What soapy thing have you done today?

Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums

Help Support Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums:

LisaBoBisa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2022
Messages
115
Reaction score
251
Location
US
I tried to emulate one of my favourite soaper's ( Clover Soapworks) swirly tops in a slab mold today. FAIL! It still looks pretty - but my gold mica swirl on the top didn't turn out all glittery like his does. Mine was orange - yes orange! And the rest of the soap is teal, white and green so orange doesn't;t really go with the theme.
Is it because I put a little soap batter in it that it turned orange? Should I have just left the mica and oil alone? I was scared I wouldn't have enough of just the mica, and also that it wouldn't absorb well so i thought the soap batter would help.
Can you post a picture link?😍
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2019
Messages
3,935
Reaction score
9,172
Location
Virginia
🤦‍♀Realized that I used iodized salt to render all of my lard and tallow. Which means all my lard and tallow has iodine in it. Which is a metal that can cause DOS...?
Welp... Maybe I'd better make a lot of pie crusts? And I love tamales...
But maybe I can re-render this and make it soap safe.
As I recall, some folks use table salt for salt bars and don’t have a problem. Maybe you should start a thread before you re-render.
 

earlene

Grandmother & Soaper
Joined
Apr 30, 2016
Messages
9,461
Reaction score
11,443
Location
Western Illinois, USA
🤦‍♀Realized that I used iodized salt to render all of my lard and tallow. Which means all my lard and tallow has iodine in it. Which is a metal that can cause DOS...?
Welp... Maybe I'd better make a lot of pie crusts? And I love tamales...
But maybe I can re-render this and make it soap safe.
Iodine is NOT a metal, it is non-metallic. It is in fact a halogen, meaning it is a salt former. (link)

As for causing DOS, even though halogens are oxidizers, I have not had DOS in my soaps with iodized salt added, although I do not purposely use iodized salt in my soap & when I have done, it was in small amounts. Iodine is the least oxidizing of the halogens listed on the periodic table, but I doubt you're going to be adding any of the others to soap, except if you use chlorinated water in your lye solution, in which case you would need to know that chlorine is a stronger oxidizer than iodine.

When have I used iodized salt in soap & why? Sometimes I make soap when I travel & because of that, I have on occasion used salt packets that indicated 'iodized salt' because that was what I had available to me at the time. Most of the time, however, I do use non-iodized salt when making soap with added salt.

But as I said, I have no recollection of any of those soaps going rancid. That is not to say that it cannot happen, of course it could; I just know that I have not had that experience as yet.

It also depends on the oils used in a particular soap formula. Oils with a high iodine value are more susceptible to oxidation, so if a soapmaker uses a formula high in unsaturated fats, then perhaps that soap would be more likely to develop DOS than a formula low in unsaturated fats. Grapeseed oil, for example is prone to faster rancidity (Iodine Value = 131) Lard's IV is a mere 57, so less susceptible. Coconut Oil's IV is 10, so if you made a Lard/CO soap, you'd have less of a concern that if you made a Grapeseed/CO soap because the combine Iodine Value of those soaps would be drastically different if the CO was at the same percentage in the formulas.

Perhaps of more concern is this: Will the iodine render your lard more susceptible to oxidation now while it awaits usage in your refrigerator? I don't know, but do remember it has a low Iodine number to start with, but
perhaps you should keep an eye on it, make some soap with it soon & keep an eye on them and make lots of tamales & pies. :thumbs:
 

LisaBoBisa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2022
Messages
115
Reaction score
251
Location
US
Iodine is NOT a metal, it is non-metallic. It is in fact a halogen, meaning it is a salt former. (link)

As for causing DOS, even though halogens are oxidizers, I have not had DOS in my soaps with iodized salt added, although I do not purposely use iodized salt in my soap & when I have done, it was in small amounts. Iodine is the least oxidizing of the halogens listed on the periodic table, but I doubt you're going to be adding any of the others to soap, except if you use chlorinated water in your lye solution, in which case you would need to know that chlorine is a stronger oxidizer than iodine.

