Using butter to make soap

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by Goatherd, Sep 22, 2012.

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  1. Sep 22, 2012 #1

    Goatherd

    Goatherd

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    Hello

    I've just found this forum and it looks very interesting so I shall have a look round later but I was searching for an answer on a soap making question so hopefully someone can help.

    I haven't made a lot of soap but last year I rendered some lard from pork fat and made a batch with goats milk and oatmeal. Although it smelled rather porky at first, the odour faded after a while and it was fine.

    We are now out of pig fat but since I make a lot of goats butter I wondered if I could use that instead. I notice on the MMS Lye Calculator that butterfat has been added but is that the same as plain old butter?

    Has anyone ever tried making soap from butter?

    If this has been discussed before can someone point me in the right direction?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Sep 22, 2012 #2

    Lindy

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    I remember someone tried that years ago, but the outcome wasn't so good.
     
  3. Sep 22, 2012 #3

    tlm884

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    Butter is high in butyric acid and it stinks real bad when you soap with it.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2012 #4

    Hazel

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    I have heard of people using butter in soap. However, it was said it is best to use clarified butter and not to use more than 20%. (eta: as tlm884 mentioned regular butter stinks because of the butyric acid). There is a way to make your own clarified butter (like ghee) but I don't know how this is done. I'm sure you could google on how to clarify butter since it's used in some types of cooking.

    There might be more discussions but here are some info

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=32123&p=286605
    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=17153&p=154475
    viewtopic.php?p=177918

    HTH
     
  5. Sep 22, 2012 #5

    Goatherd

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    Thanks for your replies. I'm still not sure whether to give it a try or not. First of all I'll have a go at making ghee.

    Those links were great Hazel. Teaspring seems to have had some success with butter and I shall have a look for that book Anne L Watson, Milk Soapmaking.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. Sep 22, 2012 #6

    Hazel

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    You're welcome! Remember - you can always use it for cooking. :wink:
     
  7. Sep 22, 2012 #7

    danahuff

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    Anne Watson has a butter soap recipe in her book on Milk Soapmaking. It would violate copyright to post the whole recipe, but it looks like the recipe calls for 4 ounces of butter and 9 ounces of distilled water (in addition to the other ingredients), so I think it treats the butter as one of the fats instead of using it to mix with the lye as some milk soapmakers do. However, I should note that I am 1 in 4 as far as completely successful milk soaps go, so I am clearly not an authority. I would listen to these other ladies if they say it's a bad idea.
     
  8. Sep 23, 2012 #8

    thefarmerdaughter

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  9. Sep 23, 2012 #9

    Goatherd

    Goatherd

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    I've found Anne Watson's book on Amazon so I will buy that and have a go. I think it will be very useful since I have a plentiful supply of goat's milk to use up.

    Appreciate all the replies.
     
  10. Sep 23, 2012 #10

    danahuff

    danahuff

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    Good luck! I really liked her books a lot.
     
  11. Sep 24, 2012 #11

    Half Caper Farm

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    I used to work as a buyer for a manufacturer of industrial lubricants. As I recall, caprylic acid smelled a lot like dead billy goats! :shock: That being said, I'm jealous that you are able to make goat butter . . . bottle kids are drinking all my extra milk!
     
  12. Sep 24, 2012 #12

    Goatherd

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    Dead billy goat soap doesn't sound very appealing :shock:

    Goat's butter is delicious and very white unlike cow's butter so I was hoping for a pure white soap. I like to make soap from stuff I have around rather than buy ingredients. I'm hoping the book will help.
     
  13. Sep 24, 2012 #13

    Genny

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    No it doesnt, but what a heck of a great conversation starter if you ever decide to market your soap LOL
     

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