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preservative in bath salt

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momev3

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Do you need to add a preservative to bath salts? How long do they keep?
 

momev3

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Thank you

I have always heard that any kind of preservative is bad. I do plan on selling them, so I will def. be investing. I think I may have a preservative here. It's probably no good anymore though. I love making b&b, But sometimes lack confidence. I have never had any bad reactions, I just always think What if?... So I will def. buy a preservative. Thank you so much for your reply. :D
 

jones10021

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preservatives are not good for you. Salt is a preservative on its own.
 

digitalmayhem

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All of these overgeneralizatons about "preservatives are not good" are NOT helpful...

This is going to come out harsh, but it needs to be said:


1) If you don't know if your product needs a preservative, you should not be selling it yet. Period.

2) Not all preservatives are bad.

3) Pathogens, bacteria, and mold are far worse than the worst preservative.



If you're advocating that all preservatives are bad, you need to do more research--and you certainly shouldn't be selling anything. You're going to hurt someone.



That said-- I make a solid oil based salt scrub and do not use a preservative, but I state *explicitly* that you CANNOT introduce water to the scrub because it does not have a preservative. I state *explicitly* that a portion of the scrub should be removed for use and the scrub itself should not be kept in the shower.
 

momev3

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It's o.k. to be harsh sometimes.

I certainly have done alot of research. Maybe I just haven't looked in the right place. That is why I asked here. I do not sell anything unless I am positively sure it is absolutely safe. Unfortunately I usely go in the hole, because I am my own worse critic. Like most. :D I would never sell anything to anyone that would be harmful. Plus I let them sample my products first if they'd like. Some people have allergic reactions to somethings, when they have never had a reaction to it before. It's not because your product is bad, it could be an eo or even an underlying problem. My family and I can use Tide with no reaction, an then one day for some odd reason we will have a reaction from it. Then we can use it again later. I really appreciate your input. It is nice to have different perspectives. I will def. use a preservative, But only after I research the very best one for you.
Thank you, :D
 

Tabitha

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I am going have to agree 100% w/ digitalmayhem.

I have opened moldy bath salts which is nasty & dangerous. I would use a preservative for sure.

Salt is not a recognized preservative by the FDA.

Personally I am far more concerned about the food I put into my body than the agents that run over it & are then rinsed off.

Preservatives do get a bad rap & 90% of the time the people who are worried about preservatives in bath products are not at all concerned about hormones in meat, pesticides on fruits & veggies or preservatives in *any* canned or boxed grocery item.
 

mandolyn

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This is a very interesting & seems, sometimes, contraversial thread.

I get really confused & verrrry scared reading some posts regarding the use of preservatives.

I finally decided to go have a look at the big dog on the block - Burt's Bees. I consider them the leader of the pack when it comes to all & nearly natural B&B products.

I'm amazed at how few of their products use preservatives. If you haven't read their ingredients labels, or haven't for a while, go have a look. I think you'll be surprised.

These are the preservatives I've seen on there:
glucose oxidase, lactoperoxidase (sugar & natural enzymes)

Here's a link to their Ingredients Glossery (bottom right of page):
http://www.myburtsbees.co.uk/proddetail ... urtsbanana

The scary stuff is at the bottom of the glossery. :shock:
 
G

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That said-- I make a solid oil based salt scrub and do not use a preservative, but I state *explicitly* that you CANNOT introduce water to the scrub because it does not have a preservative. I state *explicitly* that a portion of the scrub should be removed for use and the scrub itself should not be kept in the shower.
I make a solid oil salt scrub, I add preserve to it simply because it will react with water and used in water. People tend not to follow directions, if they read them at all. The moisture in the air, steam from the shower period was enough for me to add a preserve since I know it has to come in contact with water. You should consider adding it simply because consumers just dont listen to directions....

For my bath salts, I sold them for years.. I added preserve simply because I added color to them, which was in liquid form. Although it dried, it was enough for me to consider a preserve for shelf life. I have tested with salts sitting in the shower unused, with them sitting in the bathroom on the vanity unused.. and the same ways opened...

The one without the preserve over time did start turning colors.... I am not saying put alot of preserve in it, but you should consider it.
Most of my products that I know will go into the bathroom... have a preserve...
The only thing that doesnt, is my lip balm I use to make..but it contains Vitamin E.
Now some say "Its not a preserve" some say "It Is"
Guess what... I tested it over trial and error and a lot of time over years.. and I have never had a problem with using VIt. E in my lip balm.

If you are unsure about preserves... its time to read more on them.
 

brylle

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i was wondering about this for a long time specially for people intending, or did not intentionally intend, of storing bath salts for a long time. I've read that the salt isn't exactly the one needing the preservative but the other stuff that you add in the bath salts.
 
