difference between stick blender and whisk blender for whipped soap

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selinayeee

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Hi everyone,:)


I've successfully made my very first batch of soap with whipped cream icing effect on top.
I stick blend the thin trace for several seconds more for it to reach a thick trace and just pipe it on.

However I've seen pictures/tutorials of people make the icing with a whisk blender to get more air in it.
It seems like this technique takes a lot more effort for it to reach the correct texture for piping as well.

My question is what's the differences/pros/cons between these two techniques?
Any reasons that people willing to whisking it for 30 to 40 minutes when u can reach a thick trace in several seconds?
or they are actually completely two different products that am not aware of. very confused :confused::confused::confused:


Thanks!
 
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BattleGnome

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There is a thing called floap. The name comes from what it is: floating soap.

To make floap you use hard oils and whip them like egg whites before adding your lye solution. The march challenge was floap, so there are quite a few recent posts about it.
 

SuzieOz

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Hi and welcome selinayeee :)

Whenever I do a "whipped cream" look on my soap, I just do what you do and stick blend until it is super thick, then pipe it on using an icing bag and nozzle. Works for me! I haven't tried any other way so I can't comment on pros and cons.

Suzie
 

DeeAnna

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"...Any reasons that people willing to whisking it for 30 to 40 minutes when u can reach a thick trace in several seconds? ..."

When you bring a soap to heavy trace, you generally only have a very short time in which to work before the soap sets up too much. Whipped soap stays workable for a longer time.
 

TwystedPryncess

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I am not sure if this is in any way what you are looking for, but I often pipe decorations on the tops of my soaps. In fact, it's my favorite thing to do.

To keep it short and sweet, I just let my soap batter sit in piping bags until it's at the consistency I need it to be to pipe what I want. Vines need a bit of a thinner trace, a foamy swirl thicker, etc. Think of soap as icing you don't have to fool around as much with.

Again, this isn't pertaining to the foamy stuff, but an altogether another type of technique. One you need piping tips and bags for and whatnot. Not sure if those are used with the other, as I haven't gotten that far.
 
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