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Sugar to soap

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musmar.firas

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Hi
I heard that Sugar can help with bubbles in soap. how much sugar I should add to Oils ? when I should add it? does it work with hot process ?
 

Todd Ziegler

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I have never done HP soap but you can use in CP soap making.

You can use around 1 tsp of sugar per pound of oils.

You will dissolve it in the water that you are going to use for your lye. Once it is dissolved completely, then add it to your lye.

Make sure that it is dissolved completely or it can carmalize. You also might want to put the lye/water/sugar mixture in the fridge to keep it from getting to hot. Then proceed as you normally would with the rest of your recipe.
 

GemstonePony

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I tend to do a bit more than 1tsp per pound of oils, but I do recommend dissolving it and then adding it to cool lye solution. If I add it to hot lye solution, it definitely turns darker and may cause the solution to boil.
 

dibbles

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I also use 1-2 tsp PPO. I use some of the batch water, warm it slightly, make sure the sugar is dissolved completely, then add it back into the batch water before adding the lye. I have never had the batch water get too hot, but I set my pitcher in a large stainless bowl just in case.

I don't usually masterbatch my lye solution, but did recently. When I tried adding sugar dissolved in the additional water to the cool MB lye solution, it turned into a gloppy blob that took forever to stir in - just like adding sugar to cooled lye solution, only not as bad as that. I won't do that again :)

ETA: I make CP, not HP
 
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AliOop

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Yes, you can use sugar for HP. If you want a more fluid batter, I recommend saving some water until the end of the cook. Heat the water, add the sugar and dissolve it, and then stir it well into your cooked batter. The batter will loosen up a lot and be more pourable or even swirlable.

You can also use this hot sugar water to disperse your colorants. Add the colored hot sugar water to the separate pouring containers after splitting your batter.

The key is to make sure the sugar water isn’t colder than your batter. It needs to be hot, or your batter will thicken instead of loosen. You can also dissolve your citric acid or citrate in this water, as well.

ETA: these directions are HP-specific. I don’t do this for CP.
 
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The_Phoenix

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Just a note: sugar caramelizes at 320 degrees, so you will never get your soap that hot, not even during HP. Also, sugar will not caramelize until all water boils/evaporates off--caramelization does not happen if you have more liquid than sugar. Though your lye solution will increase in heat upon upon the addition of sugar, it will only get so hot before it begins to cool down.

A work-around to using sugar in its crystal structure is to make a simple syrup and keep it in the fridge. Basically, add sugar and water (a 1:1 ratio) to a pan and bring it to a boil. Simmer until you see the bubbles increase in size (literally, the bubbles that form on the surface will get bigger--this means that water is rapidly evaporating off). Cool and store in the fridge.
 

gloopygloop

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A go to amount in the UK for sugar is usually 5% of the oil weight in sugar mixed into the lye water prior to the lye, and as already said it must be completely dissolved first. I have not tried the trick of holding the sugar back until the soap is fully saponified, does this still give the same desired bubblyness?
 

senaraj

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Can we add both salt and sugar to the lye water in cold process soap making?
 

soapmaker

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Can we add both salt and sugar to the lye water in cold process soap making?
In a 5 lb. batch I add 4 T. sugar and 3 t. salt to my cold water and dissolve completely before adding lye. Never had a problem.

You will dissolve it in the water that you are going to use for your lye. Once it is dissolved completely, then add it to your lye.
I'm assuming everyone knows not to add the liquid to the lye. Add the lye to the liquid.
 

KimW

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A work-around to using sugar in its crystal structure is to make a simple syrup and keep it in the fridge. Basically, add sugar and water (a 1:1 ratio) to a pan and bring it to a boil. Simmer until you see the bubbles increase in size (literally, the bubbles that form on the surface will get bigger--this means that water is rapidly evaporating off). Cool and store in the fridge.
GENIUS!
 

DeeAnna

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Caramelization temperatures of sugar in water don't apply to sugars added to alkaline mixtures such as lye solution or soap batter. The caramelization of sugars in an alkaline solution occurs at lower temperatures.

"...The rate of caramelization is generally lowest at near-neutral acidity (pH around 7), and accelerated under both acidic (especially pH below 3) and basic (especially pH above 9) conditions. ..."

Source: Wikipedia, Caramelization - Wikipedia where Villamiel, M.; del Castillo, M. D.; Corzo, N. (2006). "4. Browning Reactions". In Hui, Y. H.; Nip, W-.K.; Nollet. L. M. L.; Paliyath, G.; Simpson, B. K. (eds.). Food biochemistry and food processing. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 83–85. ISBN 978-0-8138-0378-4​

"...The degradation of sugars rapidly increased at a high alkaline pH (10.0-12.0) ..."

Source: Kim, J.-S & Lee, Y.-S. (2008). Effect of pH on the Enolization of Sugars and Antioxidant Activity of Caramelization Products Obtained by Caramelization Browning. Food Science and Biotechnology. 17. 931-939.​

"...Strong alkalies, like strong acids, decompose the sugars. Weak alkalies or salts with alkaline reaction, like sodium bicarbonate, common baking soda, also act upon the sugars. Even alkaline salts found in hard water may produce considerable decomposition in some of the sugars. Of the disaccharids those most easily affected by acids are least readily decomposed by alkali, and vice versa. Sucrose is scarcely acted upon by a weak alkali, but maltose and lactose are affected more readily. ..."

Source: Lowe, Belle. Effect of Alkalies upon Sugars. In chapter 2 of Experimental Cookery From The Chemical And Physical Standpoint. John Wiley & Sons. 1937. Text found here: Experimental Cookery From The Chemical And Physical Standpoint | by Belle Lowe
 

AliOop

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what is the purpose of adding sugar?
It boosts the lather of your soap - makes it more bubbly. This change doesn't show up in the soap calculator, so it takes some experimentation to figure out how much you like to add. Other ingredients that include sugar or starch, such as aloe vera juice, honey, sorbitol, milks, rice flour, etc., will do the same thing.
 

Spice

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It boosts the lather of your soap - makes it more bubbly. This change doesn't show up in the soap calculator, so it takes some experimentation to figure out how much you like to add. Other ingredients that include sugar or starch, such as aloe vera juice, honey, sorbitol, milks, rice flour, etc., will do the same thing.
ok, my soaps are really bubbly now but I will try a test batch and see the difference. I will try honey.
 

AliOop

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Oooo honey is the most difficult one. It can really heat up your batter, which in turn can speed up trace. The only "sugar" that I've found to heat up a batter faster than honey is molasses. But both of them do give a nice, slightly sweet smell to the soap. The honey may make it turn a little bit tan, whereas molasses will turn it brown.

I'd recommend dissolving the honey in a little warm water, than blending that into your oils before adding your lye. Others add the dissolved honey water after adding the lye solution, but I find it too easy to forget other things once I've poured the lye solution. Anyway, if you don't get it mixed in very well, you will get brown honey spots in your soap. It doesn't hurt anything, but it can be sticky and attract gnats. Ask me how I know ;)
 

Arimara

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@AliOop I like honey in soap but on this I will have to agree. I just found out why so many of you guys like that aloe vera juice you can get. It's not as simple for me to acquire and I'm at the mercy of availability but I can see me using that instead of distilled water for a while.
 
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