Quantcast

Tested First Batch of Soap

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

TeaLeavesandTweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
100
Reaction score
85
So I my first batch of soap was 80% lard, 20% CO with no additives, just fat, distilled water, and lye. It's been curing about 4 weeks now (officially, tomorrow is 4 weeks since I unmolded it), so I decided to give it a try in the shower today. First, I lathered it in the sink to make sure I didn't get any surprises (and it's been zap-tested thoroughly). Then, into the shower.

It lathered so beautifully and the lard smell is completely gone. It really doesn't have any scent at all, although I have had a cold, so maybe I'll notice one later. And I'm concerned that it might be a little drying as it felt very cleansing, but it's a nice recipe regardless.

Now I'm even more excited to test my next soap, which is tallow-based, in a few weeks!

...yeah, I might be addicted. I have a NG shipment arriving tomorrow with some more lye, an FO to try, and a colorant. And lots of ideas!
 

Seawolfe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2014
Messages
3,272
Reaction score
2,984
Location
So Cal
Congrats!! A friend of mine lives in rural China, and around pig killing time wound up with way too much lard - so I taught him to make soap with just that recipe and he and his boys, and the neighbors just love it as an all purpose soap that cleans well. I do believe his wife found it too cleansing so he made some with less CO &/or more superfat or perhaps a bit of almond oil or olive oil (I can't remember sorry) and she is really happy with it as a facial bar.
 

cmzaha

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
11,205
Reaction score
10,047
Location
Southern California
If it stills feels drying to you cut the CO to 15% and add the difference in lard, palm or OO. I personally like palm with lard, but low amounts of Sunflower HO or OO, Rice Bran Oil, Safflower HO are also nice.
 

TeaLeavesandTweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
100
Reaction score
85
Thanks, Carolyn! I'm going to see how my tallow soap feels before I make anything new (it will be tough!), and then probably cut the CO. I don't use palm oil, but I could sneak in a little OO or just add more animal fat. My general philosophy is to add more animal fat.
 

not_ally

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2014
Messages
2,939
Reaction score
1,686
Location
Los Angeles
And I'm concerned that it might be a little drying as it felt very cleansing, but it's a nice recipe regardless.
Did it actually make your skin dry, though? For me it is pretty obvious, my skin feels tight and if it is drying enough I get little white flakes (easier to tell on brown skin:).

That much CO would be too much for me - I rarely exceed 15%, most often a little less - but I do have very dry skin. If you are going to reduce the CO (even if not) I would add some castor for bubbles, at 5-7%, and take that amount out of the lard percentage. Probably also a bit of sugar (1 TB ppo is a safe amount for most, and will be fine in this recipe given how non-speedy the oil mix is).
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
8,962
Reaction score
9,005
Location
Austria
That immediate 'squeaky-clean' feeling is different than a soap actually making your skin dry. It can be caused by hard water for one thing. Glad the first batch is working well!
 

cmzaha

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
11,205
Reaction score
10,047
Location
Southern California
Thanks, Carolyn! I'm going to see how my tallow soap feels before I make anything new (it will be tough!), and then probably cut the CO. I don't use palm oil, but I could sneak in a little OO or just add more animal fat. My general philosophy is to add more animal fat.
Tallow contains myristic acid and lauric in higher percentages than lard, so you will still want to cut the CO. Since those are the cleansing properties
 

commoncenz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
595
Reaction score
758
Location
Ohio
I also notice a big difference in the feeling of my soap at 6-8 weeks as compared to 4 weeks. To me, a 4 week cure in my climate is just too short.
When I first started soaping, years ago, I was told by my grandmother that "those books are wrong. Let that soap sit for at least a month and a half." Trusting the books, rather than a woman who had made soap for decades, I used my first bar at 4 weeks. It was drying. Let the rest sit for the additional two weeks and had a very nice soap.

When I started soaping again, I remembered grandma's advice and won't say a cure is done at less than 6 weeks. For some reason, those extra 2 weeks or more really do make a difference.
 

TeaLeavesandTweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
100
Reaction score
85
When I first started soaping, years ago, I was told by my grandmother that "those books are wrong. Let that soap sit for at least a month and a half." Trusting the books, rather than a woman who had made soap for decades, I used my first bar at 4 weeks. It was drying. Let the rest sit for the additional two weeks and had a very nice soap.

When I started soaping again, I remembered grandma's advice and won't say a cure is done at less than 6 weeks. For some reason, those extra 2 weeks or more really do make a difference.
Oooh, now there's an idea. My skin doesn't actually look dry, but my hands feel a bit drier than usual. That said, I don't usually wash my hands with soap before taking a shower in the morning, and I'm not at my normal desk with my hand lotion, so that could be it.
 

IrishLass

Staff member
Admin
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
16,880
Reaction score
10,619
Location
Right here, silly!
There is definitely something to be said for a 6-week or longer cure. For me and my 2 main formulas, a 4-week cure is when I consider them to be at their absolute 'earliest best'....in other words, the lather is sufficiently acceptable to me at that time and they don't make my particular skin-type feel like it has taken a walk through the Sahara desert during a dust storm. lol But they most assuredly do get even better 6 to 8 weeks down the road. Commoncenz's grandma was a wise woman.


IrishLass :)
 

TeaLeavesandTweed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
100
Reaction score
85
I thought I'd give an update. I don't shower every day, but it's a week later and I'm definitely noticing a positive difference in this soap. The lather has gone from super-bubbly to more creamy-bubbly and it doesn't make me feel dry at all. Even Boyfriend (who insists on using body wash, not soap) used some and doesn't hate it. I'm thinking my next batch will be a scented version of this, since it's behaved so well. I'll just make sure to give it at least 5 weeks without touching it.

Thanks for all the advice!
 

MrsSpaceship

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2015
Messages
259
Reaction score
175
Location
Somewhere West of the Rockies
Soap testing is so much fun. I have my phone set to give me reminders for each batch at 4 weeks and 6 weeks. Of course I can't ever seem to wait until the 6 week point. The only soap that is the exception is my castile I just made, that one is going away until next year... really... honest. :think:
 

rparrny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
512
Reaction score
325
Location
NY
Congrads on your first batch! I never get tired of trying a new batch at cure...it always seems like the first time. Glad your enjoying your soap!
 

Latest posts

Top