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Soap Hardening - cold process, and a rust question.

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contessa

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I recently made my first batch of lard soap (instead of vegetable shortening). From what I understand, the more times you melt and set it, the harder and longer lasting soap you will get - is this true?

Well, I chopped up the first 'setting' and put it in the pot to melt. OMG it stunk up half my house. It was just awful. I changed the heat from high to medium (this helped) and stirred until my arm couldn't stand it anymore, but it started to burn - or smell like burning - again.

It didn't go all the way to liquid, and when I put in just a few oz. of water it didn't blend well. So I scooped it out and put it back in my setting tray.

What in the world is going on? How do I melt the soap to a liquid? How do I keep it from smelling bad?

Also, I accidentally used an aluminum pan. Whats wrong if I get a little rust on my soap? Is this a tetanus issue?
 

Emily Klesick

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Yeah, it is true, if you re melt and re melt your soap it will turn out much longer lasting and harder. Often with a better lather. I would actually shave the rust off of the soap then use it, it wouldn't hurt anything. But don't try and sell it. :) I had some that ate throught the paint on a dresser top, and it turned all red and rusty looking, but I just shaved it off and re melted it. Also using an aluminum pan, will really make it stink!! Also in order to get it to liquid, you need you use a double broiler! If oyu don't use a double broiler, you won't get liquid soap out of it. Hope this helps! :)
 

contessa

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A double boiler! DUH! lol, that makes so much sense, I didn't even think of it. :idea:
 

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