Twofer! Bath Bomb Colorants & Sodium Alginate!

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BedBathAndBaphomet

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Hello everyone! Long time lurker, first time poster.

I have two questions and I need your feedback!

So, I've got my high-humidity bath bomb recipe down and settled, but I am having a small issue with colorants and the idea of sodium alginate.

First, my colorants used are a mixture of "professional grade" food coloring and mica. Using the amounts suggested in the average of all of the recipes I've found, the colorants make the bomb itself look alright (if a bit subdued), but when it plays out in the tub, they dont bring a vivid coloration to the water at all. Its like a pastel version of what I was aiming for. Any suggestions on how to brighten up the colors of the bomb itself, and the coloring that can be seen n the bomb itself?

Sodium alginate is something I've been toying with in order to make "jelly bombs". Basically bath bombs whose suds are slimy. The alginate needs calcium to do its job, but everyone says that calcium lactate is required. Can calcium carbonate work?

Thanks yall!

After doing a deep dive into colorant, I do believe I've found my problem with coloration in bath bombs. So, I solved one issue and found myself now with many more questions! This is a good problem, I suppose!

I think I've seetled in that I don't want to use Lakes for now. I am going to stick to Water Soluble dyes and micas. Micas may not have the vibrant colors I'd like to have, but they seem slightly safer to use and a bit more user-friendly. And with the Polysorbate 80, less liable to stain skin or tub.

Creative Bath Labs uses food coloring. Has anyone gotten good results from food coloring?

I'm also going to try an experiment using alginate with calcium lactate as well as calcium carbonate and see which works best. We'll see!

Any suggestions for colorants and their best practices would be greatly appreciated!
 

Rsapienza

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I do not believe food coloring is approved for bath bombs (if selling). I,personally have never used it. This should help you.

 

Megan

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Keep in mind: dyes fade rather quickly, so that might be an issue for you. Always keep the final product in a light free area.

As far as why they aren't vivid, you probably aren't using enough...but as for the food coloring, I would not use food coloring...depending on what exactly is in it, you might run the risk of dyeing the tub or yourself.

As for the alginate...you can experiment with it. I'm not sure if you got the idea from Lush, but would like to point out that Lush used to sell these and I'm pretty sure they discontinued them due to a overwhelming amount of bad reviews. So test them well and get feedback from whoever you can when deciding on whether to use it or not.
 

Juggsy

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I might be too late too the party here. Life took some unexpected turns.


I don't use food colouring in bath bombs. I tend to use lakes, pigments and micas. No matter what I use, I add some polysorbate 80 as it really really does help with emulsifying colours and doesn't leave a bath ring.

But I use sodium alginate, calcium lactate and calcium carbonate in my shower bombs/fizzes. Not shower steamers (don't get me started on what a waste a shower steamer is). And they are superior to the lush ones and they are loved by my clients.

If you are using SA+CL in a bath bomb it will slow the fizz. That's why we use them in shower bombs/fizzes. I use SA @5% CL @2% and CC @2% but again in shower bombs/fizzes.


As said, never used in bath bombs as we want a fast reaction. I also wonder if when used in bath bombs it may affect bubbles? If adding SLSA to make floating BBs. Completely unsure as I add SLSA to shower bombs/fizzes.
 
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Juggsy

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I have two questions and I need your feedback!

So, I've got my high-humidity bath bomb recipe down and settled, but I am having a small issue with colorants and the idea of sodium alginate.



Sodium alginate is something I've been toying with in order to make "jelly bombs". Basically bath bombs whose suds are slimy. The alginate needs calcium to do its job, but everyone says that calcium lactate is required. Can calcium carbonate work?



I'm also going to try an experiment using alginate with calcium lactate as well as calcium carbonate and see which works best. We'll see!
Just having a quick look at using sodium alginate in bath bombs....and all the ones I've seen use it at 1:1 with citic acid. Surely that's just going to create jelly. I don't know if I would like sitting in a tub of goo. 😂🤣


Also.... The cheapest I've been able to source sodium alginate here in Australia was like $45 for 500g. Not including delivery.

Going to be a very expensive bath bomb.

The shower bombs/fizzes I make with sodium alginate cost 8.82 to make 120g disc. Not including labour or packaging or overheads. Ingredients only.



Actually found this from How to Make Bath Bombs | Lush Bath Bomb Recipe

I hate when they aren't in percentages or grams but you might be able to understand...
Dry Ingredients

2 ounces Baking Soda
1-ounce Citric Acid (add at the end to ensure fizzing doesn't occur in your bowl)
1 ounce Corn Starch
1/4 teaspoon Sodium Alginate (Algin)
Wet Ingredients

1/8 teaspoon Grapefruit Essential Oil
1/8 teaspoon Sweet Orange Essential Oil
1/4 ounce Cocoa Butter
1/8 teaspoon Water or Witch Hazel in a spritzer bottle
Additional Ingredients - Added at the very end

1/4 teaspoon of cosmetic grade colorant or natural food coloring yellow
1/4 teaspoon of cosmetic grade colorant or natural food coloring orange
 

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