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Which Molds?

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Chappyk

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I am wondering since just being new at soap making what do people suggest as good starter molds? A single bar plastic mold or a silicone bar sheet mold that would make 6 or more. I want to make standard size soap bars.
 

Seawolfe

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I used an acrylic drawer divider lined with plastic wrap, and empty Pringles tubes for my first soaps. I've graduated to a 2 lb wooden mold from Soap Making Resource with build in cutter (after a lot of research and I love it), and a square silicon cake mold that can do 4 lbs of soap, but I'm rubbish at cutting straight bars so far. I'm not sure there is a standard size of soap bars? 4-6 ounces maybe? But then again I like small bars so I can use several types so what do I know?
 

eyeroll

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I used tupperware or casserole pans lined with plastic wrap.
 

jules92207

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I had an older silicone cake pan I started with. I am also cut challenged so I eventually got the silicone cavity mold at brambleberry for pretty cheap. I like that it makes uniform sized bars and pretty easy to work with when I am patient enough for the soap to harden enough. I often try to take them out too soon and hate myself after. :rolleyes:
 

navigator9

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Oooh! Did the Pringles tube have to be lined? I'd definitely like to try making circular soap slices.
Another option for round soaps is a Crystal Lite container. You can use them over and over again. Here's what I do. Save the lid, it will become the bottom. Carefully slice off the bottom, a serrated knife does the job, but be careful, because the plastic is slippery! This end will be a bit uneven, but that's OK, because the uneven bottom becomes the top. Put the lid back on the smooth end, and put a bit of duct tape on just to be sure the end doesn't fall off when you lift the container. Don't ask me how I know this!!! The plastic sides of the container are smooth as glass, so it's easy to get the soap out. Just take off the lid, and push it out. If it doesn't want to slide out, put it in the freezer for a while, take it out, roll it on the counter with the palm of your hand, and it should slide right out. These containers make beautiful soap. I have everyone at work saving them for me!

Back to the original poster's question, if money is no object, a silicone lined wooden loaf mold would be the way to go for standard bars. Silicone makes soaping easy because you don't have to line the mold yourself. It also makes it easy to get the soap out of the mold. But there are also stand-alone silicone molds which are a lot cheaper. It's not hard to build a wooden mold. I have no carpentry skills and I made one. Then you can buy a roll of freezer paper to line it and you're in business. You could also use a cardboard box, or any other kind of box, lined with plastic or freezer paper. My first batch was made in a cardboard milk carton. Just tear it away when the soap is done. So there you are, from expensive to free. If you want to make soap, you can always find something to use as a mold. Soapers are quite inventive!!!
 

AustinStraight

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When I first started, I just used steel loaf pans lined with parchment paper. Works fine, but it's a pain having to line the molds with parchment paper each time... I just got a silicone loaf mold for my birthday and can't wait to use it :-D If you get a silicone mold, it's best to also make a cardboard box that perfectly fits around the mold to prevent it from bowing when you pour the soap in it.
 

Seawolfe

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Oooh! Did the Pringles tube have to be lined? I'd definitely like to try making circular soap slices.
Although some people do line them, I never have - I just tear the container off the soap. Works a treat.
 

Seawolfe

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Lol, my husband loves when I come home with a couple tubes of Pringles and instruct him to eat them :D
 

OliveOil2

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The quart size milk or juice containers that are wax coated paper work great for your first few batches. I have seen people use them vertically, or cut one side out and use like a log mold. Depending on your recipe size you could also use the half gallon size.
 

Kansas Farm Girl

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I have a wooden loaf mold I made and a couple of silicone molds that I use, but the first many batches where in freezer paper lined shoe boxes, boot boxes, unlined plastic containers and anything else I could find. I have a friend who like real cream in her coffee so she saves every quart wax lined cream carton she uses for me and I cut the sides off, lay them on their side and use those quite a bit, specially for smaller batches, or if I want to split a batch and use different scents/colors in each. There are so many possibilities, just look around, you will find something that will help you decide what size you prefer. Once you know what size you like you can look for something that will make bars that size or make loaves or flats that can be cut into your preferred size.
 

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