Ugh, I think I ruined my silicone mold

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Calling on the help of all you chandlers here! I'm a new soaper, and for kicks decided to try some candles for Christmas.

The question: How do I clean a mix of GW 464, mica and FO residue out of a silicone cavity mold? I'm a fistful of paper towels into this greasy mess, and I'm not making much headway. I just figured I'd ask the collective wisdom here if I'm missing some magic trick.

The back story: My mom likes uniquely scented candles. Apple doesn't fall far, so with a bag of 464 and a handful of wicks, I decided to raid my soap FO stash and whip up a few for Christmas. For the vessel, I could use HTP 93 wicks or wooden ones. I figured I'd ask which she'd prefer. She then informed me that while she buys lots of candles, she doesn't ever actually burn them. :oops: She fears open flame with her rambunctious kitty romping around (smart), so she takes a knife, hacks them to smithereens, and then melts them in a homemade wax melty thingie. She says it works for her.

So, I figured I might as well make some cubes and save her the hacking. A rarely used cavity mold seemed like a good option. I'm debating that choice now. But the end result is cute as cute can be :)

Thank you!!!
 

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GW 464 is soy wax, which is my experience has been an easy clean-up. I use silicone molds for my wax tarts, so I have experience cleaning them up. :)

With soy wax, the easiest way to remove the residue is to wash them in hot, soapy, water. (please note--do not do this with paraffin or beeswax). You could even throw them in the dishwasher if you wanted. It will sometimes still leave a white residue on the mold, but it doesn't affect future tarts at all.
 
Omg, brilliance, all of you! Thank you!

@srez Oh goodness yes, you are so right. Thats why I included the back story so there was a perfectly plausible explanation why I was doing something so bassackwards. 🤣 Had I known I was going to make tarts I would've been prepared. But mom asked for candles... and candles I was going to deliver. The "no wicks please" was unforeseen :rolleyes: but I don't argue with Mom : )

Now that I'm poking around the candle area... those sachets are piquing my interest.... off to google (and probably spend more money :) )
 
Omg, brilliance, all of you! Thank you!

@srez Oh goodness yes, you are so right. Thats why I included the back story so there was a perfectly plausible explanation why I was doing something so bassackwards. 🤣 Had I known I was going to make tarts I would've been prepared. But mom asked for candles... and candles I was going to deliver. The "no wicks please" was unforeseen :rolleyes: but I don't argue with Mom : )

Now that I'm poking around the candle area... those sachets are piquing my interest.... off to google (and probably spend more money :) )

I saw something the other day that I had never considered before-- a wickless candle. It's just what it sounds like--a candle without a wick. You'd need to get your mother an electric tart burner (I have the one pictured below, and I got a different style for each of my two adult step-daughters and made them a bunch of tarts). They are designed to be used with or without wax melts. The dish on top comes off (it's just sitting there--I put it in the freezer to pop out the used tarts), and you put a jarred or tinned candle (or wickless candle) right on the base. It melts from the bottom up and can be used over and over.

I've been taking my old BBW candles and melting them, and once all the fragrance is gone, I pour out the melted wax, take the wick out, and reuse the jars for my own scents. :)

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Thank you so much! I am going to keep this idea in my back pocket. I haven't seen the contraption she's made, but she's very pleased with her ingenuity. If I show up with something new-fangledly it might not get a warm welcome, haha. But it's an awesome idea, thank you!!!

Soooooo, super fun, real-world feedback!

Its 26°F here today, so I set the mold outside to chill, then flick off the thick bits. Meanwhile, I filled the basin with the hottest possible water, mixed it with Dawn, and then submerged the mold.

Then the UPS guy shows up (yay! more soaping supplies!). Then a client calls (yay! means to pay for said supplies). Two hours later, it's feeling like wine o'clock, and I toddle downstairs, only to discover the forgotten basin.

Much to my surprise and delight, the hot water pulled the wax, and then it cooled... leaving little waxy boats floating merrily all over the top of the water! A couple of dips with a fine mesh sieve and all the too-scary-for-my-plumbing bits were whisked to the trash, and I was able to clean up nicely and safely.

It took a village. I thank you all.
 
@Carly B Thank you so much! I was VERY curious if dishwashing liquid would break this stuff up and it would be safe to go down the drain. Thank you!!!
I actually saturate them in bleach to remove all colors. it works for me for now. I cant garuenttee it doesn't effect or ruins the mold. ... but if you believe its gone bad ...what the heck..
 
Thats a neat idea, thank you! I was actually able to do a fairly good job cleaning it up. I may not ever use the mold for soap again because there is staining, but I didn't like the size and shape of the bars anyhow so no big loss. Thanks!
 
I wouldn't worry about the staining. Several of mine are stained, and I've never had color transfer from the stained molds to a new product. Perhaps you should make some test soap just to be sure. In the name of science, of course. Not because you are looking for an excuse to make soap. Of course not! ;)
 
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