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Would be fun to try, but would like a good recipe!

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SoapyGoats

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Back again, folks!

Anyway, I've been wanting to try an oatmeal/honey CP Goats' Milk soap. ( got a oatmeal/honey FO so might as well use it in that kind of soap!) But, I would like a good recipe first.

Want kind of oatmeal do you use? Honey? Beeswax? Oils to balance the honey or beeswax?

Thanks in advance!
 

IrishLass

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I like to use baby oatmeal in my oatmeal/goatmilk/honey soap. I buy the Earth's Best brand wholegrain oatmeal cereal. It comes in really fine flakes, and it's so nice because it doesn't make my soap scratchy. I use 1 tablespoon ppo.

For honey- I use whatever I have on hand (many times orange blossom honey or citrus honey), which is always raw. I use 1 tbsp. ppo, and I mix it with a little water and then add it into my cooled lye solution shortly before soaping.

I'm not experienced soaping with beeswax, so I have no words of wisdom to offer where that is concerned.

As for oils, I really don't think it matters too very much. I've used my combo of oatmeal, goatmilk and honey in a couple of different formulas (bastille and also tallow/lard), and it's always come out nice.


IrishLass :)
 

dibbles

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I use oat milk instead of water for lye solution, 1 T/ppo honey dissolved in a little warm water, and colloidal oats (oatmeal ground really fine) mixed with a little almond oil (any oil would be fine). Honey and colloidal oats added at light trace. But I like IL's idea of baby oatmeal - never thought of that!

Oat milk is very easy to make, you just need to plan a little ahead. If you want to try it, let me know and I'll tell you what I do. There are a few youtube videos as well.
 

snappyllama

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I use colloidal oatmeal pretty often at 1tbsp ppo. I think both it and honey are easiest to blend into my oils ahead of time. I actually make a slurry with some of my batch water... FO, clay, sugar/honey, SL, oatmeal, powdered milk, whatever else all get blended up with my mini-frother, then that mixture gets blended into my oils before I add my lye solution.

If you're doing honey + goat's milk, be careful for overheating.

I like the idea about baby oatmeal, I'll have to go down the smiling baby aisle next time I'm at the grocery store!
 

Saponista

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I use oat powder in mine, from a protein supplement company. It's super fine so it blends into the bars really easily. Makes them feel lovely and silky.
 

tbeck3579

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Most of my personal soaps have oatmeal and honey. I use various milks and infusions in place of the water. Freeze the milk and add your lye to the frozen milk (there are Youtube videos on it). My recipe is a variation of the Nerdy Farm Wife's (plug your recipe into soap calc if you change the oils). I use generic oats and grind until they look like flour. Many people have said honey speeds trace, but it doesn't cause a problem for me. I use honey from my bee hives so I know it is "real" honey. Because American bees are dying (everyone knows it's the GMO's except Monsanto and our government -- yikes, sorry) a lot of the cheaper American honey is imported. It's labeled "pure", no additives and I'm sure some portion of that bottle was pure at one point :silent:. I dunno if it's the honey or the recipe, but a fair number of people have reported trace happens too fast.

Nerdy's Soap -- Click Here For Recipe
 

not_ally

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Total aside, I was surprised at how much more baby OM is than the regular kind! Those little things are expensive!

Sorry, just had to get this in so that I could imagine EG and all you other parents rolling your eyes and thinking "you have NO idea, lady :)".
 

aprice522

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I personally use the honey that has started to crystalize in our cabinet. (we eat a lot but sometimes it goes...) I have a batch to use up so that is why my thread just a second ago talks about this same soap, but looking for EO scent guidance.

(so everyone...go find my thread too and comment!!! :) )

I have a container of whole oats from Aldi's that send through the food processor and store. I made a great cookie recipe from it (actually made some today) so I always have a decent amount on hand.

My recipe, untried and unknown, is Tallow 45, OO 30, CO 20, castor 5
(hey...I'm new--won't know for another 3 weeks if it is decent cause I tried it last week too)

I am adding silk to the lye with milk slush.

I will add the honey/EO to the oil and oatmeal at light trace.
 

spenny92

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I literally just made a goat's milk, oats and honey batch so my memory is still fresh! There are plenty of great recipes shared on this forum, hunt around and find one that you like, or formulate your own if you feel like it. Just plug the numbers into SoapCalc to get the right amount of lye and liquid.

I sub all of my water for frozen goat's milk, add honey and ground oatmeal at trace and scent with OMH FO. Popped in the freezer as it can overheat, and I prefer the texture of non-gelled soaps when I'm using GM.

I wouldn't use beeswax unless you feel that you really need to. It sounds very tricky to work with, and if you have a good recipe, it should be hard enough without the beeswax. I normally use manuka honey or just regular local honey, and plain rolled oats but I blend them until they're finely ground.
 

TheDragonGirl

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I personally use the honey that has started to crystalize in our cabinet. (we eat a lot but sometimes it goes...) I have a batch to use up so that is why my thread just a second ago talks about this same soap, but looking for EO scent guidance.
If you put your honey jar in a pot of gently boiling water the crystals will disappear :) honey basically never goes bad
 

TeresaT

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I personally use the honey that has started to crystalize in our cabinet. (we eat a lot but sometimes it goes...)
Ha! That's when I like it best. My coworker is a beekeeper and I get honey from him. I use it for my tea and it is much easier to use when it's crystallized. Easier to eat that way, too. I guess I just like my food to crunch.
 

tbeck3579

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I personally use the honey that has started to crystalize in our cabinet. (we eat a lot but sometimes it goes...) I have a batch to use up so that is why my thread just a second ago talks about this same soap, but looking for EO scent guidance.

(so everyone...go find my thread too and comment!!! :) )

I have a container of whole oats from Aldi's that send through the food processor and store. I made a great cookie recipe from it (actually made some today) so I always have a decent amount on hand.

My recipe, untried and unknown, is Tallow 45, OO 30, CO 20, castor 5
(hey...I'm new--won't know for another 3 weeks if it is decent cause I tried it last week too)

I am adding silk to the lye with milk slush.

I will add the honey/EO to the oil and oatmeal at light trace.
Just a little fun factoid I picked up at my beekeepers meetings -- honey doesn't go bad. Warm the honey and the crystals disappear. A food that doesn't expire! Who knew? Haha, I see someone else has already said that... Late to the party as usual.

http://www.soapmakingforum.com//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/extension/
 

DeeAnna

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Just warm it as gently as possible ... low and slow is better than high and fast. The delicate floral fragrance of raw honey disappears if it becomes too warm. My rule of thumb is to never heat honey any warmer than it would get in the hive ... so maybe about 100 to105 deg F tops.
 

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