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Super Fat

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SPowers

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I've watched a ton of videos and seen different comments on super fat which has raised a question in my mind. In a video or online post, someone said they used a 'specific' oil to super fat their soap... it was an oil not used regularly such as 'neem' or some other such oil that is more expensive with super skin qualities. My question is... how would one know that that particular oil results in the super fat. I'm new and surely don't know much on the subject but my understanding is the higher the super fat % the lower the lye amt... since the lye 'eats' the fats (I'm not very sciency) a lower amount of lye would leave more fat behind to nourish the skin?? It doesn't seem reasonable to me to think that the lye can distinguish between the oils used unless it depends on when those oils are added.

Can someone enlighten me? Please and thanks.
 

Jersey Girl

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When doing CP there is no way to know which oils are left as superfat. The lye takes what it needs without discrimination. With HP you can make your recipe with a 0%SF and then, after cook, add in an oil for SF. From what I have learned though, saponification May still be ongoing for a while so you can’t be assured that what you added after cook is going to be 100% the SF oil you added.
 

DeeAnna

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I agree with what the others have said. I also want to add this --

I have not been able to find reputable sources that show that fat in a typical amount of superfat stays on the skin after the lather is rinsed off. Until I do, I'm not convinced superfat does anything more than emulsify with the soap and wash down the drain.

What superfat definitely does do is modify the ability of a soap to cleanse the skin. The soap emulsifies with the superfat rather than emulsifies and removes natural fats on the skin surface. Soaps high in coconut oil often have a higher than usual superfat to tame down their aggressive cleansing. You don't feel even a 20% superfat fat on the skin, because it's combining with the coconut-oil soap instead.

Even if I assume every particle of superfat 100% sticks to the skin rather than washes off, there is so very little superfat in the few grams of soap used for bathing. This minute amount cannot be helpful to the skin. Far better to use those fats in a lotion or other leave-on product.

The only situation I know of where superfat does remain on the skin is when the superfat is crazy high -- so high that the soap cannot emulsify that much fat. There was a poster some months ago who said their soap left a perceptible layer of fat on the skin. Doing the calculations, I realized the soap they were making contained around 50% superfat.
 

GemstonePony

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Don'tI feel like most of the time, the oil or butter I've seen "superfatted" is one that is low in saponifiables anyways, so unless you're trying to superfat coconut or palm or something, the differences are probably miniscule.
I only use HP if there are oils/butters I'd mostly prefer weren't superfat, and then I add the rest of my oils/butters. However, I'm aware that the lye didn't eat all of the first set, and will eat some of the second set, which is fine. It also lets me add honey via the second set with no visible discoloration whatsoever, so that's nice.

LOL, I'm pretty sure 50% superfat means it's a wash-off body butter, but the concept intrigues me. I mean, it's probably a terrible waste of materials, but it could also be fantastic. Maybe I'll throw together a 100gram batch for giggles.
 

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