When have I used iodized salt in soap & why? Sometimes I make soap when I travel & because of that, I have on occasion used salt packets that indicated 'iodized salt' because that was what I had available to me at the time. Most of the time, however, I do use non-iodized salt when making soap with added salt.

But as I said, I have no recollection of any of those soaps going rancid. That is not to say that it cannot happen, of course it could; I just know that I have not had that experience as yet.

It also depends on the oils used in a particular soap formula. Oils with a high iodine value are more susceptible to oxidation, so if a soapmaker uses a formula high in unsaturated fats, then perhaps that soap would be more likely to develop DOS than a formula low in unsaturated fats. Grapeseed oil, for example is prone to faster rancidity (Iodine Value = 131) Lard's IV is a mere 57, so less susceptible. Coconut Oil's IV is 10, so if you made a Lard/CO soap, you'd have less of a concern that if you made a Grapeseed/CO soap because the combine Iodine Value of those soaps would be drastically different if the CO was at the same percentage in the formulas.

Perhaps of more concern is this: Will the iodine render your lard more susceptible to oxidation now while it awaits usage in your refrigerator? I don't know, but do remember it has a low Iodine number to start with, but
perhaps you should keep an eye on it, make some soap with it soon & keep an eye on them and make lots of tamales & pies. :thumbs:
I am an idiot--I was sitting on the couch with the periodic table on the wall behind me when I typed that nonsense. Thanks for the helpful info on which are oxidizers... Ochem is next semester, so I haven't gotten there yet! Understanding the why makes such a big difference. I've never really understood the importance of iodine value, and I'll start paying better attention to it. The batch that went bad on me was vegan, but had a high IV. It eventually spread to the 3 leftover lard bars in the same curing box (same scent) but those were 6 months old; I should've bagged then up already.
Glad you posted this today--I've started reformulating my HP recipes with lower linoleic/linoleic acid, and I'll watch the IV now, too. THANK YOU!
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Messages
7,195
Reaction score
13,096
Location
US
I unmolded a batch of (my version of) Earlene's blacksmith soap. It's my base oil recipe with her recommended percentages of borax and fine pumice. Scented with a lavender-chamomile-pine EO blend, it's a big hit with our mechanic and yard maintenance crew. My husband and I use it, too. It does such a great job of cleaning off the grime without stripping or drying the skin.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2022
Messages
23
Reaction score
67
Iodine is NOT a metal, it is non-metallic. It is in fact a halogen, meaning it is a salt former. (link)

As for causing DOS, even though halogens are oxidizers, I have not had DOS in my soaps with iodized salt added, although I do not purposely use iodized salt in my soap & when I have done, it was in small amounts. Iodine is the least oxidizing of the halogens listed on the periodic table, but I doubt you're going to be adding any of the others to soap, except if you use chlorinated water in your lye solution, in which case you would need to know that chlorine is a stronger oxidizer than iodine.

When have I used iodized salt in soap & why? Sometimes I make soap when I travel & because of that, I have on occasion used salt packets that indicated 'iodized salt' because that was what I had available to me at the time. Most of the time, however, I do use non-iodized salt when making soap with added salt.

But as I said, I have no recollection of any of those soaps going rancid. That is not to say that it cannot happen, of course it could; I just know that I have not had that experience as yet.

It also depends on the oils used in a particular soap formula. Oils with a high iodine value are more susceptible to oxidation, so if a soapmaker uses a formula high in unsaturated fats, then perhaps that soap would be more likely to develop DOS than a formula low in unsaturated fats. Grapeseed oil, for example is prone to faster rancidity (Iodine Value = 131) Lard's IV is a mere 57, so less susceptible. Coconut Oil's IV is 10, so if you made a Lard/CO soap, you'd have less of a concern that if you made a Grapeseed/CO soap because the combine Iodine Value of those soaps would be drastically different if the CO was at the same percentage in the formulas.

