Whirlwind technique

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mx6inpenn

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Yes, I can see comparisons to both cosmic wave and Clyde slide, but without the typical zigzag. Maybe the cut is the all-important factor. I might have time to play with it in the next year or two. :-D
 

newbie

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The blue soap, with that cut, almost ensures that the soap was poured in one place and not moved around during the pour, as one thinks of in a Clyde Slide. Nor is it from a multitude of small circles, as in the video because it would not give that deeper center of blue in the corner of the cut. I think they were poured in one deep pour which spread out, or perhaps the person poured several spots but kept them deep and then for the cut, it was made so the corners were about centered in the middle of the circle.

Dang, it is really hard to talk about some of this stuff just in type! I have no idea if anyone would get what I am saying.
 

CaraBou

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I had the same thought as newbie, that it's a corner pour. The wide concentric circles further out support that, and also suggest to me that it was not just an ITP (though part of it likely was).

Someone crack the code and let's give it a try!
 

mx6inpenn

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All of the links provided do show promise for figuring it out. I was thinking a slab mold with itp load like Clyde slide. Only way I could think of was 4 pots, all poured at the same time a few inches from the corner. The cut would be critical for the blue one. Wonder if I can get hubby to pour with me??? It'll be a while before I get a chance to play with it, too many other things to do first.

If someone else figures it out specifically sooner, that's great too!

A couple more examples I've come across...

1483926883300.jpg


1483926895470.jpg
 

earlene

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I keep seeing variations of the "whirlwind technique" on pintrest but haven't been able to track down any videos or tutorials. Anyone have suggestions for how this was done?
This is the facebook page of the first one:

https://www.facebook.com/soap.baby.home/

This is their online shop:

http://www.shop2000.com.tw/soapbaby

I think the maker is in Taiwan.

They have a 'soap baby art school' or 'soap baby art academy' according to the Google Translation. It looks the technique is taught in their soap classes. There are some videos up, but I couldn't find any that show how the pour is done.

I hope you guys figure it out. It sure is pretty!


ETA:

In photo number 55 from the second link, maybe there is a clue. It shows a soaping class pouring concentric circles into a small paper cup. The wooden mold on the table looks like it is perhaps similar to a tall & skinny but more like the shape of those cube soaps, with maybe room enough for a few soaps (can't see the whole thing, so not sure how long the loaf is). Maybe each cup is poured simultaneously next to each other. Or maybe there are dividers? BB has a silicone cubed soap mold, but I think the soaps don't end up the same size as soap.baby's soaps. The square soap seems to work really well with this design.
 
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cherrycoke216

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The blue soap, with that cut, almost ensures that the soap was poured in one place and not moved around during the pour, as one thinks of in a Clyde Slide. Nor is it from a multitude of small circles, as in the video because it would not give that deeper center of blue in the corner of the cut. I think they were poured in one deep pour which spread out, or perhaps the person poured several spots but kept them deep and then for the cut, it was made so the corners were about centered in the middle of the circle.

Dang, it is really hard to talk about some of this stuff just in type! I have no idea if anyone would get what I am saying.

Is it feather in-the-pot swirl plus what newbie described above combines together?
Just a guess. Haha!

Http://soaptechniques.blogspot.tw/2015/09/feathered-in-pot-swirl.html?m=1

This is the facebook page of the first one:

https://www.facebook.com/soap.baby.home/

This is their online shop:

http://www.shop2000.com.tw/soapbaby

I think the maker is in Taiwan.

They have a 'soap baby art school' or 'soap baby art academy' according to the Google Translation. It looks the technique is taught in their soap classes. There are some videos up, but I couldn't find any that show how the pour is done.

I hope you guys figure it out. It sure is pretty!


ETA:

In photo number 55 from the second link, maybe there is a clue. It shows a soaping class pouring concentric circles into a small paper cup. The wooden mold on the table looks like it is perhaps similar to a tall & skinny but more like the shape of those cube soaps, with maybe room enough for a few soaps (can't see the whole thing, so not sure how long the loaf is). Maybe each cup is poured simultaneously next to each other. Or maybe there are dividers? BB has a silicone cubed soap mold, but I think the soaps don't end up the same size as soap.baby's soaps. The square soap seems to work really well with this design.

I'm Taiwanese. And you can't see it because she's selling a single YouTube tutorial video for like $80 USD. A 4 day soapy boot camp ( 12 soaps lessons and take-home soap ) for $900 something USD. I suck at math.

You have great patience and good eye. But I turn all the way up the brightness of my phone screen, I cannot see soap in the wooden/ bamboo loaf thing. I think it's a wooden cover on it. ( same color )

But the soap cup thing is confirmed by my eye.
Don't trust me on all that, I'm in early 30s, but have Graves' disease & exophthalmos ( bulging eye caused by Graves' disease, hyperthyroidism) so hope someone with a better eye sight can confirm what I saw.
 
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earlene

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I'm Taiwanese. And you can't see it because she's selling a single YouTube tutorial video for like $80 USD. A 4 day soapy boot camp ( 12 soaps lessons and take-home soap ) for $900 something USD. I suck at math.

