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milky

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Maybe this is a silly question but what happens when you use too much water?
What about when that liquid is milk and you use too much of that? What about using evaporated milk?

I dewormed one of my milking goats and saved her milk for soap, but it's taking over my freezer. There's no way we'd use all the soap it would make in a reasonable time frame and I don't know how to go about selling it. Only have one milk customer. Is there a way to use more milk than usual? Could I still count it as water if I simmered and reduced it?
 

Dorymae

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I would not recommend it. Too much liquid will keep your soap too soft for an extended period of time. Additionally milk is a heater. This means you have to be careful even when using the correct amount. First you could burn the milk with the lye (smell is terrible), then you need to take care after the soap is poured that it doesn't overheat. Overheating causes such things as volcanos at its worst and cracking, zombie teeth, and a excess of ash.

My suggestion is learn to make cheese.
 

shunt2011

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I too wouldn't recommend too much excess liquid. You could end up with squishy soap and it could also overheat or volcano or separate.
 

TeresaT

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My suggestion is learn to make cheese.

Mmmmmm cheese. Great idea, Dorymae! Goat cheese. Good stuff. The best chiles rellenos I ever had were made with goat cheese at a little hole-in-the-wall restaurant in Irving, TX. I miss Texas.
 

milky

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Thanks for your replies. I guess too much liquid extends the drying or curing time by a lot? And milk I know is risky.. I can make cheese with the normal milk but the frozen was withheld because of deworming. Didn't want to consume or sell it yet it's a precious thing to throw away.
 

DeeAnna

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Also too much liquid will make it harder to get a stable emulsion (aka trace). Without a good method developed, I would not routinely use a lye concentration below about 25%. A 25% lye solution is what many people use for making liquid soap and HP bar soap. I'd be wary about using that concentration (or even lower) with CP, since it's not practical to stir if the batter separates.
 

dixiedragon

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How much milk are you talking about? I know you said you wouldn't use the soap in a reasonable amount of time, but in your place I'd make soap and give a bunch away at Christmas. I love giving soap as gifts. IMO it's pretty much the perfect gift - handmade soap is fairly pricey to buy and something that a lot of people don't buy for themselves. It's a consumable item, not something that sits around and needs to be dusted or stored. It has no calories. it's easy to use, unlike those "soup in a jar" or "hot chocolate' in a jar gifts.

Here's a goat milk lotion tutorial from Lindy, one of our Mods.

http://www.soapmakingforum.com/showthread.php?t=48113
 

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