye in the sink if possible.
 
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Obsidian

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For the first 2 years of soaping, I used plastic measuring cups from the dollar store to mix my lye in. They came in a set, the largest is around 4 cups and its held up well all this time.

I recently got my hands on a stainless steel pitcher though and now I use it for lye.
 

kchaystack

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I use paint mixing containers from Home Depot. Any plastic buckets with a 2 or 5 in the recycling triangle will be fine.

As for clean up, I wipe everything out with a painters cloth, and then let it sit for a day or 2 so that the soap finishes saponification. Then I wash it all in hot water. But I soap in my basement and have space to let stuff sit.
 

Unsaltedera

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Thanks guys. Kchaystack,that is extremely helpful, as where i am it looks easier to get a plastic paint mix bucket than a pitcher. I will also add painters clothes to my long growing list of things i find i 'need' before saponifying that coconut oil!
 
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