Using coconut milk as your lye water

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by SunRiseArts, May 6, 2017.

  1. May 6, 2017 #1

    SunRiseArts

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    I have been experimenting with milk. My batches are still in the mold, but the soap looked amazing when I poured it.

    I have use goats milk that I found at trader Joes, and buttermilk. Is way easier to work with the goat milk than the buttermilk, but I want to leave them in the mold for at least a week. :mrgreen:

    I am thinking about using coconut milk too and give it at test. Has anyone here use it? Can I use the one that comes in a can?

    I want to substitute my water for the milk. I do not want to add it at trace.

    How about adding coconut flakes to the batter?

    Any information and or experiences you would like to share I would appreciate it. :cool:
     
  2. May 7, 2017 #2

    shunt2011

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    I use coconut milk quite frequently. Though I do mix my lye with just enough water then add powdered milk to the milk to make full milk and mix that in the oils. It's too much hassle to mix lye into milk for me. I masterbatch my lye so this works great
     
  3. May 7, 2017 #3

    debratant

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    If you are going to use the coconut milk as your full water, make sure you buy the coconut milk in the can by the Brand GOYA. With no THICKENERS or GUMS
    My store has it in the spanish section near taco stuffs.

    https://www.amazon.com/Goya-Foods-Unsweetened-Coconut-13-5-Ounce/dp/B00032CT4A


    I made the mistake on my first coconut milk batch by not noticing the can had gums in it and I literally had lye snot! It was so gross and very difficult to get the lye and milk to dissolve properly lol.

    Freeze your milk in ice cube trays or zip lock bags, if you use bags *lay these flat in your freezer* so they are thin enough to be broken up in chunks...put the frozen milk in your lye pitcher then slowly slowly pour your lye into the frozen coconut milk a bit at a time and stir stir stir, repeat. Then soap as usual.

    I have not used the flakes of coconut in soap. I would think they might turn brown, but I don't know.
     
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  4. May 7, 2017 #4

    KristaY

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    I've tried the full water replacement with CM but didn't really like the final soap which I think is due to the increased SF. I much prefer a 50% water replacement. I do what Shunt does and mix the lye with water then SB the CM into the oils, and move along from there.

    If you decide to use CM and don't want a huge increase in SF, you'll have to do the math and calculate the added coconut fat and adjust from there. Depending on the brand I buy, it will increase the SF from 2-5%. I think I had a thread on the math....

    Here it is!

    http://www.soapmakingforum.com/showthread.php?t=51437
     
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  5. May 7, 2017 #5

    Obsidian

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    This is the same way I use coconut milk. I like it a lot more then any animal milk.
    If you do decide to mix your lye into your milk, be prepared for it the thicken and get clumpy, the oil in the milk will start to saponify fairly quickly. Another reason the use the 50% water replacement.
     
  6. May 7, 2017 #6

    Spunky

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    I make my own coconut milk from coconut flakes. I know from other applications it has less fat (but not by much) than from the can when I follow the recipe I got online. I now use less water to make a fattier and thick milk for coconut yogurt, but leave it just as thin as the original when making soap. It has always felt great to me. I'm almost curious enough to do the math. However, I'm looking into master batching, so I don't know if I'll be doing it this way for much longer anyway.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2017 #7

    SunRiseArts

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    I have another question .... If I subtract the milk (whichever one, could be goats) from the water content, and add the lye to the water only, and add the milk only after my batter is trace with the FO's, c would that make the soap go bad? Or the saponification process would take care of that.

    Hope I explained myself.

    Thanks.
     
  8. Oct 8, 2017 #8

    Obsidian

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    Adding milk at trace will not make your soap go bad. The lye is still very active at trace and will react with the milk.
     
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  9. Oct 8, 2017 #9

    SunRiseArts

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    Thank you! I think I will do that, probably less chance of scorching.
     
  10. Oct 8, 2017 #10

    SaltedFig

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    I'm sure you know this already ...

    Remember not to go below 50% solution (so no more concentrated than 1 part lye to 1 part plain water) when you do your subtraction for milk, so the lye can fully dissolve.

    (And what Obsidian said)

     
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  11. Oct 9, 2017 #11

    jcandleattic

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    There are a lot of milk soapers that use this method for adding their milk, specifically for the purpose of not having the milk scorch, start to saponify the fats in the milk, and many other reasons.
    IMO/IME it also makes soaping with milk a bit easier, especially for soapers who have never worked with milk before.
     
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  12. Oct 9, 2017 #12

    IrishLass

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    Ditto what jcandleattic said^^^^. Look up 'split method'. It's the method I (and many others) use when making soaps with milk. It has proven itself to be so easy and trouble-free for me that I refuse to soap with milk any other way.


    IrishLass :)
     
  13. Oct 10, 2017 #13

    SunRiseArts

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    yes, and I did. The batter looked gorgeous, and it has been a while since it look as I liked it!

    Lt's hope it stays that way!
     
  14. Oct 10, 2017 #14

    Cirafly24

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    I absolutely love using coconut milk in my soaps. I freeze the coconut milk, and use 50/50 coconut milk and water in my recipes. I've received many compliments on how great the lather is in my coconut milk soaps.
     
  15. Oct 10, 2017 #15

    JuliaNegusuk

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    I have used goat milk lots of times in fact most of my soap making is with goat milk. I have always used 100%full fat goat milk ice cubes to make the lye and instantly refrigerated on pouring, I have never had any issues with discoloration or partial gel etc. I have also made 100% coconut oil soap quite a lot, one of my favourites. Rather than use coconut milk I like to use coconut water from the middle of the coconut (ok actually from a can!) I have never bothered to freeze this though I keep the temperatures cool. I always include desicated coconut for a bit of texture and it has never gone brown. I have a soap that is at least a year old and it is still snowy white as first made.
     
  16. Oct 12, 2017 #16

    Skatergirl46

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    Same here. Why do it the hard way?
     
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  17. Oct 12, 2017 #17

    SunRiseArts

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    Has anyone made a 100 % coconut oil soap with 20 % superfat, and coconut milk as the liquid?
     
  18. Oct 12, 2017 #18

    IrishLass

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    I make my salt bars with 100% coconut oil, 100% coconut milk as my liquid and 25% salt ppo, @ a 13% superfat.


    IrishLass :)
     
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  19. Oct 12, 2017 #19

    jcandleattic

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    Yes, and it's fabulous!

    I also make salt bars this way, but only use 50% salt ppo, and SF at 15%.
     
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  20. Oct 12, 2017 #20

    0115d8cf

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    This sounds so dreamy.
     
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