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Votive Shells

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Psychic

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Hi,

I've recently started to 'get into' candle making, as I use a lot of candles for lighting period tents at events.

I'd like to be able to use votive style candles in ironwork made to hold tea-lites. I don't need them to really 'look good', as I want them for lighting more than their looks.

The main issue is that the votives would drip wax over the sides.

This leads me to three possible solutions:

1) Get a clear plastic casing, similar to the re-usable tea-lite molds. However, I cannot seem to find anything like this online. Does anyone know where I might buy these (if they exist)? I'd rather not use the glass ones as they would be heavier/fragile/more expensive.

2) Create some kind of hurricane shell for them, either by lining the votive mold with hurricane type wax, or by dipping a finished votive. Would this work? How easy would it be to line a votive mold for this? What wax is needed, and where can I buy it?

3) Use some other type of candle entirely. Now, my knowledge is very limited at the moment, so I don't know what else would be suitable. Basically, I need a candle that would burn for 6-8 hours (votives are double so would cover two days), fit in a tea-lite sized hole, and wouldn't drip wax everywhere. Can anyone suggest something suitable, or any alternative?

Any answers would be much appreciated.
 

Tabitha

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What about dripless wax?

Plastic cases or hurrican's I would probably not fit the historiac period you are trying to reinvent. How about small ceramic bowls/holders attached to the metal frame w/ the candles in them?

Candles in tents sound like a dangerous combination to me.
 

Psychic

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I hadn't heard of dripless wax, however, from my first tests of the votives, I don't think it would help.

The test one I lit melted the entire surface of the votive, and after about an hour spilt a good amount into the bowl I had it in.

What I need is some kind of outer layer that won't melt to hold it all in.

I already have a quite a few wrought metal holders that are built to take tea-lites, but these don't really last long enough for usefulness.

I need something that will last a bit longer, hence my venture into votives.

Although a plastic case, or hurricane shell, wouldn't really 'fit', I have enough artistic licence to be able to use them, if I can get them to work.

And yes, candles & tents need a lot of though, care, and good placement, however without electricity, getting a reasonable light level isn't possible.
 

Tabitha

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Dripless wax would evaporate or burn off as the candle burned. That is the only type of wax allowed in churches for wedding and such so the floors, pews, etc are not damaged.
 

soapbuddy

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What about using a Glass Bobeche?
I can't post a link, but if you do a search, you will find these.





Irena
 

Psychic

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The Glass Bobeche would make the candle too wide I think.

As for non-drop wax... Does it have a special name?
I've done a google search on related keywords, but cannot find any direct reference to it, or anyone that sells it.
 

pepperi27

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I found this article so maybe this will help you.

We manufature an awesome burning unscented taper candle which is designed to be dripless. The vibrant colors are bold and elegant on this tall slim candle style. These taper candles are made by overdipping a white taper core in an colored unscented wax. The process allows us to make our candles burn down into themselves rather than have the wax run down the outside of the candle. These tapers are excellent for use in weddings along with our unscented pillar candles. Many catering companies prefer that unscented candles are used in areas around food. The main reason for this is that the scent of candles can have an affect on how food may taste. Both our unscented pillars and unscented taper candles are made using the same wax mixtures so they match well in color.
http://www.keystonecandle.com/Unscented_Tapers.htm
 

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