when to use Tallow oil

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tarkus

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Hi all,

so far I made a few different soaps and it looks like all of them are good quality. today I ordered potassium lye to make liquid version soaps and I ordered tallow without knowing what is it good for. I didn't do my home work to understand the purpose first. so far i used

coconut, palm, caster, olive, seabuckthorn, hemp, honey, clay, jojba, shea butter and maybe 2 more. I want to make some thing new.
my question is: what should I make with tallow? what's the benefit and purpose ?

thanks

Andre
 

lsg

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You can use tallow to make CP soap. 25% coconut, 8% Castor, 20% tallow and 47% olive should make a nice bar.
 

tarkus

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thanks for your replay. I put your recipe in calculator can we increase bubbly and creamy? our water is very hard doesn't want to bubble. for that reason I always try to make more bubbly. one way I do is by adding honey. what do you think?
 

IrishLass

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Isg's recipe looks really good. I'd make that in heartbeat. :thumbup:

Generally, tallow can be used in place of palm (just make sure to run it through a lye calculator first to get the correct amount of lye)


IrishLass :)

Edited to add that we must have been cross-posting. If you made Isg's recipe and added honey, I think it would be fabulous for bubbles.
 
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DeeAnna

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A question -- you said tallow "oil" in the subject line and I want to make sure that you are talking about the whole fat rendered from cow suet. Tallow is a white solid material at room temperature. Is this the stuff?

Or are you are talking about a liquid oil derived from tallow that would be a liquid at room temperature?
 

cmzaha

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At price and the wonderful benefits of Seabuckthorn why waste it in soap, but maybe you have a great source for it. It is wonderful in balms and lotions
 

lsg

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I believe that sodium lactate is also supposed to increase bubbles.
 

IrishLass

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I believe that sodium lactate is also supposed to increase bubbles.
Isg- speaking only of my own soaps, I find that it acts much like castor in the lather department, i.e., I find it doesn't necessarily increase the bubblage, but rather supports it instead, or in other words, it adds a lovely, creamy body to what's already there.....as well as doing other lovely things, too.


DeeAnna said:
A question -- you said tallow "oil" in the subject line and I want to make sure that you are talking about the whole fat rendered from cow suet. Tallow is a white solid material at room temperature. Is this the stuff?

Or are you are talking about a liquid oil derived from tallow that would be a liquid at room temperature?
You bring up a good point, DeeAnna. I recently saw a post by Obsidian in regards to something known as 'tallow oil'. The tallow oil she was referring to was actually a plant-based oil with no relation to cows or other animals.

If that's what Tarkus is referring to, I may have to change my earlier advice until I know more.

In either case, I am making a batch if Isg's tallow recipe today (with beef tallow).


IrishLass :)
 

DeeAnna

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Yes, I saw Obsidian's post too. I had forgotten about that one, Irish Lass, so thanks for making that connection.

But there's also a liquid oil that can be harvested from animal fats (tallow or lard) and palm oil. It's the rough equivalent of fractionated coconut oil, just using tallow (or lard or palm) as the starting point rather than coconut oil. A common name for this is "olein", but if memory serves me correctly, it is/was also called tallow oil.
 
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