When rebatching how much water can I add?

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by flavapor, May 22, 2012.

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  1. May 22, 2012 #1

    flavapor

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    I want my rebatch to be creamy enough to sort of pour and my last try of rebatching I added about an oz of dist water and it was to hard to pour. I want to be able to recolor/refragrance and either put it in a mold or roll the soap into a balls. What would be the correct amount for a pound of rebatch?
     
  2. May 22, 2012 #2

    sudbubblez

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    All I can tell you about the amount of water needed is.. "enough". You will not be able to pour rebatch soap, it will be like scooping and gloping and the more water you add to it the longer its going to take to cure and the more its going to shrink.
     
  3. May 22, 2012 #3

    Fragola

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    The classic recommendation is the "salad dressing measure", which means that you add water enough to slightly wet your shreds.

    You can work your way up from there, with adding hot water.

    A little alcohol (ethanol) can make your soap very pourable, but rebatching with alcohol is a skill that needs practice, and not something that can be explained in few words.

    But basically it's the same stuff - start with salad dressing and work your way up. This time, make sure you stay under the boiling point of alcohol, or funny things can happen. Also, alcohol is inflammable, and the vapors aswell.
     
  4. May 22, 2012 #4

    sudbubblez

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    Alcohol is highly flammable. The vapors even moreso. depending on the conditions, it can be a full on explosion. Alcohol boils at 181 degrees
     
  5. May 22, 2012 #5

    Fragola

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    You are aware that inflammable means flammable, right ?

    Just checking :)
     
  6. May 22, 2012 #6

    sudbubblez

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    Well, I am now. Thanks for that slice of humble pie. Btw inflammable is a figurative not a technical term b/c its commonly misunderstood as a negative meaning "not flammable". You are aware of that right? Just checking. :p
     
  7. May 22, 2012 #7

    Fragola

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    Well, I'm not a technical person, just for some reason I'm more used to "inflammable".
     
  8. May 22, 2012 #8

    Genny

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    Uh oh, I hope this thread doesn't become inflammable ;)

    You can also rebatch using a little milk, which I find makes the soap more smooth than water.
     
  9. May 22, 2012 #9

    flavapor

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    thank you all for the input, I think I will go with milk or water, not interested in blowing myself up over a **** bar of soap.

    I dont need smooth, I want to make an uneven surface in a log mold so rebatch should do me just fine I hope.

    While I am on the subject, I want to make a clear or nearly clear bar of soap thats not mp.
    I am thinking hp, but would I be looking for a glycerine recipe? I am not sure what I should be researching? Anyone know?
     
  10. May 22, 2012 #10

    Genny

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  11. May 22, 2012 #11

    new12soap

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  12. May 22, 2012 #12

    flavapor

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    Thanks to both of you for the links. I will be checking them out tonight.
     
  13. May 23, 2012 #13

    carebear

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    typically in the US - flammable is used for something that catches fire easily and inflammable for the opposite. but technically both mean something that catches fire easily - go figure.

    but enough with the back and forth. it's about communicating, here, not about who is right and in case you were wondering - I am :) )

    beware - alcohol catches fire easily.
     
  14. May 23, 2012 #14

    Genny

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    *snort* :lol:
     
  15. May 23, 2012 #15

    new12soap

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    As far as I know there isn't really a standard measure, depends on how dry the soap is etc, but I will say that I think you should add as little liquid as possible to get the job done. Enough liquid to make it "pourable" wil just take that much longer to dry and you risk shrinking and warping.
     
  16. May 24, 2012 #16

    flavapor

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    Thanks for that advice
     

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