Perhaps of more concern is this: Will the iodine render your lard more susceptible to oxidation now while it awaits usage in your refrigerator? I don't know, but do remember it has a low Iodine number to start with, but
perhaps you should keep an eye on it, make some soap with it soon & keep an eye on them and make lots of tamales & pies. :thumbs:

Earlene, i just want to pop in quickly to thank you for your posts. I always learn something from your knowledge, expertise, and clear communication which enables me to understand the science/process. I appreciate you!
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2018
Messages
2,454
Reaction score
7,814
Location
Minnesota
I unmolded a batch of (my version of) Earlene's blacksmith soap. It's my base oil recipe with her recommended percentages of borax and fine pumice. Scented with a lavender-chamomile-pine EO blend, it's a big hit with our mechanic and yard maintenance crew. My husband and I use it, too. It does such a great job of cleaning off the grime without stripping or drying the skin.
Just to repeat myself within a few days, but I love @earlene's blacksmith soap too! The dirt just rinses right off. I'm used to scrubbing my hands red and raw but no more! I've gotta coupla tweaks to make but highly recommend it!
 

Picklekin

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2022
Messages
17
Reaction score
31
Location
Uk
I "tried" to make a very small batch of soap to make some dough (first try) at this... however.... I think I didn't check my temperatures correctly (measured spatula??)… As one tiny blend and... scrambled egg :rolleyes:

Not to be defeated though I turned it into my first go at hot process soap 🤣 I've wrapped it up and will see if I can use it in my shiny new extruder tomorrow... who knows! It's all an adventure 😄
 

earlene

Grandmother & Soaper
Joined
Apr 30, 2016
Messages
9,461
Reaction score
11,443
Location
Western Illinois, USA
I am an idiot--I was sitting on the couch with the periodic table on the wall behind me when I typed that nonsense. Thanks for the helpful info on which are oxidizers... Ochem is next semester, so I haven't gotten there yet! Understanding the why makes such a big difference. I've never really understood the importance of iodine value, and I'll start paying better attention to it. The batch that went bad on me was vegan, but had a high IV. It eventually spread to the 3 leftover lard bars in the same curing box (same scent) but those were 6 months old; I should've bagged then up already.
Glad you posted this today--I've started reformulating my HP recipes with lower linoleic/linoleic acid, and I'll watch the IV now, too. THANK YOU!
Please do not call yourself and idiot! We all have moments of clarity and we all also have moments of misremembering. We need to forgive ourselves for occasionally misstating or misunderstanding or whatever other slight gaffe. We are human, after all, not gods. I know I often have such moments where I cannot even think of the descriptive word I want and it can be frustrating trying to complete a sentence when a particular adjective just slips away into the ether.
Earlene, i just want to pop in quickly to thank you for your posts. I always learn something from your knowledge, expertise, and clear communication which enables me to understand the science/process. I appreciate you!
Thank you both. I would always defer to DeeAnna and others with more scientific knowledge & expertise. It's really been a long time since my chemistry classes & the fact that I remember any of it sometimes surprises me.

@AliOop & @Zing, I am so glad you found something useful to you in my Blacksmith soap. I highly encourage tweaking to fit your own personal preferences. The recipe I shared is not set in stone; it was just the one that my brother preferred at the time, so that's the one I shared. I am not above changing out the oils to fit the needs of the user (my brother) or personal preference (the soapmaker) or even based on availability (supply). What with the supply chain problems of late, I am grateful that soapmaking is so versatile and that we can easily adjust a recipe to use what is available at any given time.
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2018
Messages
4,610
Reaction score
11,436
Location
Hamilton, New Zealand
I’m using my dishwashing machine to wash soap dishes for the first time. It’s like a shower steamer for my house! It smells so good!
Make sure you scrape out all the soap you can and put them in as clean as possible otherwise it can gunk up your filter.
 
Top