G

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digitalmayhem said:
You're going to hurt someone.
Puleeze. I seem to remember someone's signature saying "If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all." While what most of what you said was true, there certanly is a nicer way to say it.

There are plenty of natural preservatives on the market, but if you think that your customer base will be affected because you don't use one at all you can put on there "Preservative Free" thataway it is a selling point and a warning. As always, when in doubt check out the Weston A Price Foundation.
 

mandolyn

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La Oberhasli said:
digitalmayhem said:
You're going to hurt someone.
There are plenty of natural preservatives on the market, but if you think that your customer base will be affected because you don't use one at all you can put on there "Preservative Free" thataway it is a selling point and a warning. As always, when in doubt check out the Weston A Price Foundation.
That's my plan. I'm also packaging most of my products in small containers, so they're more likely to get used up before they go bad. Some items like bath salts & milk baths are in one or two-time-use packages. They're in pourable-only containers as well. Then I'll give quantity discounts when they purchase several.

Right now, I'm steering clear of many products that will grow germs, especially lotions. My whole philosophy embraces no preservatives & recyclable packaging, so I just won't sell some products.

Love your sig line!! :D
 

antella

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I agree with scotsoap. I make them and never add anything but the salts and the fragrance and even oat and milk powders. No mold happens because there is no water and the pkging is sealed to keep out moisture.

I prefer to steer clear of preservatives whenever I can and not have to spend that much more cash on them besides all the other stuff I have to buy to make my products.
 

lsg

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Puleeze. I seem to remember someone's signature saying "If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all." While what most of what you said was true, there certanly is a nicer way to say it.
I entirely agree with your statement. More experienced members sometimes forget that us newbies are asking questions to learn. If we feel like we are being criticized then we won't feel comfortable sharing or asking questions.
 

antella

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lsg said:
Puleeze. I seem to remember someone's signature saying "If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all." While what most of what you said was true, there certanly is a nicer way to say it.
I entirely agree with your statement. More experienced members sometimes forget that us newbies are asking questions to learn. If we feel like we are being criticized then we won't feel comfortable sharing or asking questions.[quote:3jyw5y8o]
[/quote:3jyw5y8o]

Agreed, and this also is true of newbie unanswered posts, too. There are ones with zero replies on nearly every page in these forums, many I would also like to know the answers to. I try to always do a search before I ask anything and I wouldn't ask if I could find all the info I needed there.
 

Tabitha

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I agree with scotsoap. I make them and never add anything but the salts and the fragrance and even oat and milk powders. No mold happens because there is no water and the pkging is sealed to keep out moisture.
The fragrance or essential oils you add to the salts make them wet. If you seal wet salt up into an airtight container you WILL get mold.

Agreed, and this also is true of newbie unanswered posts, too. There are ones with zero replies on nearly every page in these forums, many I would also like to know the answers to. I try to always do a search before I ask anything and I wouldn't ask if I could find all the info I needed there.
Maybe you are under the wrong impression. Moderators and other people with soap knowledge do not get paid to spend 3-4-5 hours a day answering every single thread in this forum, which is what it would take to address them all. I make it a general rule of thumb to address as many threads as I have time for 3-4 times a day. Sorry to say , that is not near enought time to answer every single one.

There are a whole lot of experienced soapmakers on this form who kindly share information.
 

mandolyn

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It's been a long time since this thread began, so I'm updating you on where I am now with preservative use.

I did more research, in fact, I've done research continually since this thread began on this subject.

I now use preservatives.

What I've learned along the way is that we use preservatives in such small quantities in our handcrafted b&b products that they're not harmful.

Liquid Germall Plus's usage rate is .1% - .5%. That's not much!!! At .1% that's .008 oz per 8 oz bottle of lotion. That's far less harmful than a jar of lotion with microbes you can't see running about in it.

When I hand a jar of my emulsified scrub to a customer, I know they will be safe using it. There are no what if's going through my mind. I sleep better knowing my customers won't have microbials, mold, mildew or fungi growing in their products.

The other thing I've learned is that disclaimors won't protect you. If you're sued, you will still have to make an appearance in a courtroom. That means attorney's fees, etc. I'd rather not have to go there. Period!!! There's enough to worry about with people having possible reactions to ingredients without also worrying about unpreserved product.

Something that crossed my mind recently is this. There are people who say you don't need a preservative in an oil-based product, because germs can't grow there.

Bacteria lives on garbage pails, on surfaces when someone coughs or sneeses. If mommy changes a diaper, then puts her hand into a tin of salve, is she transferring bacteria? Childcare workers pass salmonilla from one child to another by not washing their hands between diaper changes. Can that bacteria be transferred to a tin of salve?

Something to consider.
 

carebear

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Yes you can TRANSFER bacteria that way - same as touching a surface (such as the OUTSIDE of the jar), but they won't multiply and become even more problematic without available water.
 
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