You have great patience and good eye. But I turn all the way up the brightness of my phone screen, I cannot see soap in the wooden/ bamboo loaf thing. I think it's a wooden cover on it. ( same color )

But the soap cup thing is confirmed by my eye.
Don't trust me on all that, I'm in early 30s, but have Graves' disease & exophthalmos ( bulging eye caused by Graves' disease, hyperthyroidism) so hope someone with a better eye sight can confirm what I saw.
Wow, that's one expensive soapmaking class! Thank you for that information. I sometimes wonder how much the Google Translator misses when I use it to be able to read a foreign-language website.

I am using a computer monitor and it's easier to see the picture probably. If I was looking at it on my phone, I doubt I would be able to make out much.

I went to a two-day soapy bootcamp for a grand total of $125 US dollars here in the MidWest from a certified HSCG Soap Instructor (Handcrafter Soap & Cosmetics Guild) last year. I knew it was a bargain at the time, but because our instructor is in the MidWest and maybe because renting the space where she teaches is so inexpensive, she manages to keep the costs down. She did a great job teaching and we stay in contact and see each other and other former students at conferences. I feel so lucky to have been able to find such an affordable class. I know not everyone has that option.
 

cherrycoke216

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Wow, that's one expensive soapmaking class! Thank you for that information. I sometimes wonder how much the Google Translator misses when I use it to be able to read a foreign-language website.

I am using a computer monitor and it's easier to see the picture probably. If I was looking at it on my phone, I doubt I would be able to make out much.

I went to a two-day soapy bootcamp for a grand total of $125 US dollars here in the MidWest from a certified HSCG Soap Instructor (Handcrafter Soap & Cosmetics Guild) last year. I knew it was a bargain at the time, but because our instructor is in the MidWest and maybe because renting the space where she teaches is so inexpensive, she manages to keep the costs down. She did a great job teaching and we stay in contact and see each other and other former students at conferences. I feel so lucky to have been able to find such an affordable class. I know not everyone has that option.

Thanks for sharing the price of Midwest soap class. Considering GDP, Big Mac Index, minimum wage of two countries, that is quite some money she asked. Maybe she's good, or even great, but her base is at the rural part of Taiwan, thus lower rent,cost to host a class. Though she's working with different locations, but her charges are higher than minimum wages per month here. I doubt that she will have a lot of 4 -days-boot-camp students.
 

aihrat

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I keep seeing variations of the "whirlwind technique" on pintrest but haven't been able to track down any videos or tutorials. Anyone have suggestions for how this was done?

View attachment 23247

View attachment 23248
This looks almost exactly like a corner ombre pour (a la Veronica Foale), except you are using two jugs of colourant instead of one. Veronica Foale demonstrates the corner pour with a single jug of colourant here:

Just a few weeks ago I managed to (accidentally) make a soap that looked very similar by using Foale's corner ombre pour but only stirring the mica loosely in the batter before pouring (I was trying to make wisps). This was a single-jug pour though.

IMG_5869.jpeg

I am 95% certain that you can achieve the whirlwind effect by performing a diagonal gradient ombre pour like in the video, but instead of using a single jug of soap batter and gradually darkening the batter as you pour repeatedly on the same side, you split your batch into two jugs. In one jug you would keep the soap batter uncoloured, in the other jug you would keep the progressively darkening soap batter like a regular gradient pour.

You would alternate between the coloured and uncoloured batter when you are pouring.

I'm not as sure how the variations of colour (other than base vs. colourant) are done. My guess is that the colourant might be loosely swirled in the gradient jug as well?
 
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aihrat

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This looks almost exactly like a corner ombre pour (a la Veronica Foale), except you are using two jugs of colourant instead of one. Veronica Foale demonstrates the corner pour with a single jug of colourant here:

Just a few weeks ago I managed to (accidentally) make a soap that looked very similar by using Foale's corner ombre pour but only stirring the mica loosely in the batter before pouring (I was trying to make wisps). This was a single-jug pour though.

View attachment 35911

I am 95% certain that you can achieve the whirlwind effect by performing a diagonal gradient ombre pour like in the video, but instead of using a single jug of soap batter and gradually darkening the batter as you pour repeatedly on the same side, you split your batch into two jugs. In one jug you would keep the soap batter uncoloured, in the other jug you would keep the progressively darkening soap batter like a regular gradient pour.

You would alternate between the coloured and uncoloured batter when you are pouring.

I'm not as sure how the variations of colour (other than base vs. colourant) are done. My guess is that the colourant might be loosely swirled in the gradient jug as well?
Edit: I think I was only able to somewhat replicate the pink soap in the OP and not the blue one, so this is probably not the actual way of doing it, sorry. :(((

Hello, in case anyone is still interested in this, I was able to test this theory recently and I think it is correct.

The whirlwind technique is simply a corner ombre pour as done by Veronica Foale, except between the layers of coloured soap you would layer white soap as well.

You can see that I was able to replicate the general pattern here, though not to the same degree of fineness in the layers as in the example soaps. The reason for this is that my soap batter was quite thick, and I had poured multiple passes of the white soap.

In the future, I will keep the batter for the white soap more fluid, add some titanium or zinc oxide, and only do a single white streak at once when layering the white soap.

I hope this helps a little.

image0.jpg
 
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