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Is there a delayed pouring technique?

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MrsSpaceship

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For the most part, almost everything I have seen or read so far implies for you to get all your soaping done as quickly as possible with as few batches as possible. Is there maybe a technique that I just don't know the name of that involves some delay time between layers and multiple batches?

I've seen where people do smaller scale like embeds or confetti soaps, so in my mind, this should work on a larger scale, in fact nothing comes to mind really that would make this more prone to a fail except maybe not having the layers adhere properly.

To clarify, is there any reason why I wouldn't be able to make a soap by making a small batch first, pouring it, letting it set, lets say at least overnight, making another small batch (maybe a different recipe or texture) and pouring it over the top of the first, etc.?

I see the pro being more control, and the con being an extended cure time depending on how many layers are used, what are your thoughts?
 

newbie

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I make only small batches and often several batches in one day. Sellers have more need to make large batches at once, for inventory reasons.

If you like layers and having your lines very straight between them, you can certainly pour, cover and let it set overnight and then pour your next one. They should stick together fine. I think most of us have little patience and want to have a batch done so we can get into it the next day and see how it went. Doing a soap over several days prolongs the agony of seeing if your finished product is what you hoped. Also, if life gets in your way and you can't finish, it could be more difficult to get your layers to stay together if one part has had more time to cure and have water evaporate.
 

Obsidian

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I would worry about the first layers getting too hard for a smooth cut, especially if you wait a day between each. Wouldn't it be better to only wait a couple hours between?
 

jcandleattic

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If you wait a day between batches, you run the risk of the layers separating once out of the mold. You would have to ensure gel EACH time you did a new pour, so it could at least have a chance to stay together.

As long as the batter is stiff/thick enough to hold the next layer, there really is no reason to wait beyond that, and it will help the soap gel - but even if you don't gel, if it's still wet, and you pour your next layer, and the original layer is thick enough to hold the top layer, then it will stay together once saponified.

Me personally, I wouldn't have the patience to wait days upon days to pour each layer. Especially to only then have the layers separate.
 

Seawolfe

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You could make your own melt and pour soap, you could make completely separate batches, or you could master batch your recipe and just combine the lye/oils/fragrance/colors when needed. Or somehow a combination of these.
 

MrsSpaceship

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If you like layers and having your lines very straight between them, you can certainly pour, cover and let it set overnight and then pour your next one. They should stick together fine. I think most of us have little patience and want to have a batch done so we can get into it the next day and see how it went. Doing a soap over several days prolongs the agony of seeing if your finished product is what you hoped. Also, if life gets in your way and you can't finish, it could be more difficult to get your layers to stay together if one part has had more time to cure and have water evaporate.[/quote]
Not only straight lines, but I was thinking of getting some extreme texture between the layers. I can see how some view the extended time as a test of patience, but CP is my breaking away from the need for instant gratification (in a manner of speaking), so I view it as making the fun last longer. I think the adhesion is my main concern, so when I get around to testing it, it will be with a pretty small batch.

I would worry about the first layers getting too hard for a smooth cut, especially if you wait a day between each. Wouldn't it be better to only wait a couple hours between?
Good point, I didn't think about that.

If you wait a day between batches, you run the risk of the layers separating once out of the mold. You would have to ensure gel EACH time you did a new pour, so it could at least have a chance to stay together.

As long as the batter is stiff/thick enough to hold the next layer, there really is no reason to wait beyond that, and it will help the soap gel - but even if you don't gel, if it's still wet, and you pour your next layer, and the original layer is thick enough to hold the top layer, then it will stay together once saponified.

Me personally, I wouldn't have the patience to wait days upon days to pour each layer. Especially to only then have the layers separate.
Having them fall apart is a big concern, but as I mentioned above, it's not just about the straight lines, I would kind of be hoping that the extreme texture would help keep the two parts together... Like velcro. I'm also learning to pace myself so I don't overwhelm us with soap and blow through my supplies in a week, so the layer idea seemed a good way to draw out the fun.

You could make your own melt and pour soap, you could make completely separate batches, or you could master batch your recipe and just combine the lye/oils/fragrance/colors when needed. Or somehow a combination of these.
is there a melt and pour version of CP? I only know of the glycerin type, and while I will do that at some point, for the sake of my husbands sanity I'll let him get used to the trappings of CP & HP before I bring in even more stuff. I can just see him "You mean you bought all those oils and stuff when you could have just started out with stuff you melt, pour and get soap?!?" LOL. He's supportive, but it's best not to push it.
 

Dorymae

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It can be done. That is exactly how I made my "brick wall soap" but I didn't wait a full 24 hours to cut my "bricks" only until it was firm enough to be cut without squishing. (About 13 hours). Then I made my "mortar" (new soap) placed my bricks and poured in the new soap. I had no problem with the soap separating from one another, mainly (I believe) because the bricks were still fresh soap. (Now the soap is hard as a rock and looks and feels like soap poured in one sitting)

Depending on the look you want, you can use this technique successfully. Just use common sense and remember that the older a soap is, the harder it will be to combine another soap with it.
 

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I pour, cover, and then pour another layer the following day with no problems at all. I've never had the layers separate and I often don't gel so gelling is not necessary to keep the layers together. If you were to gel the first layer and then pour the next one on top, I think the chances are higher (bit not 100%) of it not holding because of the difference in structure within the soap at that time. The hardness factor and cutting may play in if you have made layers of soap over 5 days or something, but with landscape soaps, there is often a 3 days window of people putting them together.
 

MrsSpaceship

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Dorymae and Newbie,
Thank you both for your success stories!! I'm so excited to hear that this has worked for you both.
Now I'm off to stalk Dorymae to hopefully see pictures of this brick wall soap.
 
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